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Discussion Starter #21
A modern CV in France should be no more than 2 pages, preferably 1. The CV is usually put through a program to pick up key words, thus thinning out applicants.

Here are a couple of useful articles

https://www.reconversionprofessionnelle.org/comment-faire-un-cv/

https://www.cadremploi.fr/editorial/conseils/conseils-candidature/detail/article/cv-comment-faire-simple-et-beau.html

Most employer still require a lettre de motivation (especially given the CV is so short), which is an excellent way to explain why you should be hired. See this article

https://www.cadremploi.fr/editorial/conseils/lettre-de-motivation/comment-bien-ecrire-une-lettre-de-motivation


You will note that the above articles differ greatly from the link provided by Bev which is an EU standard - France as usual is different :D

Cadre emploi by the way is a good site to look for positions of the type you are seeking.
This is fantastic advice. Thank you so much!
 

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I have a temporary residency card in the form of a TIE (Tarjeta de Identidad de Extranjero). The physical card technically expires on 5/31/20 (last day of the program) but I'm renewing the program for next school year, which allows me to renew my TIE as well, extending its validity and my legal residence in the Schengen Zone.
Thank you for the information. Perhaps someone here who is familiar with that type of permit will know if can be leveraged in some way.
 

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Thank you for the information. Perhaps someone here who is familiar with that type of permit will know if can be leveraged in some way.
I'm pretty sure it's only permanent residence permits that can be transferred to another EU country, if that's what you were thinking of.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
I'm pretty sure it's only permanent residence permits that can be transferred to another EU country, if that's what you were thinking of.
Yes, exactly, I'm almost certain that's true. So another option is to renew my temporary residency for 3+ years through the same Spain program which is a path to permanent residency (and thus to residency/employment in France as well).
 

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I'm pretty sure it's only permanent residence permits that can be transferred to another EU country, if that's what you were thinking of.
Well, that was one possibility. But, without knowing exactly what her status is, it wasn’t really possible to give any more information.
 

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I have nothing helpful to add, Simone. Just wanted to say that what your hard-to-explain professional experience is, is exactly what I've been doing for work for the last 22 or so years. Under various job titles but the same job and all with the same product/company through multiple mergers and acquisitions. Once I was asked what I did for work and I said "well, it's hard to explain" and the person who asked me said "it's illegal, isn't it?"

I told him no, it was nothing anywhere near exciting enough to be illegal. :)

Good luck in your job search! I'm hoping to retire in the next couple of years and move to France as a retiree.
 

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Hi, I am also considering a similar option you presented that one of your friends pursued. What master program did they do by chance and what company? I have not heard of this setup happening so curious what field it was in. Thanks!
 

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Masters/apprenticeship

simominfrance -- You have recieved some good advice, above. Alternately, your idea of pursuing a Master's degree makes sense. I have a friend that, similar to you, initially tried to get a job in France, but found that everything she was looking at required a Master's. She then found a Master's program, in France, that had an apprenticeship as a required part of her Master's. The company paid for her degree, which wasn't much (by U.S. standards) and a stipend that paid everything else. She did live frugally, but after graduation, she got hired, full-time, by the same company and 5 years later, with 3 promotions, she has paid off 100% of her undergraduate debt and has submiited her citizenship dossier. Cheers, 255


Hi, I am also considering a similar option you presented that one of your friends pursued. What master program did they do by chance and what company? I have not heard of this setup happening so curious what field it was in. Thanks!
 

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Hi, I am also considering a similar option you presented that one of your friends pursued. What master program did they do by chance and what company? I have not heard of this setup happening so curious what field it was in. Thanks!
It really depends on the masters program (particularly the subject matter) and how someone does during their internship. I know of French nationals who are very actively recruited by the company they do their student internships for.

It's not really a matter of which masters and which employer, but more one of the companies finding a "good match" during the internships they offer. Nearly every masters program has some form of "stage" (i.e. internship). Obtaining a good stage is basically a dress rehearsal for job hunting.
 

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It really depends on the masters program (particularly the subject matter) and how someone does during their internship. I know of French nationals who are very actively recruited by the company they do their student internships for.

It's not really a matter of which masters and which employer, but more one of the companies finding a "good match" during the internships they offer. Nearly every masters program has some form of "stage" (i.e. internship). Obtaining a good stage is basically a dress rehearsal for job hunting.
Yes like everywhere I guess, only reason I asked is because some masters in the physical sciences area have vastly different salaries and opportunities. I was mainly just curious! Just to clarify, after one gets a qualified masters, when holding APS and searching for a job are non EU able to bypass all the extra red tape concerning hiring? Like the whole "no EU citizen can do this" and such? Or is it the same as applying as a normal applicant who did their studies outside of France?
 

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bcwild -- Bev is exactly correct. There are many such programs, in many subjects, at Universities in France (and elswhere.) My understanding is, my friend just did a "Google" search to find a program that met her parameters (Masters in International Human Resources, in Europe, taught in English.) Most of these programs, in France, are taught in French. When she went to France, she didn't speak much French (now she's been tested to C2,) hence the reason for her "taught in English" requirement.

Specifially, the program that she took was a Master's in International Human Resources (her undergarduate studies were in Psychology,) at Universite Paris II, Pantheon Paris. Her sponsorship company and future employer was L'Oreal Paris.

I have personally done a little research, on a few of these programs, in the UK, France and Switzerland. These apprenticeship programs often work in partnership with specific degree programs (so the University is teaching skills that the company needs.) It is not unusual for the University to help accepted applicants secure their apprenticeships. One program I researhed, has sort of a work fair, with multiple companies, to align students with sponsors, usually in the Summer, before classes start. Cheers, 255
 

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bcwild -- If you graduate from a French Masters' program that has an apprenticeship with a French company (including preparing and defending a real world thesis with/about your work at the French company,) and the company likes your work/work ethic, there is a better than even chance they will "jump through some hoops" to retain you. Unfortunately, they still have the same requirements -- hire a French applicant, then an EU applicant, before they can hire a non-EU applicant. The extra red tape is on the back of the employer, not you (other than stress from a limited time to get hired and get residency.) Cheers, 255
 

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255 - are you talking about "apprenticeships" or "stages" (i.e. internships)?

Most university programs require at least one (and usually multiple) "stages" lasting anywhere from a few weeks to a few months (and maybe involving payment for the work). But usually it's up to the student to secure the stage sponsorship. When we were running our company we got several calls every year from students looking for a stage to fulfill their academic program requirements. Also at least a couple blind call letters with resumés and a few inquiries from schools about whether or not we accepted stagieres.
 

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Bevdeforges -- I do not know. My understanding is it was an apprentenceship (The French Appentissage System.) I didn't meet her until after she completed the program and am only relaying what she explained to me. Whatever it was, I do know she started with about 10 weeks of class/exams, then went and worked for the company and then alternated between classes/exams and work at her firm for the remainder of her one year Masters' program. My understanding is the firm paid for her academic program that wasn't paid by scholarships from the university. She said she also got "paid" during the classroom portions, not just when she was working. Cheers, 255
 

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bcwild -- If you graduate from a French Masters' program that has an apprenticeship with a French company (including preparing and defending a real world thesis with/about your work at the French company,) and the company likes your work/work ethic, there is a better than even chance they will "jump through some hoops" to retain you. Unfortunately, they still have the same requirements -- hire a French applicant, then an EU applicant, before they can hire a non-EU applicant. The extra red tape is on the back of the employer, not you (other than stress from a limited time to get hired and get residency.) Cheers, 255
Ok, so things work quite differently there compared to the USA. Thank you sooo much for this information...I am actually scared of being able to fund myself there (except for burning savings) so wasn't sure if all internships that are part of programs pay you or not. I will try to apply for scholarships but now that France has implemented tuition to non-EU if I do not get a scholarship I will have to wait a year or 2 and work I guess.
 

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Bevdeforges -- I do not know. My understanding is it was an apprentenceship (The French Appentissage System.) I didn't meet her until after she completed the program and am only relaying what she explained to me. Whatever it was, I do know she started with about 10 weeks of class/exams, then went and worked for the company and then alternated between classes/exams and work at her firm for the remainder of her one year Masters' program. My understanding is the firm paid for her academic program that wasn't paid by scholarships from the university. She said she also got "paid" during the classroom portions, not just when she was working. Cheers, 255
It could be, though, that she was employed by the company and the company wanted her to do a Masters and paid for it, perhaps as part of her employment contract, thus she was employed by a company as a 'trainee' on an agreed career path (and her salary may well have been set at a level that took that into account) - that is what it sounds like to me.
 

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EverHopeful -- I do not think that is correct. As I mentioned previously, she told me she found the program through a "Google" search. In fact, she said she wasn't even looking to go to France specifically -- just Europe. She was a recent college grad. and had no job. She told me that all of the jobs she was looking at (in Europe) required a Masters -- hence the change in plans to pursue a Masters' degree. On her "Google" search, she said the program poped up as the third entry and mentioned "free" education. This was a few years ago though. Cheers, 255
 
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