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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A question for those of you who have applied to or received the Competences et Talents visa...
In filling out the long-stay visa form, you need to provide the address in France where you'll will be staying. Clearly it would seem illogical for them to expect you to have rented an apartment before arriving, and presumptuous of you to have rented an apartment before being approved, so is it safe to assume that for this question you can put the address of your short term rental where you'll be living for a while when you arrive? It seems logical to me that that would suffice? Any thoughts?
 

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That's pretty much what most folks do on the long-stay visa application. I think they mainly want to know where they can find you after you land - so a hotel or short term lodging is fine. It's actually much more practical to leave finding a long-term rental until you arrive and can view the places in person.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Fantastic, thanks for the reply. I figured as much. Now... to find listings of short term rentals that allow cats. :)
 

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You probably already know this, but if your dependent is also applying they need a separate appointment. I just say this because we didn't and the visa lady read us the riot act until she realized we had friends in house and went ahead and took the both of us.

At which consulate are you applying?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You probably already know this, but if your dependent is also applying they need a separate appointment. I just say this because we didn't and the visa lady read us the riot act until she realized we had friends in house and went ahead and took the both of us.

At which consulate are you applying?
We're applying in New York and the instructions nor any of the paperwork say anything about needing two separate appointments. They are however very clear about what paperwork she needs to show. Everyone we've ever heard from applying in New York (not that many) have never needed 2 appointments. But I'll call them to ask.
 

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We're applying in New York and the instructions nor any of the paperwork say anything about needing two separate appointments. They are however very clear about what paperwork she needs to show. Everyone we've ever heard from applying in New York (not that many) have never needed 2 appointments. But I'll call them to ask.
Definitely worth asking. The Houston consulate website doesn't say that either. We assumed (wrongly) that I was like an addition to the application, but then she said "Her: Are you not a person!? Me: yes, I'm a person, but I'm not submitting a project, I am dependent on my husband's application... Her: If you are another person, you need another appointment!" She was borderline yelling. I wish I was joking. It was at this point that a friend of ours at the consulate appeared and only then she agreed to process us both. We were shocked. I only warn you because we were blindsided. Then again, maybe it was just our consulate. Just thought I'd share because I wish someone had warned me!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks audrey. Really appreciate it. I am definitely gonna ask because that's the kind of that they'll like, seeing that I asked about it first. Thanks for your advice and experience. I'll let you know what they say.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Only thing the documentation says is a list of what the dependent needs to provide and it also states clearly that the applicant must do the appointment alone.
Speaking of which, what exactly did the appointment involve? Was it an interview type meeting? Was it in French? Did you have to talk about the project?
 

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Thanks audrey. Really appreciate it. I am definitely gonna ask because that's the kind of that they'll like, seeing that I asked about it first. Thanks for your advice and experience. I'll let you know what they say.
Awesome! My husband and I thought we knew what to expect going in there but low and behold we were surprised in the not-so-nice way. I hope it was really one of those arbitrary things, but better safe than sorry! We really didn't think we had a reason to worry going in, but we had the fear of god put in us within seconds of going to visa window. Thankfully we were warned about other things they wanted but that weren't mention on the website. For instance, when we went to our visa appointment there was no mention of health insurance. They called this week for our proof though, so we did have to submit it.

Three years ago, I was going through the UK Tier 1 process and I naively thought we were seasoned and that this process would be similar. I WISH!

I don't think not knowing any of these "tips" will prevent you from getting a visa if they like your project--it's just in the spirit of trying to avoid any delays, surprises, etc. :cool:
 

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Only thing the documentation says is a list of what the dependent needs to provide and it also states clearly that the applicant must do the appointment alone.
Speaking of which, what exactly did the appointment involve? Was it an interview type meeting? Was it in French? Did you have to talk about the project?
Basically you sit down (at least at our consulate) and there's a window with a small slit at the bottom for passing documents. Everything is in English. They immediately ask why you are there. You tell them (at this point she asked why I was there and then the conversation about why I was I there started...)

After being scolded, I went and sat to the side since I was not the applicant. I was next to my husband though so I heard it all. She didn't ask about the details of the project, but she wanted to know what his profession was and immediately asked if he already had French contracts. It was like a rapid fire interrogation. She didn't ask for details of the actual project--the emphasis was more on his profession, reputation and work contracts. She let us know document by document what she needed. My husband did ask them if they needed certain documents (those that were listed on the site but that they didn't ask for) some of which they took, some they didn't. Lastly, they take your fingerprints and take a picture of you. You pay a fee and off you go. We were there almost 2 hours for the actual appointment.

We left feeling dazed but like we had survived something. Nothing I read on here prepared me for the demeanor of the inquiry, but I get the feeling that everyone's experience is unique.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Basically you sit down (at least at our consulate) and there's a window with a small slit at the bottom for passing documents. Everything is in English. They immediately ask why you are there. You tell them (at this point she asked why I was there and then the conversation about why I was I there started...)
After being scolded,
Ok, I haven't finished reading yet, but I just wanted to tell you my wife and I are reading this and really enjoying it. Laughing, not at you but with your account of the whole ordeal. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Ok. Just read everything. Sounds pretty straightforward. What I dont get is how you can be expected to have purchased insurance without knowing whether you'd get approved or not?
Besides arent you supposed to get the basic health insurance when approved? Why do they want you to have alternate insurance?
 

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Ok. Just read everything. Sounds pretty straightforward. What I dont get is how you can be expected to have purchased insurance without knowing whether you'd get approved or not?
You've got me there--although I know we've already been approved (although we don't have our passports back yet) and the insurance is required before they actually issue it. Perhaps you only need insurance if you are approved? What I'm not clear on is if they meant to ask us at the appointment and forgot, or if they asked us after purposefully because we were approved but needed proof of insurance to receive the visa (post approval.)

Perhaps someone else can chime in? :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hmm... now another question occurs to me. I'm a permanent resident in the US. I'm a Canadian citizen. Does that mean I need an insurance for expat Canadians?
I don't even know where to begin looking for info on what insurance companies are best to look at or suitable for me.
 

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Hmm... now another question occurs to me. I'm a permanent resident in the US. I'm a Canadian citizen. Does that mean I need an insurance for expat Canadians?
I don't even know where to begin looking for info on what insurance companies are best to look at or suitable for me.
I don't think that will be too much of a hurdle. I don't know your current employment situation, but you may be able to see what your current insurer might have to offer. I've read some cases where people are ok with travel insurance and others where people get the full enchilada. I think it depends on your odds of getting work quickly and being able to get a carte vitale in a timely matter. If that's realistic you might only need travel cover. Otherwise, you might need a full blown plan. Another person with C&T used AXA for full insurance (a British company), so I'd think being Canadian should be neither here nor there. ?

We lucked out and have BlueCross BlueShield coverage that already extends to France (emergency, doctor visits and hospital stays.) My husband's US job will continue to provide our health insurance, so we managed to dodge that bullet. We intend to make every effort to get a Carte Vitale as soon as it can get processed (we know this could take a year.) My husband is already contributing to the system so we have a bit of a jump start as far as qualifying goes.
 

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Ok. Just read everything. Sounds pretty straightforward. What I dont get is how you can be expected to have purchased insurance without knowing whether you'd get approved or not?
Besides arent you supposed to get the basic health insurance when approved? Why do they want you to have alternate insurance?
The health insurance system in France does NOT automatically kick in on arrival. You normally have to have something like three months of cotisations paid in to be covered - and the normal coverage period runs with the calendar year. So, if you arrive mid-year and work at least 3 months, paying your cotisations, you're good to go for the following calendar year.

Therefore, they require you to have the first year's health insurance up front. Appropriate expat health insurance is usually available through any of several large, international insurers (AXA, Allianz, Bupa, Swiss Life, etc.). In the case of certain "limited term" visas (most notably a student visa) they sometimes require a "travel insurance" policy that include medical evacuation back to your home country (country of residence) in the event of serious accident or injury.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Ok, great, thanks. That was super helpful in understanding the cotisations and how it affects the insurance thing.
And thanks for those companies. You've saved me a lot of time looking up reputable companies. :) :clap2:
 
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