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Meet Miss Cinco de Mayo | San Diego 6 | Friday on San Diego Living

It appears these Mexican Americans feel Cinco de Mayo is a good way of celebrating Mexican and Latino culture and having a good time.
I think Cinco de Mayo in the USA is just a holiday designed by beer companies. Heck, it is celibrated more in the USA states than in the Mexican states. It is mostly a non event in my state, although historically it is taught. And it is a school day, so in Mexico that says alot.
 

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I think Cinco de Mayo in the USA is just a holiday designed by beer companies. Heck, it is celibrated more in the USA states than in the Mexican states. It is mostly a non event in my state, although historically it is taught. And it is a school day, so in Mexico that says alot.
+1

Although, in more northern areas, like the one where I live, there is a real benefit to Cinco de Mayo, in that it allows people who are woefully ignorant of any culture that isn't US or northern European a glimpse at something new.

Here in the Twin Cities, the west side of St Paul has been a center for Latino culture since the 1930's and Cinco de Mayo is not only a celebration of a day, but of Latino life in all its variations.
 

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+1


Here in the Twin Cities, the west side of St Paul has been a center for Latino culture since the 1930's and Cinco de Mayo is not only a celebration of a day, but of Latino life in all its variations.
I wonder how Latinos not of Mexican descent feel about celebrating Cinco de Mayo, in St. Paul or anywhere else. If I were from Argentina, for example, it would seem rather strange to me.

Some years ago I was in New York City on October 12. While in the US it's known as Columbus Day, in Latin America it's celebrated as Día de la Raza, or the birth of a new people. In typical NYC fashion, a fabulous parade was organized which traveled up Fifth Avenue. There were a ton of floats representing the myriad of people from all over Latin America who now make The Big Apple their home. To my mind, that was a more appropriate way of recognizing and celebrating Latinos in the US than the current Cinco de Mayo celebrations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I wonder how Latinos not of Mexican descent feel about celebrating Cinco de Mayo, in St. Paul or anywhere else. If I were from Argentina, for example, it would seem rather strange to me.

Some years ago I was in New York City on October 12. While in the US it's known as Columbus Day, in Latin America it's celebrated as Día de la Raza, or the birth of a new people. In typical NYC fashion, a fabulous parade was organized which traveled up Fifth Avenue. There were a ton of floats representing the myriad of people from all over Latin America who now make The Big Apple their home. To my mind, that was a more appropriate way of recognizing and celebrating Latinos in the US than the current Cinco de Mayo celebrations.
In my experience Latinos will love ANY opportunity to get together and PARTY. Why not Cinco De Mayo also? I think they like the fuss in SD about it and don't care if gringos think it is Mexican Independence day. Most think we are clueless anyway. LOL, Some sure prove that point very well NOB. Even some down here. LOL
 

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and in other news..........
Often mistaken for Mexican Independence Day (that's Sept. 16), Cinco de Mayo commemorates the 1862 Battle of Puebla between the victorious ragtag army of largely Mexican Indian soldiers against the invading French forces of Napoleon III. Mexican Americans, during the Chicano Movement of the 1970s, adopted the holiday for its David vs. Goliath storyline as motivation for civil rights struggles in Texas and California.
Over the years, the holiday has been adopted by beer companies as a way to penetrate the growing Latino market, even as the historical origins of the holiday remain largely forgotten.................
'Cinco de Mayo' _ plenty of beer, little history - Yahoo! News
yada, yada, yada... That´s Bud, That´s Cinco de Mayo.... Mexicans in the USA do not need a beer company (or 2 or 3) to tell them when when to have a party.
 

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Actually there is a NOB context as the General of that "rag tag" army, Zaragoza was born in what is now Texas, Gonzales I believe. In addition to Puebla of course, my understanding is that it was a local/regional celebration before being used by 1st the chicano movement and then Corona.
 

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I wonder how Latinos not of Mexican descent feel about celebrating Cinco de Mayo, in St. Paul or anywhere else. If I were from Argentina, for example, it would seem rather strange to me.

Some years ago I was in New York City on October 12. While in the US it's known as Columbus Day, in Latin America it's celebrated as Día de la Raza, or the birth of a new people. In typical NYC fashion, a fabulous parade was organized which traveled up Fifth Avenue. There were a ton of floats representing the myriad of people from all over Latin America who now make The Big Apple their home. To my mind, that was a more appropriate way of recognizing and celebrating Latinos in the US than the current Cinco de Mayo celebrations.
It becomes more like the State Fair, than a celebration of specifically Mexican culture. Peruvians can demonstrate their traditional crafts, costumes and dances, as well as Mexicans and Bolivians. Everyone is happy.

Well, maybe not today, when it POURED from about 1 pm till about a half hour ago, but still...
 

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I still don't understand how some Americans still celebrate the 5th and have not clue what is means. There are still Mexicans for that matter that don't know what Sept 16th is. While vacationing in Oaxaca last year and visiting my wifes family, we had a tequila fueled discussion about Mexican Independence. Not one of 16 people sitting at the table could tell me "whom" Mexico won its independence from. Answers ranged from France, to the US, to England. I was embarrassed for them.
 

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I still don't understand how some Americans still celebrate the 5th and have not clue what is means. There are still Mexicans for that matter that don't know what Sept 16th is. While vacationing in Oaxaca last year and visiting my wifes family, we had a tequila fueled discussion about Mexican Independence. Not one of 16 people sitting at the table could tell me "whom" Mexico won its independence from. Answers ranged from France, to the US, to England. I was embarrassed for them.
I'm surprised that none of them knew that Spain had ruled Mexico for 300 years. Didn't they study any history when they were in school?
 

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It becomes more like the State Fair, than a celebration of specifically Mexican culture. Peruvians can demonstrate their traditional crafts, costumes and dances, as well as Mexicans and Bolivians. Everyone is happy.

Well, maybe not today, when it POURED from about 1 pm till about a half hour ago, but still...
Maybe none of the non-Mexicans have any idea that Cinco de Mayo has its origins in Mexico, so it doesn't bother them to be sucked up into the celebration of a holiday that has nothing to do with them.
 

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Maybe none of the non-Mexicans have any idea that Cinco de Mayo has its origins in Mexico, so it doesn't bother them to be sucked up into the celebration of a holiday that has nothing to do with them.
Jee jee.

Probably not.

As for knowing the history of one's own country, there're ample numbers in any country who suffer from that particular form of ignorance!
 

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Jee jee.

Probably not.

As for knowing the history of one's own country, there're ample numbers in any country who suffer from that particular form of ignorance!
I also think the Pan-Latin-American celebration of Cinco de Mayo has something to do with the US tendency to categorize everyone from Latin America as Latino, thus minimizing the very real differences between the different nationalities.
 

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I certainly celebrated Drinko de Mayo, er I meant Cinco de Drinko, ...oh whatever. I'm sure the beer companies like it but the tequila makers do too. Mmmargaritas...
 

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Meet Miss Cinco de Mayo | San Diego 6 | Friday on San Diego Living

It appears these Mexican Americans feel Cinco de Mayo is a good way of celebrating Mexican and Latino culture and having a good time.
I agree -- the town I live in, Richmond CA, has shifted from black-majority to Latino-majority in the past 20 years, and Cinco de Mayo is big here -- banners and a big parade complete with charros on 23rd Street (I call it Avenida de la Revolucion, as in TJ). I surmise that it's just a way of affirming Latino/Mexican identity and taking advantage of that to party all day and night.

And, to some extent, it has been embraced by the majority culture in some parts of the country as sort of a Mexican St. Patrick's Day...another excuse to party.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I agree -- the town I live in, Richmond CA, has shifted from black-majority to Latino-majority in the past 20 years, and Cinco de Mayo is big here -- banners and a big parade complete with charros on 23rd Street (I call it Avenida de la Revolucion, as in TJ). I surmise that it's just a way of affirming Latino/Mexican identity and taking advantage of that to party all day and night.

And, to some extent, it has been embraced by the majority culture in some parts of the country as sort of a Mexican St. Patrick's Day...another excuse to party.
I do not see anything wrong with non Mexicans joining in the Cinco De Mayo celebrations. It brings them closer to all in the community and is a good way to intermingle with their Mexican neighbors or at least get a taste of it in a way. Who cares why it started in Calif. but it is there in a big way and as the Mexican American girls in the video stated; to them it is a celebration of the Mexican culture. Don't forget there now is many more times Mexican Americans in Calif. than Mexican immigrants and they both have their own cultural differences but the basics remain the same.
 

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I do not see anything wrong with non Mexicans joining in the Cinco De Mayo celebrations. It brings them closer to all in the community and is a good way to intermingle with their Mexican neighbors or at least get a taste of it in a way. Who cares why it started in Calif. but it is there in a big way and as the Mexican American girls in the video stated; to them it is a celebration of the Mexican culture. Don't forget there now is ma I am not.ny more times Mexican Americans in Calif. than Mexican immigrants and they both have their own cultural differences but the basics remain the same.
Did you think I was in any way critical of Cinco de Mayo in the US? I certainly am not, I was merely thinking of why it has become so big in recent years. There's little attention to September 16 up here, in contrast.
 

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and as the Mexican American girls in the video stated; to them it is a celebration of the Mexican culture. Don't forget there now is many more times Mexican Americans in Calif. than Mexican immigrants and they both have their own cultural differences but the basics remain the same.
That's a good point, that in many ways, Mexicans and Mexican-Americans have different cultures. I'll bet the girls in the video would be surprised at what they wouldn't find if one year they spent a Cinco de Mayo in Mexico.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Did you think I was in any way critical of Cinco de Mayo in the US? I certainly am not, I was merely thinking of why it has become so big in recent years. There's little attention to September 16 up here, in contrast.
Not you but other comments led me to think that some don't like it's commercialism, but isn't it true the Fourth of July is commercialized in the US and Mexicans in Mexicali and TJ like to party with us Americanos just like we do with them on that long weekend. The Mexicans [locals and tourists] fill the beaches and parks on the Fourth of July weekend in San Diego and they enjoy it.
 

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Not you but other comments led me to think that some don't like it's commercialism, but isn't it true the Fourth of July is commercialized in the US and Mexicans in Mexicali and TJ like to party with us Americanos just like we do with them on that long weekend. The Mexicans [locals and tourists] fill the beaches and parks on the Fourth of July weekend in San Diego and they enjoy it.
Lol...the breathtaking American commercialization of Christmas puts all the others in the shade!
 
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