Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,204 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I know that this board is not Chalapacentric and I refuse to post any comments on the Chapala fórums, since I live only part-time on the lake and the rest of the time in Chiapas and have a different perspective but , here goes anyway.

It´s not easy to find good Asian food in the Chapala Municipality on Lake Chapala so I thought I would inform readers of this fórum about Chopsticks Restaurant which features mainly Vietnamese food but also sells other Asian foods at times. I like their Vietnamese foods especially their to-die-for spring rolls but yesterday they served me up the Korean specialty Kimchi, a somewhat spicy cabbage stew that I dearly love and never even imagined I could buy in Mexico. Sincé I am a spicy food freak, I asked the proprietor, Betty Leung to provide me with some hot peppers to go with my take out order and when I ate this dish with those hot peppers at home I was blown away. Great food

Kimchi is not, at the present time on the menú so you have to order it in advance. I might add that once mont Betty serves uo dim sum by advanced reservation only and by that I mean "serious" advanced reservation as this monthly event is very popular and sells out quickly.

Many restaurants in the Chapala/Ajijic área bland down their food to appeal to the large "******" colony here so, if you call ahead for this food and you like spicy food, let them know .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,081 Posts
I'm not up to serious Kimchi: that is, my stomach isn't, but every other dish I've tried there is a real treat. It's an oasis of good Asian food in a sea of mediocre to terrible cuisine of that part of the world.

We snuck onto the reserved list for the last dim sun feast at the last minute. When you say you need to get on that reserved list quickly: this lastest one was filled for all three sittings about a half hour after it was posted on our email. What a feast!!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,684 Posts
Kimchi is primarily a condiment, or sometimes (in Chicago) served as a small 'side' dish. Many people make it at home. On behalf of my church, I watch-out for a refugee family of 5 who arrived last year from Myanmar ... and I've taken them to an Asian district in the city where they buy kimchi. There's a store not far from where I live which is owned by a Korean-American and the only product sold are many varieties of kimchi.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
472 Posts
Kimchi has not yet come to Pátzcuaro, and I doubt, even to Morelia. But I have made it at home. It's not exactly "authentic", but it tastes great.

Unfortunately, my last remaining jar of k'kakdugi (radish kimchi) decided to leave the nest the other morning, sailed out of the refrigerator, and met an untimely end on the tiled kitchen floor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,204 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Abot th expldfing raddich kimchi jar. Here we are in some Godforsaken hellhole in the swamps of Michocan 20 miles out of Patz cvuaro - I Cannot believe this - but this raddish glass container sitting in the refri blows its stack and deposits itself all over the kitchen. A marvelous story. What is fun is that m ost of the people from Patzcuaro wouldn´s know kimchi from Adam´s housecat and here is thIs ******* from some such place as Minnesota and living in the middle of nowhere in Michoacan blowing up his refri with a jar of raddish kimchi. A priceless tale.

Maybe you could share you kimchi récipe with us. If you do so, I will also share my récipe for Algerian, Tunisian and other North African stews with you-. If you like thia ides, we could have a lot of fun and, despite the fact that you are a ******* living in the woods in Michoacan and clearly having run away from the lawi n the U.S or some such place., tell me if you are interested and we can start an internet food club.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,204 Posts
Kimchi is primarily a condiment, or sometimes (in Chicago) served as a small 'side' dish. Many people make it at home. On behalf of my church, I watch-out for a refugee family of 5 who arrived last year from Myanmar ... and I've taken them to an Asian district in the city where they buy kimchi. There's a store not far from where I live which is owned by a Korean-American and the only product sold are many varieties of kimchi.
There is a small KoreaTown in Guadalajara where we occasionally go for some fun Korean food but since we moved to Chiapas a few months every year back in 2006, we don´t get up to Guadalajara from Lake Chapala that often. However, Longford´s comment reminded me that there is a largely Korean grocery in Guadalajara known as the Asian Market which not only has a huge selection of Korean and other Asian foods but a refrigerator filled with many various types of kimchi. Damn; I have to go back there. I have this visión , brought on by Anonimo and his exploding raddish kimchi story , that, here we will be cruising through Oaxaca State on our way from Lake Chapala to San Cristóbal and all of a sudden all this fermenting kimchi in the trunk blows up in the Oaxaca heat and, later, they find what´s left of our car and our decomposing bodies by the side of the road but not too decomposed as all that exploded kimchi covering our corpses will have acted as a preservative. All we will need will be some ice-cold Korean beer and everything will be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,081 Posts
My spouse once worked for a Korean-born entrepreneur. The annual party included his charming wife, who brought generous dishes of her home made kimchi. That dish of hers would not only preserve a corpse, but might cause spontaneous combustion of the living.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top