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Hi,

I've just got my general migrant visa to the UK and am planning to go in March.
It's very confusing though as of where to settle down and what to do for a living.
I have a BSc in Chemistry, and a Masters degree in Process Engineering.
I have done teaching before in high schools, and currently working in Health and Safety (Construction) in Dubai.
I am thinking of teaching chemistry (or Science) in high school, what do u guys think about this job, is it well-paid? how is it seen in the UK? Is it difficult to get this kind of job? what is the best tool to search for teaching jobs?
The reason I'm not considering a safety job because I think in the UK you need to have like a NEBOSH diploma to be qualified as a safety advisor
Please advise on what kind of jobs I should be looking for in the UK which suits my qualification and experience.

Thanks in advance

Kim
 

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Hi,
I've just got my general migrant visa to the UK and am planning to go in March.
It's very confusing though as of where to settle down and what to do for a living.
I have a BSc in Chemistry, and a Masters degree in Process Engineering.
I have done teaching before in high schools, and currently working in Health and Safety (Construction) in Dubai.
I am thinking of teaching chemistry (or Science) in high school, what do u guys think about this job, is it well-paid? how is it seen in the UK? Is it difficult to get this kind of job? what is the best tool to search for teaching jobs?
The reason I'm not considering a safety job because I think in the UK you need to have like a NEBOSH diploma to be qualified as a safety advisor
Please advise on what kind of jobs I should be looking for in the UK which suits my qualification and experience.
Does your visa allow you to work without permit or extra visa? This makes a big difference.
Assuming you are, for teaching in state schools, you generally need a teaching qualification (called QTS - qualified teacher status). Those without such a qualification from UK or EU/EEA can generally teach for up to 4 years as an unqualified teacher - then you have to get QTS. Now, and this is the tricky bit, Chemistry used to be a priority (shortage) subject and specialist teacher (one with a degree and teaching qualification in the subject) was in great demand (as most Chemists entered industry and earned twice as much), and in the absence of qualified UK applicants, schools were keen to recruit overseas teachers, either qualified or unqualified. All this has changed, as there has been a big rise in the numbers entering teacher training, including previously shortage subjects of Science and Maths. Schools no longer need to employ someone from overseas as there are more and more UK-qualified teachers keen to work in their schools. There will be still some supply teaching positions (substitute teaching), but it's unreliable and it's getting harder, even in London which used to be a happy hunting ground for teachers.
You don't need QTS to work in private (fee-paying) schools or as private tutors, and the best way to find jobs is through a teaching agency, of which there are many. TimePlan, for example, (used to) recruit a large number of overseas teachers.
Other than teaching, you can try suitable positions in industry or academic research, but jobs are hard to come by because of a large, and increasing, number of unemployed and recession.
 
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