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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My uncle (wife's side) is American born and bred and owns a couple of companies. He's seen my CV (software, management, technical authority) and is keen to sponsor me for one of his companies.

My wife is a nurse, ICU and CCU and is working towards NCLEX etc, so she should fall into the "we want you" type of visa.

If I understand correctly, both of these types of visas will get the spouse (and our 2-year old) in. Question is, is that right away, or would we have to spend time apart? If so, what sort of waiting period?

Alternatively we could each apply for our respective visas and not be dependant on the other. That is of course safer if, heaven forbid, we split, but are there any other reasons for or against joint or seperate visas?

Our finances aren't great at the moment, we have a couple of loans, but my Experian credit score last week was 999! The wife's is a lot lower. I've learnt that credit scores don't really translate across the Great Pond - even with the same credit scoring company! But in any case, would our loans affect any application? Is there anything we should know about repaying the loans whilst in the US (declarations to the loan company, will they demand repayment before we leave, etc), Actually probably only one loan since the other would likely be paid off by the time it happens.

Thanks for any help.
 

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My uncle (wife's side) is American born and bred and owns a couple of companies. He's seen my CV (software, management, technical authority) and is keen to sponsor me for one of his companies.

My wife is a nurse, ICU and CCU and is working towards NCLEX etc, so she should fall into the "we want you" type of visa.

If I understand correctly, both of these types of visas will get the spouse (and our 2-year old) in. Question is, is that right away, or would we have to spend time apart? If so, what sort of waiting period?

Alternatively we could each apply for our respective visas and not be dependant on the other. That is of course safer if, heaven forbid, we split, but are there any other reasons for or against joint or seperate visas?

Our finances aren't great at the moment, we have a couple of loans, but my Experian credit score last week was 999! The wife's is a lot lower. I've learnt that credit scores don't really translate across the Great Pond - even with the same credit scoring company! But in any case, would our loans affect any application? Is there anything we should know about repaying the loans whilst in the US (declarations to the loan company, will they demand repayment before we leave, etc), Actually probably only one loan since the other would likely be paid off by the time it happens.

Thanks for any help.
Applications for H1b open April. If either of you have a degree or 12 years experience in a job that would require a degree together with an employer who would like to sponsor you, be prepared to get your application in as soon as it opens. Biggest issue is that the spousal derivative, the H4, has no work permission attached. So you'd need 2 x H1bs for the same place in the same year. Pretty tough I would think.

The uncle could be a better bet going for an EB1 immigrant visa as executive management if you could possibly swing that. Lawyer territory. Choose your US immigration attorney carefully.

The loan stuff is irrelevant. Get an Amex now and that'll transfer. The rest of it .....well you're actually in a stronger position when you live abroad than when you're at home. Use you new negotiating position wisely. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. My wife has a BA and I have a BSc. We've both got 10+ years experience in our relevant fields.

The "opns in April" bit was new to me - I hadn't spotted that elsewhere! Guess I ought to read again. I'll look into the EB1 as well, though I'm not sure I'd fit into that category (only one way to find out, of course).

You mention getting an immigration attorney. Would that be a UK-based one, or an American-based one that specialises in Brits?

Amex... not been keen on it before but if needs must...

Thanks again.
 

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Thanks. My wife has a BA and I have a BSc. We've both got 10+ years experience in our relevant fields.

The "opns in April" bit was new to me - I hadn't spotted that elsewhere! Guess I ought to read again. I'll look into the EB1 as well, though I'm not sure I'd fit into that category (only one way to find out, of course).

You mention getting an immigration attorney. Would that be a UK-based one, or an American-based one that specialises in Brits?

Amex... not been keen on it before but if needs must...

Thanks again.
The H1b is numerically limited. It opens up in April for jobs to start in the next federal year (Oct). As soon as they receive too many applications, they shut the door, and after a few days and run a lottery on the ones that are already in. This year with the recession, they only closed it around Xmas. The year before, it opened in April and closed a week later. The earliest you can apply for an H1b visa for jobs starting Oct 2010 is April 2010. The quicker you get your application in afterthe opening date, the more likely it is that they won't be oversubscribed.

The EB1 category is if you can squeeze in in with your BIL. This would give you both instant permenant residence. For a lawyer, try AILA's Immigration Lawyer Search. The US-based ones are generally cheaper than the UK ones. No reason you need a face-to-face with them.

Amex is certainly a waste of time in the UK and Europe generally. But the transfer facility will give you an instant US credit score should you move here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Looks like I only fulfil two of the three basic requirements of EB1(A) sadly, and one of the further requirements "to continue work in the area of ‘extraordinary ability’" looks a bit shaky - my expertise is railway systems and computing, but my sponsor does none of the former. I suspect it would be better to apply for a visa that I'm likely to get, than to apply for one on shaky grounds and get it rejected and start all over again with a "failed" stamp beside my name.

Given that April is less than 3 months away, we need to get our backsides into gear!

Cheers
 
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