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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello! I'm still trying to figure out the best way for me to move to France...

I am considering taking classes at EICAR next fall, but I want to move to Paris in early spring. The only way I can figure out how to do this is if I am able to change visas before going to school, if I do choose to attend (depends on circumstances a year from now!)

If I were to get a long-stay visa and arrive in France in say, March, would I have to come back to the states to change it to a student visa, or could I change it there?

Also, if I were to get a job offer, would I have to return to the states to change to a work visa, or would the company deal with that in France?

And looking even further ahead, if the job only lasted a month or so, would I have to find a way to get back the long-stay visa to complete my year, or what?

Thank yoooou. :-D
 

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The way it works in France is that a visa is just to get into the country. Once you are here, you get a "titre de séjour." Usually that's the carte de séjour, but since the rules changed in June, there are certain categories that are exempted from getting a carte de séjour - at least for the first year.

If you change your status, the trick is to get that change in status reflected in your carte de séjour when it comes up for renewal.

On what basis would you be getting a long-stay visa? That would determine the type of titre de séjour you would get (even if that is just a validation of the visa in your passport). And what kind of titre de séjour you get determines if it can be renewed at all, and what sorts of changes you may or may not be able to make on renewal. This can also vary by the prefecture you are dealing with.

On a titre de séjour that doesn't include working privileges, chances are you couldn't get a job offer - or if you did, you would have to return to the States to apply for your visa.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The way it works in France is that a visa is just to get into the country. Once you are here, you get a "titre de séjour." Usually that's the carte de séjour, but since the rules changed in June, there are certain categories that are exempted from getting a carte de séjour - at least for the first year.

If you change your status, the trick is to get that change in status reflected in your carte de séjour when it comes up for renewal.

On what basis would you be getting a long-stay visa? That would determine the type of titre de séjour you would get (even if that is just a validation of the visa in your passport). And what kind of titre de séjour you get determines if it can be renewed at all, and what sorts of changes you may or may not be able to make on renewal. This can also vary by the prefecture you are dealing with.

On a titre de séjour that doesn't include working privileges, chances are you couldn't get a job offer - or if you did, you would have to return to the States to apply for your visa.
Cheers,
Bev
Hello, and thanks!
On what basis.... I don't know. I have a monthly income, so as long as I budget well, I can live anywhere (if they'll give me the visa). I already talked to the visa office here about my options. They didn't mention the titre de sejour or anything... I haven't heard that phrase before, actually. :) How would you get the kind that can be changed?

I already have a potential job offer on a film that will be done in Ireland, France, and Tokyo, but it's not definite and I won't know until I'm already in France, which is why I ask....
 

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Hello, and thanks!
On what basis.... I don't know. I have a monthly income, so as long as I budget well, I can live anywhere (if they'll give me the visa). I already talked to the visa office here about my options. They didn't mention the titre de sejour or anything... I haven't heard that phrase before, actually. :) How would you get the kind that can be changed?

I already have a potential job offer on a film that will be done in Ireland, France, and Tokyo, but it's not definite and I won't know until I'm already in France, which is why I ask....
While talking to the consulate about the "options" did you also talk about your chances? While nothing is impossible, it is highly unlikely you can get a long-stay visa unless you have an employer or family member to sponsor you, which basically means to vouch for the fact that you aren't just going over to soak up the local benefits. Just having a source of income to support yourself usually isn't enough to swing a visa, especially if you're of an age where you're likely to be tempted to work under the table should you run short of funds. What is critical is what you state as your "reason" for wanting a long-stay visa.

Working on a film probably only involves a short-stay visa, which is much easier for your employer to negotiate, in part because the employer more or less guarantees that you'll be clearing out when the filming is done.

The consulates aren't involved in the titres de séjour process, and so they have little or no information about it. (Or, as I found out, any information they do give out tends to be wrong.) Besides, it varies by prefecture once you get to France.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
While talking to the consulate about the "options" did you also talk about your chances? While nothing is impossible, it is highly unlikely you can get a long-stay visa unless you have an employer or family member to sponsor you, which basically means to vouch for the fact that you aren't just going over to soak up the local benefits. Just having a source of income to support yourself usually isn't enough to swing a visa, especially if you're of an age where you're likely to be tempted to work under the table should you run short of funds. What is critical is what you state as your "reason" for wanting a long-stay visa.

Working on a film probably only involves a short-stay visa, which is much easier for your employer to negotiate, in part because the employer more or less guarantees that you'll be clearing out when the filming is done.

The consulates aren't involved in the titres de séjour process, and so they have little or no information about it. (Or, as I found out, any information they do give out tends to be wrong.) Besides, it varies by prefecture once you get to France.
Cheers,
Bev
Mmm. Well I told him my situation, and he didn't say that I didn't have a chance. We talked about the options that fit my situation. I could have a family member vouch for me, as long as it doesn't cost them anything. I make enough money, and I certainly don't want a full time job. Or part time. I just want to live somewhere where I'm happy, is all. I have friends there, a boyfriend there, I enjoyed life there. I want to make contacts in the film industry through the film school, because eventually I want to become a dual citizen, maybe even expatriate. I don't know. I want to give myself that option.

So I could get a long stay and then have to talk to someone in the prefecture once I get there about what kind of titres de sejour I have to get?
 
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