Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
221 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently applied for renewal of my Carte de Sejour and the process was much easier than I expected. After visiting the prefecture, I found a better, cheaper health insurance policy and want to change companies. Do I need to notify the prefecture of the change? Thanks for any information.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
18,642 Posts
I recently applied for renewal of my Carte de Sejour and the process was much easier than I expected. After visiting the prefecture, I found a better, cheaper health insurance policy and want to change companies. Do I need to notify the prefecture of the change? Thanks for any information.
I assume you're talking about private expat health insurance and not a mutuelle. If that's the case, I don't belie e you need to advise the Prefecture. If you take the new policy and cancel the old one, you will still have health cover (assuming it is to the same standard), so you still meet the requirements. However, if you don't yet have your new CDS, then if I were you I would let them know.

Details of your new policy, or any subsequent one you take out between now and then, will of course be required for your next CDS application.

BTW, glad you managed to get the CDS application sorted - it won't cause you as much anxiety next time around. Did you do it on your own, or did you end up finding someone to help you?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
50,415 Posts
I wouldn't bother trying to notify the prefecture. (It will just "confuse" them at this point.) As EH has said, you'll need to show your proof of insurance next year when you renew again. But until then, you're free to change insurers as you wish.

These administrative things get easier as time goes on.
Cheers,
Bev
 

·
Registered
From the US...lived in Canada, UK, & France
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
I wouldn't bother trying to notify the prefecture. (It will just "confuse" them at this point.) As EH has said, you'll need to show your proof of insurance next year when you renew again. But until then, you're free to change insurers as you wish.

These administrative things get easier as time goes on.
Cheers,
Bev
Our Prefecture has not asked us for proof of health insurance for a while now when we renew our Cartes des Sejour. We bring the proof with us every year, but after the first two years, the Prefecture stopped requesting it.

I finally went to the CPAM office to sign up for French health care insurance a week and a half ago. I waited waaaaaay to long to do it because I thought it would be painful to deal with one more immense French bureaucracy. A mistake of rather epic proportion, as it turns out. Assuming that we did everything correctly, it was easy and quick (very un-French <s>)! I will document what we did and how it worked here as soon as we receive our social security card provisoire...which should be in a week and a half or so.

Best of luck.

Ray
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
18,642 Posts
Our Prefecture has not asked us for proof of health insurance for a while now when we renew our Cartes des Sejour. We bring the proof with us every year, but after the first two years, the Prefecture stopped requesting it.

I finally went to the CPAM office to sign up for French health care insurance a week and a half ago. I waited waaaaaay to long to do it because I thought it would be painful to deal with one more immense French bureaucracy. A mistake of rather epic proportion, as it turns out. Assuming that we did everything correctly, it was easy and quick (very un-French <s>)! I will document what we did and how it worked here as soon as we receive our social security card provisoire...which should be in a week and a half or so.

Best of luck.

Ray
Maybe not so much un-French as not in line with your expectations? For most inactives it's beneficial to join the French system and France is extremely generous in allowing us to do so easily. Hopefully you will get your attestation in the not too distant future.

It's funny, isn't it? It was actually inactive EU citizens that used to have to wait 5 years to join, whereas it's been open to non-EU inactives for ages. But then again, that probably also flies in the face of expectations and I know that many non-EU inactives in France simply didn't believe they could access the French health system.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
50,415 Posts
It's funny, isn't it? It was actually inactive EU citizens that used to have to wait 5 years to join, whereas it's been open to non-EU inactives for ages. But then again, that probably also flies in the face of expectations and I know that many non-EU inactives in France simply didn't believe they could access the French health system.
But don't forget - it has only been the last couple of years (with PUMA in place) that inactive non-EU types could enroll in the sécu system. That was a big change, because it wasn't that long ago when only those with French pensions would/could be carried on the sécu. Other than that, you had to prove you were ineligible for any other source of basic insurance.

The change to a strictly residential based eligibility was a real boon to lots of folks - not just the retired foreigners.
Cheers,
Bev
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
18,642 Posts
But don't forget - it has only been the last couple of years (with PUMA in place) that inactive non-EU types could enroll in the sécu system. That was a big change, because it wasn't that long ago when only those with French pensions would/could be carried on the sécu. Other than that, you had to prove you were ineligible for any other source of basic insurance.

The change to a strictly residential based eligibility was a real boon to lots of folks - not just the retired foreigners.
Cheers,
Bev
This is incorrect, Bev, as I've pointed out previously and we've even had the occasional Americans through here who joined (via CMU de base as it was then) quite some time ago. I'm sorry, but you are mistaken, as I've pointed out several times over the years.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
50,415 Posts
Under the old CMU system, you had to have no access to another insurance. (And for those here in France, you had to have some means of contributing to the system - via work, benefits or a family member.) But honestly, at this point the system is residence based, so what does it matter what the "old" system was or when exactly the new system kicked in?
Cheers,
Bev
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
221 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks, as always, for your time and all the helpful information. I did find someone to accompany me to the Prefecture, and was very grateful because things had changed considerably since last year. We arrived 2 hours earlier than last year and were at the end of a very long line to enter the building, compared to a fraction of that number last year when we arrived at 8:30 (the office opens at 9). A second large queue formed in the area reserved for auto licenses, filled, apparently, with people attempting to "beat" the official line. The door opening was a rush to make it to the official document renewal line, with many people turned away and needing to try again the next day. Thanks to my status as a person with a mo ility issue and my friend's persistence, I made it. Apparently, they are implementing an appointment system soon.
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
18,642 Posts
Under the old CMU system, you had to have no access to another insurance. (And for those here in France, you had to have some means of contributing to the system - via work, benefits or a family member.) But honestly, at this point the system is residence based, so what does it matter what the "old" system was or when exactly the new system kicked in?
Cheers,
Bev
No, that is absolutely not correct. Sorry, but you are mistaken. What you couldn't have was access to another country's public health system (so, Australians, for example, could access CMU de base simply because the Australian Medicare system does not operate outside Australia), but you were expected to carry private health insurance at the time of application. I know what you say was always your point of view, but it wasn't correct and that has been demonstrated on various occasions on this very forum.

Agree that it's no longer relevant given the new system.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
50,415 Posts
What you couldn't have was access to another country's public health system (so, Australians, for example, could access CMU de base simply because the Australian Medicare system does not operate outside Australia), but you were expected to carry private health insurance at the time of application. I know what you say was always your point of view, but it wasn't correct and that has been demonstrated on various occasions on this very forum.
I don't see that I'm saying anything different here. The Australian Medicare system is not accessible in France. Nor is the US Medicare system for retirees. That means that Aussies and Americans do not have access to any form of medical insurance. But prior to the implementation of PUMA (whenever that was) Americans (at least) were required to show proof of private medical insurance as part of their titre de séjour renewal each and every year. That appears to have been abolished with the implementation of PUMA.

But as you say, it's all irrelevant now due to the change in the rules.
Cheers,
Bev
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
18,642 Posts
I don't see that I'm saying anything different here. The Australian Medicare system is not accessible in France. Nor is the US Medicare system for retirees. That means that Aussies and Americans do not have access to any form of medical insurance. But prior to the implementation of PUMA (whenever that was) Americans (at least) were required to show proof of private medical insurance as part of their titre de séjour renewal each and every year. That appears to have been abolished with the implementation of PUMA.

But as you say, it's all irrelevant now due to the change in the rules.
Cheers,
Bev
Yes, but they could still apply for CMU de base, even with their private medical insurance. That is what I'm saying. Plus, if the policy had exclusions etc (most do), they could also apply.

EU citizens, OTOH, were supposed to wait 5 years, and the primary reason for introducing PUMA was to overcome precisely that issue (EU citizens faring worse than non-EU for health cover in France). You may recall that Conky2 (a Brit) was originally refused, but then accepted on review of his file - lots of others weren't so lucky and the majority of inactive EU citizens here just waited the 5 years (some still think they have to wait 5 years).

We had this argument 7 years ago and I just gave up on the forum for a while because of it.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
50,415 Posts
Thanks, as always, for your time and all the helpful information. I did find someone to accompany me to the Prefecture, and was very grateful because things had changed considerably since last year. We arrived 2 hours earlier than last year and were at the end of a very long line to enter the building, compared to a fraction of that number last year when we arrived at 8:30 (the office opens at 9). A second large queue formed in the area reserved for auto licenses, filled, apparently, with people attempting to "beat" the official line. The door opening was a rush to make it to the official document renewal line, with many people turned away and needing to try again the next day. Thanks to my status as a person with a mo ility issue and my friend's persistence, I made it. Apparently, they are implementing an appointment system soon.
I'm glad to hear you got through it all OK. That thing about things changing from year to year is kind of par for the course, I guess. As we've said so often, each prefecture has its own ways of doing things. Some are all set up with online appointment systems - others still use the "queue up at 5 or 6 am" approach. (And having a persistent friend always helps in situations like this.)

Anyhow, congrats on making it through one more time. Next year will be somewhat easier (though still probably a little different).
Cheers,
Bev
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top