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Hello all,

I recently moved to France with my French-American husband at the end of August. I was wondering what's the process like to sign up for sécurité sociale? Do I have to prove 3 months of residence before sending my application, or since I'm a conjointe d'un français I can waive this requirement?

Any inputs/sharing of experience would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks in advance! Hope you're having a lovely day! :)
 

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Depends a bit on where you're moving from. (Assuming both you and your husband moved here in August and have no existing claim on the French health care system.)

If you're here on a spouse visa, you should have some form of health insurance based on your visa. If you husband has been outside of France prior to this move, he will also need some sort of private health care coverage.

You both need to establish 3 months of residence before you can apply to the CPAM for the French national system. And, I think they may want proof that you have some form of health insurance when you apply (though I'm not sure of that). Nationality doesn't confer any automatic right to the national plan. Residence does qualify you.

If you have a spouse visa, you need to contact the OFII to "validate" your visa into a residence permit. Not sure in the current conditions what they are doing about the contrat d'integration - the classes, medical appointment and a couple other miscellaneous requirements - but that probably needs to be done first (i.e. within 3 months of your arrival here) anyhow.

If you're not on a visa, you need to contact the prefecture about getting a titre de séjour (residence permit), which you will need to register with CPAM.
 

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Depends a bit on where you're moving from. (Assuming both you and your husband moved here in August and have no existing claim on the French health care system.)...
And, if that is not true, then please update with your status and your husband's status. For example, are either of you working, has he been living elsewhere in the EU up until now, etc.
 

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Since you said you're planning to settle the following probably doesn't apply to you, but:

in case you're not planning to stay all that long, do be aware that a Carte Vitale can be a tax trap.
What I mean by that is that in order to get a Carte Vitale you need a tax number and need to show that you're a resident. By virtue of being a resident, you'll be liable for the 17.2% social tax (it's actually the sum of three components) on your worldwide income. If you're already paying taxes elsewhere, you may not be thrilled about that.

So if you're not in France all that long, the benefits of the Carte Vitale may not be worth the hassle — travel insurance could be the way to go.
 

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Since you said you're planning to settle the following probably doesn't apply to you, but:

in case you're not planning to stay all that long, do be aware that a Carte Vitale can be a tax trap.
What I mean by that is that in order to get a Carte Vitale you need a tax number and need to show that you're a resident. By virtue of being a resident, you'll be liable for the 17.2% social tax (it's actually the sum of three components) on your worldwide income. If you're already paying taxes elsewhere, you may not be thrilled about that.

So if you're not in France all that long, the benefits of the Carte Vitale may not be worth the hassle — travel insurance could be the way to go.
Not strictly true and you do not need a tax number to get a carte vitale. Social taxes are dependent on many things, including, but not limited to, tax agreements.
 

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What I mean by that is that in order to get a Carte Vitale you need a tax number and need to show that you're a resident. By virtue of being a resident, you'll be liable for the 17.2% social tax (it's actually the sum of three components) on your worldwide income. If you're already paying taxes elsewhere, you may not be thrilled about that
Hi, do you have a reference for that? Where does it state you're liable for social tax? Thanks

Edit: cross-posted with EH
 

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Hello all,

I recently moved to France with my French-American husband at the end of August. I was wondering what's the process like to sign up for sécurité sociale? Do I have to prove 3 months of residence before sending my application, or since I'm a conjointe d'un français I can waive this requirement?

Any inputs/sharing of experience would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks in advance! Hope you're having a lovely day! :)
Even if your husband already has a carte vitale, these days each partner requires their own Carte Vitale and their own (social security) number? You can no longer ride on the back of your husband(s cover and will have to provide evidence of 3 months legal residence in order to join the French health system. This is actually also the case if you are French and your cover has lapsed, unless you are working in France or have a French pension.
 

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Hi, do you have a reference for that? Where does it state you're liable for social tax? Thanks

Edit: cross-posted with EH
It's sort of right, but not quite.

That 17% stuff is often called "cotisations" however it isn't really a "social" tax in the sense most folks think of that. Paying that tax really has no bearing on whether or not you are eligible for the French health care system.

And, it depends on the source of your foreign (i.e. non-French) income (country and type of income) as to how much you are charged - anywhere from nothing at all to one, two or three of the parts that make up that 17%.
 

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For anyone interested, here's the Wikipedia page showing the rates for the first component of those "social contributions" depending on income type:
fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contribution_sociale_g%C3%A9n%C3%A9ralis%C3%A9e#Taux

If I understand the official tax simulators, if you've paid foreign taxes on your foreign income, you can deduct it from your French tax (up to the limit of that French tax) but not from those "social contributions". Let's say you paid €5K in foreign tax and that your French tax is €4K plus €3K in social contributions: what you paid overseas will offset the €4K, but you still owe the €3K. Not a tax expert, only my vague understanding, and everyone's situation is unique.

Didn't mean to take the original convo off-track, it would be fascinating to have a thread just about this.
 

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For anyone interested, here's the Wikipedia page showing the rates for the first component of those "social contributions" depending on income type:
fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contribution_sociale_g%C3%A9n%C3%A9ralis%C3%A9e#Taux

If I understand the official tax simulators, if you've paid foreign taxes on your foreign income, you can deduct it from your French tax (up to the limit of that French tax) but not from those "social contributions". Let's say you paid €5K in foreign tax and that your French tax is €4K plus €3K in social contributions: what you paid overseas will offset the €4K, but you still owe the €3K. Not a tax expert, only my vague understanding, and everyone's situation is unique.

Didn't mean to take the original convo off-track, it would be fascinating to have a thread just about this.
Actually, that's not quite how it works. It depends on the source of the income.

France doesn't allow you to directly deduct foreign taxes paid from your taxes due. What they do in some cases (often, but not always, pensions) is to grant you a credit against your French taxes of the amount the foreign income would have raised your French taxes - so it doesn't really matter if you paid foreign taxes on the amount or not. (That's how it works for US pensions - SS and IRA distributions.) A US pension is exempt from the "social charges" - by treaty, I guess.

For other sources of foreign income there are formulas for whatever allowances they give you. I get a German pension and and they give me some "assumed" credit for German taxes that should have been taken out of the amount before it was paid to me. Then, the German pension is subject to 8% of the "social charges" rather than the full amount. I assume that is somehow by treaty or some other agreement.

Other forms of foreign income are handled each in their own way (foreign investments, dividends, etc.).
 
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