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Hello,

I'm married to a Mexican citizen and we are considering a possible move to Mexico in the not very near future. I'm 30 and we have a 1 year old son. I'm a lawyer and practice immigration law. I am mostly concerned about finding work and making enough money to send my kid(s) to a good school and visit my family in the US often. I would like to be prepared for the move to Mexico and am willing to get another degree or develop a law specialization that would be better used there.

I would like any information people have about any work that US lawyers can do in Mexico. I could probably practice some immigration law. I also considered developing a specialty in Trust, Wills, and Estates since there is a growing retiree population in Mexico. has anyone used a US Lawyer in mexico?

If I tried another career path other than being a lawyer, do you have suggestions for one that might work?

Thanks for all your valuable input!
 

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Oh boy! You must realize that your law degree will be of no use in Mexico, where the law is based upon Napoleonic Law, not Common Law. You would have to be fluent in Spanish and start all over again in a Mexican university. In Mexico, a lawyer from the USA is a tourist. As the wife of a Mexican citizen, you may be able to gain naturalization after two years on an FM2 visa, but, in the meantime, will have to qualify for, and maintain that status. Getting permission from immigration to work, at any job; and it must be specified as to job and location, can be difficult, especially in the present economic crisis. Again, you certainly won't be able to work in the legal field. Minimum wage for unskilled labor is about the equivalent of $5,00 USD per day, not per hour. You don't say where you plan to settle, so I can't even begin to suggest alternatives. The tourist industry, restaurant business and many others are in the tank and there is no bright light on the horizon for the immediate future. I trust that you have your child's birth registered with the nearest Mexican Consulate by now, so that will help your case with INM. Private schools are very expensive and not available in all areas, as you can imagine. I know this isn't an encouraging welcome to the forum, but that seems to be the present situation. I'm assuming that your husband is illegal, forcing you to make the move or separate. We've had a similar situation in our family and the outcome was not good. You may face many cultural challenges on top of the economic/employment/education challenges. I wish you luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
RVGringo- Thank you for your comments. I am aware that I will not be able to practice law in Mexico, as I am not licensed to practice Mexican law. I do however believe that I would be able to practice US immigration law by representing people at the US consulate applying for their greencard, waivers, visas, etc.

Going from telling me that I can't practice Mexican law to telling me that I will make $5 a day as an unskilled laborer seems like quite a jump. I am fluent in Spanish and do have both a bachelor's degree and Juris doctorate. I would think that I am at least qualified for for a job such as teaching.

My point in posting was to get some advice on what steps I might want to take to prepare myself so that I will be able to be employed. Getting a master's degree in education, becoming an RN, etc.
 

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There are opportunities for expats to legally work in Mexico. It is not a simple process but I have managed to maneuver through it all. Many think you will be limited to teaching English and real estate but in reality there are many companies in Mexico that would consider hiring you under the right circumstances. It helps a lot if you are fluent in Spanish, professional and can offer a unique, cross border skill.

You most likely will earn less than NOB to start but you may also find opportunities that you never had before and eventually end up in business for yourself.

Do your research and don't be afraid to try. You only live once...
 

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I didn't suggest that you would, if hired, make minimum wage, but did intend it to show the disparity between US and Mexican scales. I have no idea if you could 'represent' anyone at the consulate; I have my doubts. They don't even tell applicants why they have been denied; even after several attempts. Whatever you do will require the support of an employer in the initial applications to INM for working permission once you have the appropriate visa. My only caution is that it wasn't easy in the 'good times' and won't be easy now.
 

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Work for US immigration attorney

This young attorney has a skill that many large corporations and business focused law firms n Mexico would love to avail themselves of for their professional staff travel and relocation to the US. She should find a top-flight international legal recruiter to represent her.

The laws must be followed to the letter for professional level Mexicans to even travel to conferences in the US. This level of professional will not be found standing in line at the consulate to get 'permission' for a 3 day conference.

Physician friends have their business lawyers handle their cnference specific visas, and their vacation travel visas. One young couple we know out of Monterrey were greatly effected when they arrived at CI paint in Cleveland as chemical engineers and his papers were inorder but hers weren't. She couldn't work for the entire 3 years they were located there. They had to get by on one income, decided to begin their family because of problem and she lost her professional credentials with the company. a career gone. The parent company in Monterrey hired a US law firm to do all subsequent work immigration issues and an attorney from that law firm eventually relocated himself to Monterey aligned with a Mexican law firm.

I also know of a Morelia government director turned back at the airport in San Diego for lack of one piece of paper. He was to be the keynote speaker at an environmental conference. So maybe the government of whereever she is located might be interested.

Come at it from the angle that you have a salable skill which few in Mexico can match.:)
 

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Great suggestions! The OP has time on her side to start investigating some of those possibilities while still in the USA.
 

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Hi there,

I realize this is an old thread, but I'm wondering if you and your husband moved to Mexico, and if you are practicing law. I am an immigration lawyer in the US and my husband and I (with our 14 month old son) want to move to Mexico. We are both US citizens and I speak fluent Spanish. We are interested in moving to the Puerto Vallarta area (specifically to the north bay--Bucerias/Sayulita). I know there is a lot of real estate work in this area, with expats 'regularizing' their properties. Wondering if you have any tips/ideas/advice for work for a US attorney. Thanks you!

Hello,

I'm married to a Mexican citizen and we are considering a possible move to Mexico in the not very near future. I'm 30 and we have a 1 year old son. I'm a lawyer and practice immigration law. I am mostly concerned about finding work and making enough money to send my kid(s) to a good school and visit my family in the US often. I would like to be prepared for the move to Mexico and am willing to get another degree or develop a law specialization that would be better used there.

I would like any information people have about any work that US lawyers can do in Mexico. I could probably practice some immigration law. I also considered developing a specialty in Trust, Wills, and Estates since there is a growing retiree population in Mexico. has anyone used a US Lawyer in mexico?

If I tried another career path other than being a lawyer, do you have suggestions for one that might work?

Thanks for all your valuable input!
 

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Hi there,

I realize this is an old thread, but I'm wondering if you and your husband moved to Mexico, and if you are practicing law. I am an immigration lawyer in the US and my husband and I (with our 14 month old son) want to move to Mexico. We are both US citizens and I speak fluent Spanish. We are interested in moving to the Puerto Vallarta area (specifically to the north bay--Bucerias/Sayulita). I know there is a lot of real estate work in this area, with expats 'regularizing' their properties. Wondering if you have any tips/ideas/advice for work for a US attorney. Thanks you!
More like an ancient thread! Since it is over three and a half years old, I doubt the original poster will be reading your post. I suggest starting a new thread to make your inquiries.
 

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FYI...there are already MANY U.S. lawyers at the San Ysidro border doing the above; they all have large signs at the border crossing as well as many TV ads on the Spanish TV stations in TJ. Based on how many of those advertisements I've seen I would say that field in San Diego/Tijuana is probably already oversaturated. Many of these lawyers have been doing this for years and have branded their names.
 

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FYI...there are already MANY U.S. lawyers at the San Ysidro border doing the above; they all have large signs at the border crossing as well as many TV ads on the Spanish TV stations in TJ. Based on how many of those advertisements I've seen I would say that field in San Diego/Tijuana is probably already oversaturated. Many of these lawyers have been doing this for years and have branded their names.

The poster was asking about the Vallarta area, not San Ysidro. Very different.
 
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