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Done it in many other countries and I have spoken to people who said you could do it a year or so ago.

Is it still possible?

Otherwise someone said you can get a friend to buy it and they write a letter stating you have permission to drive it.
 

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Done it in many other countries and I have spoken to people who said you could do it a year or so ago.

Is it still possible?

Otherwise someone said you can get a friend to buy it and they write a letter stating you have permission to drive it.
Have you posted your message on the wrong forum?
 

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Done it in many other countries and I have spoken to people who said you could do it a year or so ago.

Is it still possible?

Otherwise someone said you can get a friend to buy it and they write a letter stating you have permission to drive it.
I very much doubt it.

I checked the conditions to renew the paperwork of a car in Mexico City and they require resident visas (temporary or permanent) and proof of address at least 3 months old.
 

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I very much doubt it.

I checked the conditions to renew the paperwork of a car in Mexico City and they require resident visas (temporary or permanent) and proof of address at least 3 months old.
Do you mean "at least 3 months old" or "less than 3 months old". Most times, when proof of address, is required they want a recent utility bill.
 

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If you got money you can buy it ..... but registration may be an issue depending on the State
Well, if you buy a car you don't want to drive it illegally, so having the money to buy a car is a necessary but not sufficient condition to use it, which I think is what the OP has in mind :)
 

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Here's the deal in the Yucatan . . . You can purchase a car in the Yucatan on a tourist visa, but NOT register it or get insurance I your name, though as someone has said, you can drive it with permission from the person who has registered it. You need their written permission to drive it, even though you own it. The vehicle must be registered to get insurance.
However, if you visit on a tourist visa, but own a home in Mexico held in a corporation that you are a director of, the corporation may purchase, register and insure the car, and as a director, you may legally use it.
If you visit on a tourist visa and own a home held in a bank fideicomiso, you may purchase and own a car, but not register it in your own name (ie. Back to paragraph one).
So, in a nutshell, you can buy a home in Mexico (using a fideicomiso), but NOT legally register or insure in your name a car you have purchased.
Get it?
 

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I should have added "I think," because the rules change frequently and they make little to no sense. I mean you can buy a house on a tourist visa, but not a car?
 

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Actually, you don‘t really buy the house; you pay for it and create a trust that owns the house for your benefit. It is sort of like having a corporation own a car that you may drive.
For the best of both worlds, get a residence visa and you will be able to register the car. In several years, you will be eligible for naturalization and be able to buy your own house from the bank trust and eliminate their annual fees.
 

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Actually, you don‘t really buy the house; you pay for it and create a trust that owns the house for your benefit. It is sort of like having a corporation own a car that you may drive.
For the best of both worlds, get a residence visa and you will be able to register the car. In several years, you will be eligible for naturalization and be able to buy your own house from the bank trust and eliminate their annual fees.
I assume you are talking about buying houses near the coast or the border? In the interior, you actually buy the house, no trust involved, no annual fees involved except property taxes.
 

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Yes, I assumed coastal or border areas where a trust is required. I should have made it clearer.
Thanks for the clarification.
I figured you knew. I just wanted to clarify it for others who might be less familiar with Article 27, Paragraph I, of the constitution.

Incidentally, for citizens either by birth or naturalization, there are no such restrictions.
 
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