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Hi,

I am a 25 year old American, and I am very interested in earning a masters degree in Europe, and quite a few of the program I'm looking at are in Germany. I've been planning on this for awhile, but I recently started dating someone who is HIV positive. He knows of my plans and is also interested in earning a graduate degree in Europe.

However, I'm obviously worried about whether he will be able to obtain sufficient health care coverage in Germany. I've read conflicting information about what students are entitled to. On some websites, I've read that all students can enroll in the public health insurance program, but on others, I've read that this is very basic and students are advised to supplement it with a private plan. Then, of course, I've read that anyone with a pre-existing condition is likely to be denied coverage in Germany.

He's of course willing to pay a higher premium, and it's not like he'd be looking to simply get to Europe to take care of a perceived "free health care" system. He has already lived abroad in Africa and is even fluent in French, so on paper, he would seem to be a productive citizen who could contribute to Germany, especially because we're both warm to the idea of staying on and working in Germany afterwards with our advanced degrees.

So, if anyone has any experience with this issue in Germany (or pre-existing conditions in general), I'd appreciate any and all advice!

Thanks so much :)
 

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I've read that this is very basic and students are advised to supplement it with a private plan.
I am not sure what "very basic" is supposed to mean, but in the 27 years that I lived in Germany I never ever saw or paid a doctors bill, so I would say it is not too bad.
Not sure what kind of treatment he needs, but it is most likely covered with the public insurance.

Advising students to get a private plans sounds weird to me, since this is very unusual for students (unless they have rich parents). This might be different for foreigners, but as a German you need to have a certain income to even be eligible for private health insurance.
 

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As your partner has HIV tested positive before applying for any insurance (from your post, I assume he is not currently covered and is paying all treatments himself), it is categorised as a pre-existing condition. In general, it's very likely for any insurer to exclude AIDS/HIV treatments of your partner, or even reject his application.
Even if he is tested positive after joining a plan, it must be proved that the test is done after the waiting period before he can file any claims re HIV.
 

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Hi,

I am a 25 year old American, and I am very interested in earning a masters degree in Europe, and quite a few of the program I'm looking at are in Germany. I've been planning on this for awhile, but I recently started dating someone who is HIV positive. He knows of my plans and is also interested in earning a graduate degree in Europe.

However, I'm obviously worried about whether he will be able to obtain sufficient health care coverage in Germany. I've read conflicting information about what students are entitled to. On some websites, I've read that all students can enroll in the public health insurance program, but on others, I've read that this is very basic and students are advised to supplement it with a private plan. Then, of course, I've read that anyone with a pre-existing condition is likely to be denied coverage in Germany.

He's of course willing to pay a higher premium, and it's not like he'd be looking to simply get to Europe to take care of a perceived "free health care" system. He has already lived abroad in Africa and is even fluent in French, so on paper, he would seem to be a productive citizen who could contribute to Germany, especially because we're both warm to the idea of staying on and working in Germany afterwards with our advanced degrees.

So, if anyone has any experience with this issue in Germany (or pre-existing conditions in general), I'd appreciate any and all advice!

Thanks so much :)

The public insurance companies do not usually ask any health questions at all when you apply. I think they cost around €55/month for students, same for international students.

Private insurers do ask about existing conditions and it is unlikely that he'd be able to get private insurance being HIV positive.
 

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Any idea how to proceed for a 30 years old poz student? The statutory insurance companies tell me that because of my age I can't take this type of insurance as a student
 

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I replied to your other posting about this topic.
You should not rely on information from the insurers themselves - for them you are a loss-maker and thus they want to discourage you from joining. Contact a good health insurance consultant instead!
 

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Hi EuroPhile4986
Did you find any solution for your fiend after moving to Germany? I am at the same situation as you. I will appreciate your help! Thanks
 

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I can't get any information on what happens if you are a foreign student from a non-EU country with a pre-existing condition and over age 30 upon arrival in Germany. It seems you are required to have insurance to study, but since you are only eligible at that age for private insurance, and private insurers won't take you with a pre-existing condition, or won't cover it, you are effectively banned from study.
 

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I find that surprising, but it's not something I need to know so haven't researched in detail. It's not like graduate students are all under 30. I would dig a little deeper, maybe ask the university's foreign student office directly, or talk to an insurance broker.

Quite possibly it really is the case that they are effectively keeping out foreign students with a potentially expensive pre-existing medical condition - while cruel, there's a certain economic logic to that decision.
 
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