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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I have gotten so many different answers (immigration lawyer, prefecture & embassy) and really hope someone here can clarify this: My husband has his 10 year carte de sejour and when he applied for his French citizenship, they denied it because his wife (me) is living in Canada. The reason why I am still living in Canada and only coming to France on tourist visas is because we were informed that once he is French, it is the easiest way for me to receive my carte de sejour. Now with their response, you can imagine the confusion I am experiencing. What are our options now? Can I still get a carte de sejour through my husband having the 10 year carte de sejour? I have a bank account in Paris to show them if that helps the process. Thank you all for any information that may help!
 

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Before you can get a carte de séjour, you first have to get a long-stay visa to move to France. The visa is the document that allows you to enter France, the carte de séjour is more or less a "residence permit" once you are there. But to get any sort of a titre or carte de séjour you have to have a properly validated visa.

If your husband did not get his French nationality, then he will have to apply through the OFII to sponsor you for a visa as described here: OFII - Office Français de l’Immigration et de l’Intégration

If and when he gets his French nationality, he would have to apply for a spouse visa for you in any event: OFII - Office Français de l’Immigration et de l’Intégration At a minimum, he would have to get a livret de famille (though that may happen as part of the process of naturalization - and may be why they turned him down given that you are not living with him in France).

Once you arrive in France on a spouse visa, there is a whole drill to go through, primarily the OFII visit and signing of the contract of integration. And then you get an actual carte de séjour.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Bev, thank you for your quick and helpful response. "If your husband did not get his French nationality, then he will have to apply through the OFII to sponsor you for a visa as described here: OFII - Office Français de l’Immigration et de l’Intégration". I looked at this online and it looks fairly straight forward. Do I still need a long term visa for this?
Thank you again, Heidi
 

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Yes, you still need a long-stay visa - it will be in the "regroupment familliale" category. But where it says:

summons of family member(s) to the French Consulate or to the OFII mission (Turkey, Tunisia, Morocco), to take care of departure formalities.
That's where you will go to the consulate to submit your visa application. You'll need the usual i.d. documents (birth certificate, passport, etc.), but I suspect the Consulate will give you a list of the required documents when they "summon" you to come see them. The process should go pretty quickly.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok, thanks Bev! I am in Paris now but am going back to Toronto for Christmas and will start the application for the long term visa. I really appreciate your help. It has been over a year of back and forth and we were highly misinformed by an immigration lawyer that told us to wait until my husband received his french citizenship and then for me to apply for a carte de sejour in Paris. If I knew what I knew now, I could have started this process months ago. We had no idea his citizenship could be denied due to me not living here. I really hope that the long term visa and then OFII process doesn't take too long but at least we know now what direction to take. Thanks again!
 
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