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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi Folks

I am Australian with a Polish (EU and Aust Passport) wife and a 9 yo child. We have lived before (residence secondaire) in France about 9 years ago - on the back of my work in Switzerland.

We would like to return for a year, put our girl in a French school, and was wondering how difficult or otherwise it would be spend a year (maybe more) back in France.

Would really appreciate any feedback. Many Thanks
Terry
 

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Technically speaking, you have the right to accompany your EU-national wife while she is "exercising her EU rights" in France. (Interesting phrasing, don't you think?)

The way it works is that she moves to France and then you (and the child, if the child doesn't have an EU passport) apply at the prefecture for a carte de séjour as the family members of an EU citizen exercising their rights. What that seems to mean is that your wife needs to be living in France either to work, to study or as an "inactive" (basically means that she is retired). The prefecture normally wants to see proof of residence (a rental contract or something similar) and evidence that the EU national has some means of maintaining the family while in France (pension, for example), though there isn't a strict minimum like there is for a visa application.

The details (in French) are here: Citoyens européens en France - Service-public.fr under the heading Vivre avec sa famille européenne ou non européenne en France.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Bev
Really appreciate that. I've googled the subject, and contacted the local Brisbane French Consulate (not very helpful), and am still confused as to whether I need to obtain a 'visa long séjour' prior to leaving Australia.

Thanks
Terry
 

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It kind of depends why and how you and your wife are going to France. If she is going to exercise her EU rights (i.e. to study, work or retire) there, then you don't need a long-stay visa and you can simply apply for your carte de séjour after your wife is settled in and has the paperwork to show that.

If you're going to work or study, or you're going with plans to live off your savings, then you may need a long-stay visa. Unfortunately, it ultimately depends on how difficult the local prefecture wants to be about the specifics of the requirements.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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It kind of depends why and how you and your wife are going to France. If she is going to exercise her EU rights (i.e. to study, work or retire) there, then you don't need a long-stay visa and you can simply apply for your carte de séjour after your wife is settled in and has the paperwork to show that.

If you're going to work or study, or you're going with plans to live off your savings, then you may need a long-stay visa. Unfortunately, it ultimately depends on how difficult the local prefecture wants to be about the specifics of the requirements.
Cheers,
Bev
As the legal spouse of a EU-citizen, if that citizen exercises her treaty rights (employed, even part-time, self-employed or intending to be, study at a school, retired, living on savings, looking for a job), you will not need a visa de long sejour. Within two months of arrival you need to go to the local prefecture to apply for your carte de sejour membre de la famille d'un citoyen UE. Normally you need your passport, your spouse's passport, proof of income, or registration with the authorities as a self-employed person, or other attestation/financial documents as to receiving a pension or having independent funds, registration with pole d'emploi as a job-seeker, proof of health-insurance and residence. This should get you a 5 year carte de sejour. Good luck. You can only be in the public health system if you either are employed, self employed or are registered as a self-employed person (auto-entrepreneur, for instance)
 
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