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Hey,

I'm an expat with UK citizenship, and after getting an NIE I'm fine to live and work here. I have a friend however who also wants to live here but she is from Tunisia. Visa wise she can stay for 90 days, leave for 90, stay for 90 etc. She mentioned that after getting an NIE she could stay for a year, but I am not surre if that is accurate or not.
Also, how can I go about getting her to stay here permanently, are there ways for non-EU citizeens to get citizenship here?

Thanks a lot
:)
Hi all
 

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Hey,

I'm an expat with UK citizenship, and after getting an NIE I'm fine to live and work here. I have a friend however who also wants to live here but she is from Tunisia. Visa wise she can stay for 90 days, leave for 90, stay for 90 etc. She mentioned that after getting an NIE she could stay for a year, but I am not surre if that is accurate or not.
Also, how can I go about getting her to stay here permanently, are there ways for non-EU citizeens to get citizenship here?

Thanks a lot
:)
Hi all
Welcome to the forum. An NIE is purely a fiscal identification number, and it does not confer any rights on anybody, whether an EU citizen or not, to remain in the country.

Non-EU citizens need a visa to remain in the country for longer than 90 days, whereas EU citizens need to register as residents if they intend to stay for longer than 90 days.

In order to apply for citizenship (with the exception of some Latin American countries where the qualifying period is shorter) one has to have been legally resident in Spain for at least 10 years, be able to demonstrate (by way of an exammination certificate) that one can speak a basic level of Spanish (A2) and pass an examination about Spanish history and culture.
 

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Welcome to the forum. An NIE is purely a fiscal identification number, and it does not confer any rights on anybody, whether an EU citizen or not, to remain in the country.

Non-EU citizens need a visa to remain in the country for longer than 90 days, whereas EU citizens need to register as residents if they intend to stay for longer than 90 days.

In order to apply for citizenship (with the exception of some Latin American countries where the qualifying period is shorter) one has to have been legally resident in Spain for at least 10 years, be able to demonstrate (by way of an exammination certificate) that one can speak a basic level of Spanish (A2) and pass an examination about Spanish history and culture.
Might be worth mentioning that Non-EU citizens of countries signed up to Schengen are treated like EU citizens in respect of visa requirements.
 

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I'm a Non-EU citizen (Swiss) and don't need a visa to stay in excess of 90 days but its probably not relevant to this thread. Maybe it should read Non-European.
Doesn't Switzerland have a special agreement? Certainly my daughter didn't need a visa to live in Switzerland for a year, as an EU citizen.


I'm pretty sure that doesn't apply to a US citizen, for example. Right of residency in one EU country, for a non-EU citizen, doesn't mean automatic right of residency in another.
 

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Doesn't Switzerland have a special agreement? Certainly my daughter didn't need a visa to live in Switzerland for a year, as an EU citizen.


I'm pretty sure that doesn't apply to a US citizen, for example. Right of residency in one EU country, for a non-EU citizen, doesn't mean automatic right of residency in another.
This is actually a good example of how people misunderstand rights etc - Switzerland is part of the EEA (European Economic Area). Here's an explanation of the Swiss relationship with the EU https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switzerland%E2%80%93European_Union_relations - note that it has not been plain sailing in respect of eg. cross-border workers (a relatively recent issue that has since been resolved).

TBH, EU/EFTA/EEA/non-EU etc arrangements are not so easy to understand and it's human nature to assume the status quo (i.e. for this thread how things work for citizens of your home country) when you don't know what questions to ask.
 
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