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Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone!

I have a bit of a complicated question. (sorry if this is best in Europe forums, admins feel free to move :) )

Short version - I'm an Australian with a dual passport, my wife and step-son are Colombian citizens in Colombia.

I've read around that I'd be able to get into most countries in Europe under my British passport and then my family could migrate with me.

Just wanting a bit of clarification on this one?

Do we need any visas?
My step-son is Autistic, would this be a problem for any migration? (health requirements etc etc)
Is there any time constraints on the visas? (for both my family and myself, living in Europe as a British passport holder)

Thanks in advance!
Aaron E.
 

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Colombians generally need visit visas for most European countries. As family members of EU (UK) citizen, there may be alternative travel document they can get, or visa process is simplified and issued free.
Specifically, if you want to live and work in another EEA country (other than UK), they have rights under EU law to accompany you. They still generally need a short-term visa to enter, but then they can apply for residence card as your family members, which will be valid 5 years and allow them to work. After 5 years, they can get permanent residence.
If you want to move to UK, the procedure will be different. You can't generally bring them under EU rules but have to conform to UK immigration rules. It means getting settlement visas for them, for which you need to meet financial requirement, meaning you need to be in work or have a UK job offer paying at least £22,400 gross. There is a way to bypass this, called Surinder Singh, which requires family relocation to another EEA country first, working or running a business.
Your stepson's medical condition should not affect his eligibility under EU rules or UK immigration law, and you don't even need to disclose his medical history. Of course, eligibility for medical and other care once you move to Europe will be another matter, and you need to investigate, as it varies among countries. UK now requires a payment of £200 a year per non-EEA family member (including children) called Immigration Health Surcharge (IHS) to access NHS.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks Joppa!

Yeah I thought British migration might be a bit more convoluted in terms of residency. Our ultimate goal is Australian Residency, but it's a long and convoluted and I won't bore you with those details! haha

So just to summarize for European immigration, they'd need to apply for a tourist visa to enter, then once they're in, we'd apply for EU Residency as family members?

Do you happen to know if there would be any period where I would be required to settle in said EU country first? or is that a better question for the Europe Forum?

Thank you once again!
 

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Yes, that's generally the procedure. If you go to the relevant EEA country's embassy site, there should be an explanation of rules as they relate to that particular country. Clearly it will be more of a hassle if you don't speak the local language or are unfamiliar with its red tape. So easy in Ireland, Malta, Cyprus, Scandinavian countries (excellent English spoken), but less so in France, Spain, Italy, Germany etc.
No, you can just enter any EEA country together. But to get residence cards, you should be in work (you have 3 months to find a job) or otherwise exercising treaty rights.
If you have specific query about an EEA country, post it on national forum if it exists.
 
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