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Don't know if this has been discussed before but when I was buying my baguette yesterday I thought that it might be useful for newcomers to know that there are two kinds of boulangerie in France.

Only bakers who make their bread themselves are allowed to call their outlets "BOULANGERIE" so as to differentiate them from shops that sell bread produced elsewhere, often on an industrial scale.

So if the word BOULANGERIE is not visible, the bread that you are buying has most probably been produced elsewhere. There are quite a few bakery "chains" and the bread and other items they sell may be equivalent in quality to local boulangerie produced bread, but it's not always the case.

This rule protects the traditional boulangers - the choice is yours though. :becky:
 

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There's also the "DEPOT DE PAIN" which is a shop (usually food shop) that sells bread from a boulangerie some way distant. Often found in small villages.

DejW
 

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I buy my baguettes from two places - I call one the House of Freaking Deliciousness (where I know the time the baguettes are still warm and the locals don't live near there) and a place of low ceiling dark breadiness a little further away that I can't go into until a certain time of day as those damn locals are filling up all the space;) Once I bought a baguette from the supermarket and was smote by a sword of wrath immediately.
 

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There are good boulangeries and not so good ones. I like the baker opposite and they are open very long hours, which really suits me, but I just spent a week at my cousin's place in Vitrolles and the second closes baker to her home (about 500 m away) makes the best bread I've ever tasted.

There is another difference between boulangeries and that is whether or not it is artisanal. In my experience the boulangers artisanals are the best.

Long live our French boulangers :)
 

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As a way of amusing myself (as one must do), I'm going to try baguettes from the top five places in the recent baguette award (how the F did I miss the Paris Bread Festival!) - at least the ones with accessible shops. Out of the running of my own awards currently is the 1st place getter whose shop has a step.
 

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As a way of amusing myself (as one must do), I'm going to try baguettes from the top five places in the recent baguette award (how the F did I miss the Paris Bread Festival!) - at least the ones with accessible shops. Out of the running of my own awards currently is the 1st place getter whose shop has a step.
/the bakery I regularly use has a ramp. Pau actually does half well in terms of accessibility - they have adjusted the kerbs at all of the bus stops so that people with difficulties or in wheelchairs can get on and off without a step. Interestingly the other day we took the bus from Vitrolles to Marseille and we all commented on how high the step onto and off the bus was and how it was absolutely unacceptable. Heck, even a fit and healthy young person with an injury would have been hard pressed to get on or off, and it would be totally impossible for someone in a wheelchair. I take my (notional) hat off to you for coping so well. :yo:

It had occurred to me a little while ago that you could have easily prepared a project that would have allowed you to come on a talents et competences visa.
 

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It had occurred to me a little while ago that you could have easily prepared a project that would have allowed you to come on a talents et competences visa.
Well actually I did come to Paris specifically as a continuation of my blog although the focus has changed somewhat and it's mostly just about me now. Me and my silly, crazy, challenging life:) I had intended to promote Paris' accessibility and encourage ramps etc but as it turns out, it's very accessible as I suspected (apart from accommodation). Accessibility is in the eye of the beholder - I see access whereas others see steps eg the top baguette bakery doesn't have access but the next three appear to have flat or ramped access. So they get my money!

I do research accessible hotels etc and that info has already provided great relief for a person with a similar disability. I will investigate the visa you spoke of though as it might or might not be useful. I was so overwhelmed when organising for this year that it has not been until this month that I stopped feeling like a tourist. Today I've been suffering the 'Why am I here!!!' feelings so a baguette hunt should bolster up my mood:)
 

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I will investigate the visa you spoke of though as it might or might not be useful.
However I don't believe you can change your visa from within France, so you would either have to return to Australia or be resident in another country to make the application :(
 

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'you can take the boy out of Sarf London, but you can't take Sarf London outta the boy'
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Lord. The thought of a 23 hour flight to Australia makes my hair curl.
I think making your own hair curl means you have to register as AE.......unless you did not actually purchase the airline ticket, in which case you have not technically paid for your hairdo.
 

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Just to get back to the topic of this thread, you'll often see a "pain depot" in small towns (like, those with only a single boulangerie) during the summer or school holidays. There are mobile boulangeries that drive a route from town to town during the holidays - either selling direct to customers while the local baker is shut down, or depositing bread and possibly a few "staple" items (croissants, for example) in one of the local shops in the interim.

Not usually necessary in towns with more than one boulangerie, as the shops do tend to coordinate their holiday plans.
Cheers,
Bev
 
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