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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I own a pedicab business in the U.S. and I would like to bring them to Mexico. I envison a place like Cabo where the tourist trade is heavy. Ideally, these bicycle taxis can take tourists from a cruise ship to the main shopping areas of the their destination. I could see this working in Cabo, but I have not visited many other areas of Mexico.

Being close to the US/Mexican border is a plus for ease of transport, but I can probably drive further for the ideal location. A cruise ship destination is not necessary as these bikes are popular anywhere where the pedestrian tourist trade is heavy. I have no intention of competing with locals, but rather using residents as independent contractors.

Any thoughts or suggestioins are greatly welcomed. I know next to nothing about living or working in Mexico. Just a dream trying to become reality.

Wayne
 

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1. You would have to have INM permission to work in Mexico.
2. You would have to have a license to import the trikes.
3. You would have to have business licenses, an accountant, tax registration, etc.
4. You might have to survive the wrath of the local 'sindicatos'. Are you prepared to leave at midnight????? That happened to a friend. He survived, the business didn't.

Besides, who wants Mexico to look like China?
 

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Even in Waikiki where I was a pedi-taxista for a few months they didn't have enough to handle a cruise ship. They were eventually baned for being a street hazard. Mexico does not mind street hazards but competition with the local transport will be frowned upon.

Instead of the horse drawn carriages so popular in the US .... maybe an Oxcart?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for your replies. I will take them to heart.

As far as Mexico looking like China, you should probably ask the Mexican pedicab operators in Cabo San Lucas. They seem to be thriving.

Concerning pedicabs in Waikiki, Honolulu Pedicabs is operating now and quite successful. Horse drawn carriages may be popular in the US, but not compared to pedicabs. There are over 1000 pedicabs registered in Manhattan. Doubt you'll see that many horses walking around Manhattan.

Having enough pedicabs to service a cruise ship is not the point. I have five pedicabs to work a college football game in my town and there are 80,000 people in attendance. Certainly not enough to service everyone, but we are considered a valuable service to the university.

All that being said, I understand that what works in the US may not work in Mexico, which is why I asked you experts.

Thanks again!
 

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Pedi-cab

I just returned from Tapachula, Chiapas. They have lots of pedicabs there already. It is not a tourist town. Most people buy bikes or small motorcycles and modify them to 3 wheeled cabs. It is a very good business. The locals use them all the time as a cheaper alternative to taxis.:ranger:
 

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Concerning pedicabs in Waikiki, Honolulu Pedicabs is operating now and quite successful.
Of topic I know but there was no lineup at the International Market a few years ago like when I worked. International Market was the main and almost only Pedi Stand. Assumed they were gone and read a few articles about the issues they were having
 

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If my city, where the weather is not nice AT ALL, usually 7 months a year, can support a pedi-cab business, it appears to be a growing idea.

There's a young man who is paying for his college education, hiring drivers for his pedi-cabs in downtown Mpls.

Doing very well, if you can imagine.

In a warmer spot, I imagine it would do very well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The pedicabbers in Denver go 24/7 365 days a year. They are hardcore.

San Diego has 400 pedicabs registered. I would guess they aren't making minimum wage...by a long shot. :)

Again, it isn't my intention to upset the locals, just to bring some nice bikes down for the tourists and use the locals to operate the business. Unfortunately, I don't speak the language (but intend to learn) and according to RVGringo would run substantial risk for my hide.
 

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I, too, have a "revolutionary idea" for the advertising industry in the resort areas, but knowing what I don't know about Mexico, unless I can network with a Mexican citizen who knows the ropes, it will remain just an idea.

I am learning that we in the USA (and Canada) really do live in a land of opportunity, where anyone with the resources can make a go of it, and that does not seem to be true of Mexico so much.

Now I am sure there are very successful entrepreneurs there - but I get the idea that it is easier to make your idea a reality north of the border.
 

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I think the "who wants MX to look like China" comment is extremely silly and ignorant. Forgetting the fact that I for one (and there are many others) would love to see MX and every country look like "China", you apparently have no idea what China looks like these days. Your image of bikes all over the place (a beautiful thought by itself) is outdated. Thanks to Hollywood and the desire to be wealthy, the bike has been pushed out of the picture and replaced by the China dream - the 4-wheeled motorized vehicle. So in the future, please rephrase your sentence to read, "who wants MX to look like the Netherlands?".
 

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Leaving bicycles yes or no argument aside, I have just learned that anyone with a real good idea, if they can avoid the government and/or organized crime interference here in Mexico, can do what we used to be able to do in the US (don't know about Canada): use the entrepreneurial spirit, that of the common person, to try and "make it".

Yesterday was Palm Sunday. We were in Ajijic. Everywhere I looked I saw this small entrepreneurial ideal: little kids selling beautiful religious icons, men and women at tables selling everything from cerzesa (my weakness here) to t-shirts. It seems to still be a place for the little guy - some of the best eating we have found was not in any of the chain places we in the US have been inundated with, but in small "Mom and Pop" restaurants, where good food and excellent service make them successful, not the name on the sign. Some of the best bakery goods, even the day-to-day shopping necessities are sold out of "corner stores" on side streets, and not found at Wal-Mart or even Soriana.

Good news, I think, for our bicycle pioneer - find the right location and you can go for it here, the little person can make it.
 

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Hi,

I own a pedicab business in the U.S. and I would like to bring them to Mexico. I envison a place like Cabo where the tourist trade is heavy. Ideally, these bicycle taxis can take tourists from a cruise ship to the main shopping areas of the their destination. I could see this working in Cabo, but I have not visited many other areas of Mexico.

Being close to the US/Mexican border is a plus for ease of transport, but I can probably drive further for the ideal location. A cruise ship destination is not necessary as these bikes are popular anywhere where the pedestrian tourist trade is heavy. I have no intention of competing with locals, but rather using residents as independent contractors.

Any thoughts or suggestioins are greatly welcomed. I know next to nothing about living or working in Mexico. Just a dream trying to become reality.

Wayne
Hi-The other reply was dead on. In Quintana Roo, and assume all MEX the same, the syndicates-Taxistas- are a powerful organization that are very selective and powerful. Have never seen a ****** in this capacity, and the drivers we know always seem to be connected by family--cousins, brothers, etc. They hold onto this one pretty tight. Maybe another profession?
 

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agreed with the original reply. bici taxis are everywhere in my small town, and they seem to do great. im sure they run at least 25 or so daily. as was said though, no way can you just bring a taxi service down here. sorry. you cant even sell peanuts in the park without getn bumped off the corner by the old man who was already selling.
 

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agreed with the original reply. bici taxis are everywhere in my small town, and they seem to do great. im sure they run at least 25 or so daily. as was said though, no way can you just bring a taxi service down here. sorry. you cant even sell peanuts in the park without getn bumped off the corner by the old man who was already selling.
And rightly so.

The old man is probably feeding his family, selling those peanuts, while you are hoping to have a Grand Adventure.
 
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