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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking around at the insanity that is my home country, I have come to the painful conclusion that the United States is not a good place to raise my two sons, nor will it be a good place for my future grandchildren and great grandchildren, etc. I think becoming an expat might be the best thing for my family, present and future.

About Me: I've lived in Vermont my whole life and the prospect of leaving is particularly painful because my family's New England roots run very deep. We have lived in Vermont for generations and our history in this country has never strayed far from the Northeast Kingdom. Some of my (English) ancestors came aboard the Mayflower and some (French) came down from Quebec.

As beautiful as pictures of British Columbia and Alberta are (are these provinces as gorgeous in person?) it is unlikely that my heartstrings will allow me to move farther than QC, NB, NS, or maybe PE. What are the best towns for raising a family? I would like to avoid large cities for something more rural.

Also, I'm working on becoming a sex educator, a career path difficult to follow in the U.S. Are attitudes about human sexuality and health less uptight in Canada?
 

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When you say sex educator, what are you talking about? If you mean teaching sex ed in schools, you cannot teach without a teaching degree and we already have a glut of teachers here.

And don't forget about Ontario. We might not be as far east as you are used to, but we aren't that far away.

With regards to Quebec - can you speak French?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm working on learning French now. I sponsor a little girl in Burkina Faso and I want to be able to read the historical records of my family that immigrated from Quebec and hopefully trace that branch even farther back to France.

As far as being a sex educator, yes I do mean teaching (preferably pre-teens and adolescents, but willing to lead workshops for adults as well). I would be willing to teach this subject within a broader scope of health science (including nutrition and other teen issues) but my country is so skittish about this subject and in many places (especially the south/Bible Belt) won't allow young people to learn it at all, sometimes even lying to kids about sexuality and sexual health and grossly exaggerating the consequences of sex.
 

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You need to define what you mean by 'teach'. Do you mean working as a teacher in schools? If so, you cannot do that without a teaching degree. If you mean doing workshops, etc. then you won't need a teaching degree but I don't think we really do those as sexuality is covered by teachers (at various grade levels) in the normal curriculum.

With regards to French, learning some French and learning enough to survive in Quebec are two different things. Unless you are fluent, or have at least enough or a working knowledge of French to get by in day to day life, then I think you should look at provinces other than Quebec.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm good with language and am confident in my ability to learn French well (of course, the best way to learn another language is through immersion). I mentioned QC as a likely province for settling is because it is directly over my head; literally a matter of a few hours away.

Yes, by "teach" I ideally mean within a school system, but it's not something I would limit myself to. Of course, having read through other threads on this forum, I have learned that Canada is pretty well set with educators (I shouldn't be disappointed; I know it's the right thing). It appears that this is a career path best suited for living in the states.

I've also considered pursuing certification as a doula (pregnancy, prenatal care, birth, postpartum, and brain development in infancy through early childhood being other interests of mine).
 

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I'm good with language and am confident in my ability to learn French well (of course, the best way to learn another language is through immersion).
Just don't be overconfident about your ability to learn French. Many Canadians are nowhere near fluent enough to live in Quebec despite taking French all through school (grade school and high school).



Yes, by "teach" I ideally mean within a school system, but it's not something I would limit myself to.
OK, if you are looking at the school system you cannot teach without a teaching degree and sex ed is not a teachable subject for teacher's college.



Of course, having read through other threads on this forum, I have learned that Canada is pretty well set with educators (I shouldn't be disappointed; I know it's the right thing). It appears that this is a career path best suited for living in the states.
Yes, we have a glut of teachers with more graduating each year.


I've also considered pursuing certification as a doula (pregnancy, prenatal care, birth, postpartum, and brain development in infancy through early childhood being other interests of mine).

I have no idea what a doula is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have no idea what a doula is.
A doula (or birth companion) is a non-medical person who assists and supports expecting parents by providing physical assistance, emotional support, and information regarding pregnancy, birth, and postpartum. Doulas often partner with midwives. It is common for them to offer additional services like photography or belly casting. Some doulas have special training to work as “bereavement doulas” which lend support to families experiencing pregnancy loss.
 

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A doula (or birth companion) is a non-medical person who assists and supports expecting parents by providing physical assistance, emotional support, and information regarding pregnancy, birth, and postpartum. Doulas often partner with midwives. It is common for them to offer additional services like photography or belly casting. Some doulas have special training to work as “bereavement doulas” which lend support to families experiencing pregnancy loss.


I've never heard of those so I don't think they are a big thing here. I could be wrong, but you'd think I would have at least have heard the term if they were used here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Colchar, I don't suppose you have an answer to my original question and the main point to this thread? Are you raising a family in Canada? I know everyone has an opinion, but have there been studies or reports as to the best places for parents raising children? Quality education, low crime rates, clean environment & healthy people, age appropriate spaces & activities available (parks, playgrounds, museums, etc).
 

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Colchar, I don't suppose you have an answer to my original question and the main point to this thread?

Doesn't it make sense to figure out if you qualify to emigrate to Canada and have reasonable employment prospects before worrying about where you might live?

Thus far you have proposed a career in Canada that doesn't fit with how things are done here. Sex ed is taught by qualified teachers as part of the general curriculum and you cannot teach in Canada without a teaching degree.

Second, you seem to overestimate your ability to learn French especially since Quebecois French is not the kind of French you are likely to learn in the US. Quebecois French is not the same as the French spoken in France. It isn't even a different dialect, it is almost a different language.

Third, you propose another possible career that isn't common and, when it is done, it is done by qualified midwives and doesn't seem to be a separate career path in and of itself.

Your expectations of what you will be able to do here don't really fit with the realities of everyday life in Canada.

Personally, I would want to know that before I went to the time and expense of trying to emigrate. If you have other qualifications (a degree, etc.) then it might make more sense to try to use that as a ticket to immigration than the ideas that you have proposed thus far. Use those other qualifications to come to Canada and then you can try to move into one of the other positions you mentioned.



Are you raising a family in Canada?

I have, but what does that have to do with anything? My experiences would matter only for the area in which I lived and wouldn't translate to other areas of the country.



I know everyone has an opinion, but have there been studies or reports as to the best places for parents raising children?

Yes, but many of those will be entirely subjective.


Quality education, low crime rates, clean environment & healthy people, age appropriate spaces & activities available (parks, playgrounds, museums, etc).

For issues like crime rates, etc. Statistics Canada would be the first place to start.
 

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@WingWeaver I know what a doula is. And they are actually very popular all over Canada. I used to be part of a family forum and a very big part of the women used doulas. Some places I know for sure used them are:
Ottawa, Toronto (Ontario)
Alberta
BC
A bit in Montreal (where there is a big anglophone community).

I think becoming a doula is a better idea than the educator.. As previous posters have mentioned there are tonnes already.

As for places to live there are a lot of smaller communities around Ottawa you can look at. Even on the Quebec side there are entire towns that speak mainly English surprisingly (I was born and raised in one of them).
 

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I don't really understand what you mean by sex educator. In school that was just taught to us by our gym or home room teacher lol

If you mean sexual health and STI education that is generally led by registered nurses... in sexual health clinics that are funded by the government
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Doesn't it make sense to figure out if you qualify to emigrate to Canada and have reasonable employment prospects before worrying about where you might live?.
I won't be in a position to move out of the country for a few years. This is not something I am actively pursuing right now; merely something I am gathering information for and planning on for the future. I am learning about all the things that I will need to know and consider, not just from other threads in this forum, but other sources as well. However, having some idea of WHERE in Canada I would like to settle into (apply for jobs, looking into the cost of rent / housing market, daycare costs, quality schools) is something that I may be able to figure out sooner rather than later.

Second, you seem to overestimate your ability to learn French.
I'm sorry, but you know absolutely nothing about my ability to learn a language.

Third, you propose another possible career that isn't common and, when it is done, it is done by qualified midwives and doesn't seem to be a separate career path in and of itself.
Wrong. Doulas are a valid and very real career path; they practice their profession all over the world.

Your expectations of what you will be able to do here don't really fit with the realities of everyday life in Canada.
I've seen some of other things you have posted in reply to other people and I have to say, you come off as being rather rude.

I have, but what does that have to do with anything? My experiences would matter only for the area in which I lived and wouldn't translate to other areas of the country.
This was literally what I was asking for. I wanted feedback from people raising families and their personal experiences on being an expat family in their particular region.


For issues like crime rates, etc. Statistics Canada would be the first place to start.
See? Now this was actually helpful. This is a resource I can go look into. In the future, can you please stop being so judgmental? You don't have the right to tell me what my abilities are or assume that you know what my expectations are for anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I know what a doula is. And they are actually very popular all over Canada. I used to be part of a family forum and a very big part of the women used doulas. Some places I know for sure used them are:
Ottawa, Toronto (Ontario)
Alberta
BC
A bit in Montreal (where there is a big anglophone community).
Thank you! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I don't really understand what you mean by sex educator.
Okay, so the U.S. is pretty messed up when it comes to this subject. Only 24 states require public schools to teach sex education. This subject includes physical changes during puberty, how pregnancy occurs, STI's (symptoms and how they spread/risks), and the importance of contraception. Most schools have an official policy to encourage students to remain abstinent. Less than half of the country (20 states) require that the sex education students receive must be medically accurate. Which means that it is permissible in 30 states to make false implications, edit information to fit a conservative or religious narrative, and exaggerate the consequences of being sexually active. 35 states allow parents to opt-out on behalf of their children. Private schools can teach anything they want on this subject. It's not uncommon for teenage girls in the Bible Belt to become pregnant and not know how it happened, because they "learned" from other kids in school that you can't get pregnant if you have sex while on your period or if it's your first time. Non-hetero sex is never mentioned, leaving gay kids out in the cold. So much focus is given to when kids are old enough to have sex (after you graduate high school or after you get married) that the topic of consent and dismantling rape culture is often glossed over.
 

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Okay, so the U.S. is pretty messed up when it comes to this subject. Only 24 states require public schools to teach sex education. This subject includes physical changes during puberty, how pregnancy occurs, STI's (symptoms and how they spread/risks), and the importance of contraception. Most schools have an official policy to encourage students to remain abstinent. Less than half of the country (20 states) require that the sex education students receive must be medically accurate. Which means that it is permissible in 30 states to make false implications, edit information to fit a conservative or religious narrative, and exaggerate the consequences of being sexually active. 35 states allow parents to opt-out on behalf of their children. Private schools can teach anything they want on this subject. It's not uncommon for teenage girls in the Bible Belt to become pregnant and not know how it happened, because they "learned" from other kids in school that you can't get pregnant if you have sex while on your period or if it's your first time. Non-hetero sex is never mentioned, leaving gay kids out in the cold. So much focus is given to when kids are old enough to have sex (after you graduate high school or after you get married) that the topic of consent and dismantling rape culture is often glossed over.
I used to live in PA for a while and found it frightening (and at times hilarious) what kinds of questions my friends came to me with. Apparently, being German (where there are 'nude' beaches) made me some sort of expert. The mind boggles.

On another note, as far as I know, US citizens currently need permanent residence to stay in Canada for more than 180 days - somebody correct me please if that's not the case.

So the question would be, does being a doula make you eligible for immigration?

Of course, nobody knows what the rules and sought-after skills will be in several years' time.
 
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