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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Surely some of you are into photography. If so, what kind of camera do you feel comfortable with as a walk-around?

I normally shoot with the Canon 5D SLR with detachable "L" lenses, but that's way too much hardware to be flashing around in Mexico. It draws attention of the wrong kind.

It seemed that the Canon PowerShot S110 was good choice for me because it comes with a manual adjustment ring around the lens allowing you to take control of the camera, quickly changing focus, F-stops, shutter speed, and ISO making it easy to handle difficult lighting conditions. I think anyone who's mastered anything from a Digital Rebel on up to the top of the Canon line might welcome this feature. The Auto Mode works just fine as well if you don't want to deal with those issues and still get some great shots without the worry.

Best of all, like all the compact point-and-shoots, it slips right into a shirt or jeans pocket and stays out of sight until I need it again.

We'll see how it works out. It's charging now.

But I was wondering what cameras other photographers had picked for Mexico and why, and about how much thought you give to what kind of equipment you're toting around from a security standpoint.
 

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I have always used DSLR's and my little camera was a Canon s90 then Canon s100. Last year I got a Sony RX100 and then a couple months back the newer Sony RX100-2 and I can tell you that there is NOTHING else out there that comes close to either of them for the size!! Try one and you may find your 5D permanently in the closet, it is THAT good.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
I use a Casio zr20, very handy
And other times, Canon G9
I think I just fell in love with that G9.

You know, I started with point-and-shoot and then went SLR about year later. I cannot believe the advancements that have been made int he point-and-shoot department. Sure, I knew, because I could see some great shots on SmugMug and other photo sites. But the advancements have been really amazing once you've played with one.

I'll keep the 5D and the L lenses, because when there is time to really set up a shot, I love having exactly the right lens for the job. I even invested in the Canon L series lenses which do seem to be cut above the others in terms of sharpness and color richness. But the SLR has a huge disadvantage when you have to change lenses in the field in that the sensor is exposed for a few seconds. A speck of dust can leave you with an expensive camera that puts dirty spots on the pictures at narrow F stops. The 5D has a couple of specks despite blowing it out after use and annual cleanings.

After seeing the images this PowerShot gets, in Auto Mode, by the way, I don't think the 5D is coming out of the case unless it's something really specialized that I need to do. It will never be my walk-around camera again.

Maybe I should sell one of those expensive L series lenses and upgrade to a G9... (I guess I'm just a Canon guy.)

One thing I loved about the the G9 is that it still has an optical viewfinder. Do you see any info about settings or a light meter in the viewfinder?

Most of the compacts now don't seem to have an optical viewfinder at all, including this S110. That's going to take some getting used to.

I'm sure you've gotten some awesome photos with it.
 

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I think I just fell in love with that G9. You know, I started with point-and-shoot and then went SLR about year later. I cannot believe the advancements that have been made int he point-and-shoot department. Sure, I knew, because I could see some great shots on SmugMug and other photo sites. But the advancements have been really amazing once you've played with one. I'll keep the 5D and the L lenses, because when there is time to really set up a shot, I love having exactly the right lens for the job. I even invested in the Canon L series lenses which do seem to be cut above the others in terms of sharpness and color richness. But the SLR has a huge disadvantage when you have to change lenses in the field in that the sensor is exposed for a few seconds. A speck of dust can leave you with an expensive camera that puts dirty spots on the pictures at narrow F stops. The 5D has a couple of specks despite blowing it out after use and annual cleanings. After seeing the images this PowerShot gets, in Auto Mode, by the way, I don't think the 5D is coming out of the case unless it's something really specialized that I need to do. It will never be my walk-around camera again. Maybe I should sell one of those expensive L series lenses and upgrade to a G9... (I guess I'm just a Canon guy.) One thing I loved about the the G9 is that it still has an optical viewfinder. Do you see any info about settings or a light meter in the viewfinder? Most of the compacts now don't seem to have an optical viewfinder at all, including this S110. That's going to take some getting used to. I'm sure you've gotten some awesome photos with it.
I love G9 , it takes great pictures, tried G10, didn't like it
Since you know much more about cameras than me, take a look at the specs on my casio and tell me what you think, I'm still learning how to use it, so far so good, and...it's very very very handy
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I love G9 , it takes great pictures, tried G10, didn't like it
Since you know much more about cameras than me, take a look at the specs on my casio and tell me what you think, I'm still learning how to use it, so far so good, and...it's very very very handy
Ok, I'll do that later today.
 

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Check out the Panasonic Lumix FV200 with the Leica lens. My husband the photographer has had 'em all, big and small and is nuts about this one. I think he said it was the "camera of the year" and there's lots of consumer feedback on the net.

The best kind of camera is one that's inconspicuous, for any number of reasons, si?
 

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Coincidentally, I just bought a point-and-shoot, too. I was looking for low cost (under 2000 pesos) with acceptable performance given the price, and I got the Canon PowerShot A2600 on sale at Costco for about 1400 (maybe it was 1499). I am really impressed—as El Paso mentioned above—with the advances, though we are talking about a different level of camera.

In the case of the A2600, the automatic setting now analyzes the scene and (if you want to allow it it) chooses the mode for you (close-up, snow, scenery, backlit, fast motion, low light, portrait, etc.) Or you can choose one of those modes manually. Or you can choose settings manually.

About the only feature that could be better is the design of the buttons on the right side — there is no blank space to put your right thumb while shooting and I end up taking a lot of accidental videos.
 

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Check out the Panasonic Lumix FV200 with the Leica lens. My husband the photographer has had 'em all, big and small and is nuts about this one. I think he said it was the "camera of the year" and there's lots of consumer feedback on the net. The best kind of camera is one that's inconspicuous, for any number of reasons, si?
I can't find it on the net
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I love G9 , it takes great pictures, tried G10, didn't like it
Since you know much more about cameras than me, take a look at the specs on my casio and tell me what you think, I'm still learning how to use it, so far so good, and...it's very very very handy
The Casio gets a good review here in terms of dollar value.

The reviewer really praises this model for being extremely fast. For someone looking for a point-and-shoot to capture a fast moving event like a soccer game or a race of some kind it might be a great choice in the under $200 category. The reviewer complained a bit about the zoom being "too fast", but that can be a good thing sometimes. And you get used to it. Better fast than slow if you know something is about to disappear from view.

It also said this Casio can take video and stills at the same time. I had to think about that feature a minute, but it would be handy if you want both it being a bit of a hassle to get a still out of video without video editing software.

Some say having 16 megapixels is a bit overrated, but when you need to blow up a detail into its own stand alone image the more the better.

I'm really not much of an expert on the best cameras inasmuch as I just get what I can afford and concentrate on mastering it, mostly for landscapes. That's why I thought this thread might be interesting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Check out the Panasonic Lumix FV200 with the Leica lens. My husband the photographer has had 'em all, big and small and is nuts about this one. I think he said it was the "camera of the year" and there's lots of consumer feedback on the net.

The best kind of camera is one that's inconspicuous, for any number of reasons, si?
Absolutely. When I first got the 5D I first pulled it out in the plaza in front of the cathedral in Juarez to get some shots of the Mission de Guadalupe that dates back to the 16th century. I was glad I bought it because it's perfect for the low light conditions inside.

But outside it was pretty clear that it was big mistake to take a full frame camera into the crowd. Just too many people were looking over at me. I don't think anyone in that particular crowd had any mischief in mind, but I don't think I want to get confused for a photo journalist while moving around crowds in any foreign country --- not without a team with me. And, in fact, it can get you into hot water some places in the US.

Not to mention the risk of losing the camera to some bad guys looking for something expensive that they call sell quickly.

So, yeah, slipping the camera out of sight when not in use is a great idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Gary I've been thinking about ways to explore the quickness of the Casio discussed in the review.

But, first, do you like striving for great shots, or just need the camera more or less to document family gatherings, places you visit, things you want to remember? Nothing wrong with that at all, and you get some great surprises in terms of great shots considering the quality of today's point-and-shoots.

So disregard the rest if it's of no interest to you.

In nutshell, I would find some kind of moving event that was in my control, like water rushing from a faucet, a cat or dog taking a familiar path across your living room, a toddler you know is always going to do something interesting...I'm sure you get the idea.

Then find out how to take control over those "fast features" (if you even have to do anything at all beyond selecting a shooting mode), put the camera on a tripod or set it on a flat surface, get the moving event properly framed, and give it a go using the rapid sequence feature, where the camera just clicks away a number of times as fast as it can. The idea is to make sure the camera doesn't budge even a millimeter if you manage it, and that the object of the photo is sure to stay in the frame -- something impossible to do at a sporting event or car race.

It might be really surprising all the gold nuggets that would pop out of the Casio in terms of being really striking photos, because it sounds like it's a big strength with that model.
 

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--- not without a team with me. And, in fact, it can get you into hot water some places in the US.
Should be no hot water in the U.S. according to the First Amendment to the Constitution. Almost everyone can take a picture of anything or anyone on public property without asking for permission but not in cases where the image will be used commercially.
 

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I'm gonna buy one of those pocket cameras because Mexico eats all the other ones I've had. Dust and moisture just seems to be too much for them. I never pay over $500 but still too much with the current record. Friend bought a $1000+ something with detachable lenses and it lasted 4 months .... humidity on the coast?

Cheap or one of those underwater ones encased in a plastic box
 

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Gary I've been thinking about ways to explore the quickness of the Casio discussed in the review.

But, first, do you like striving for great shots, or just need the camera more or less to document family gatherings, places you visit, things you want to remember? Nothing wrong with that at all, and you get some great surprises in terms of great shots considering the quality of today's point-and-shoots.

So disregard the rest if it's of no interest to you.

In nutshell, I would find some kind of moving event that was in my control, like water rushing from a faucet, a cat or dog taking a familiar path across your living room, a toddler you know is always going to do something interesting...I'm sure you get the idea.

Then find out how to take control over those "fast features" (if you even have to do anything at all beyond selecting a shooting mode), put the camera on a tripod or set it on a flat surface, get the moving event properly framed, and give it a go using the rapid sequence feature, where the camera just clicks away a number of times as fast as it can. The idea is to make sure the camera doesn't budge even a millimeter if you manage it, and that the object of the photo is sure to stay in the frame -- something impossible to do at a sporting event or car race.

It might be really surprising all the gold nuggets that would pop out of the Casio in terms of being really striking photos, because it sounds like it's a big strength with that model.
As I said, I am still working on learning how to make it work, it does take amazing pictures, very very fast, it has 2 CPU's instead if only 1, and it has got an amazing slow motion video mode.
Same with the pictures; I took a serie of pictures of a person jumping to the water, diving, it looks like a movie, and then you can select just one of the stills.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
As I said, I am still working on learning how to make it work, it does take amazing pictures, very very fast, it has 2 CPU's instead if only 1, and it has got an amazing slow motion video mode.
Same with the pictures; I took a serie of pictures of a person jumping to the water, diving, it looks like a movie, and then you can select just one of the stills.
Sounds like you've already got a good handle on that camera already.

And now I'm curious about the video on mine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I'm gonna buy one of those pocket cameras because Mexico eats all the other ones I've had. Dust and moisture just seems to be too much for them. I never pay over $500 but still too much with the current record. Friend bought a $1000+ something with detachable lenses and it lasted 4 months .... humidity on the coast?

Cheap or one of those underwater ones encased in a plastic box
Yeah, SLRs are great in many, many ways, but humidity and dust get into the camera body (no matter what you do), because of the detachable lenses. Change a lens in the field and one tiny spec of dust can land on the sensor plate. The small electrical charge in that part of the camera galvanizes the dust spec to the transparent film covering the actual sensor, and you have ugly spots in the sky portion of your pictures, from now on since it often can't be completely removed even at a camera shop.

I'm sure your friend was very disappointed...

The point-and-shoot camera body is a closed system, so no dust problems, but I'm sure high humidity will play havoc on any camera.
 
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