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Discussion Starter #1
hi

my family and i are planning on moving to the benidorm area january next year,theres myself my husband and my 2 children ages 4 and 8.

can anybody give me any advise on what areas are nice to live,what schools are good in the area,etc etc
we plan on coming over soon to have a good look round,we have lived in spain before so we know some of what we have to do,im not sure on the schooling side as my son wasnt school age when we lived previously.

thanks elle
 

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hi

my family and i are planning on moving to the benidorm area january next year,theres myself my husband and my 2 children ages 4 and 8.

can anybody give me any advise on what areas are nice to live,what schools are good in the area,etc etc
we plan on coming over soon to have a good look round,we have lived in spain before so we know some of what we have to do,im not sure on the schooling side as my son wasnt school age when we lived previously.

thanks elle
Children must go to school in Spain from the ages of 6. So for your 8 year old, starting this school year, she/he will be in Year 2 (or if she or he is 9 this year, Year 3).

My daughter is nearly 8 and is in Year 2 and enjoys it. She is the only English speaker in her class and has picked up the language really well. The school gives no help for foreign children but at 8, children will pick it up after a while. I did pay for a tutor to help my children and homework help...a bit pricy but worth it!

The school my children go to starts at 9.30am and finishes at 2.30pm. They can stay for lunch which is about 2.80 euros a day and it is a hot and healthy as well as being typically spanish...some British kids have a bit of a problem eating it (I know mine would!!). But I pick them up and have lunch together.

To join the school, you would have to speak with them and take some paperwork. They would want : your empradon, some passport photos, medical information(ask your doctor for a print off of the childs vaccines before you come), and healthcare information (private or social).

When I went, my children could start the next day...

You will have to check, if they have space first. When we moved to the North of Spain, we went to the school around the corner but there was no space. We had to wait for the spanish equivilent of the UK's LEA, to tell us where our children could go. So the school they now go to is miles away so it's a bit annoying having to get in the car everyday. Never mind.

Your 8 year old should settle in well, Benidorm will no doubt have lots of expats around who can help.

It would be best if you come out and had a look around, go to the Town Hall and ask where the schools are and ask some of the parents who are at these school gates waiting for their children.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
hi northen lass
thanks for the advise !
which area are you in?
do your children now speak spanish fluently,if so how long did it take them
ive started learning spanish myself,and am teaching my children,so weve got a year to get the basics
you mentioned an empradon,what is this?
will i need a padron and an nie number for the school?
my daughter will be 4 when we move,will she go to playgroup (free) like they do here or does she have to wait til shes 6 to start school?

thanks again
elle
 

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hi northen lass
thanks for the advise !
which area are you in?
do your children now speak spanish fluently,if so how long did it take them
ive started learning spanish myself,and am teaching my children,so weve got a year to get the basics
you mentioned an empradon,what is this?
will i need a padron and an nie number for the school?
my daughter will be 4 when we move,will she go to playgroup (free) like they do here or does she have to wait til shes 6 to start school?

thanks again
elle
the padron is the register of residents

you need that, residencia, passports copies, medicals & other stuff to get your child into school
I know that sounds a bit vague, but it can vary a bit from area to area - so best to ask locally when you have decided exactly where you'll be

children in most areas can start infant school (if places are available) from around 2.5 years
 

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hi northen lass
thanks for the advise !
which area are you in?
do your children now speak spanish fluently,if so how long did it take them
ive started learning spanish myself,and am teaching my children,so weve got a year to get the basics
you mentioned an empradon,what is this?
will i need a padron and an nie number for the school?
my daughter will be 4 when we move,will she go to playgroup (free) like they do here or does she have to wait til shes 6 to start school?

thanks again
elle
Hi again.

I live in Asturias.

My son who is 6 is the most fluent in spanish (for a child anyway).

My daughter who is 7 is very shy and I think that although she understands spanish and everything that her teacher, friends and spanish cartoons she is not as good as speaking it. She only really speaks to her friends in spanish but thats all that's important to 7 year olds anyway.

But we have only been her in Asturias for over a year.

If you get into a school with more spanish children it will be so much better for the children to learn. It would also help to allow your children only to watch spanish cartoons and not English.

As for your 4 year old daughter, most schools have classes for children from the ages of 3. The school my children go to, there are classes for 3 year olds, 4 year olds and 5 year olds. My son last year was in the 5 year old class and loved it. He had a lovely teacher and there was only about 12 children in the class.

3 to 5 year olds do not have to go but it is available and I would recommend it.

The school year is different here in Spain to the UK.

In the UK its birthdays from September to August are together.

In Spain its January to December. So a child born on 2nd Jan 2002 and 23rd December 2002 are in the same class .

As for the empradon - it's a document which means you are registered with the Town Hall, similar to the electrol roll in the UK. This document shows the school that you live where you say you do.

To get this document, you would need to take your passports, your NIE (for the children too usually), rental contract.

Quite a lot of paperwork at first but once it done, its done. I am assuming you already have an NIE with being here before. If not, it a visit to the Police Station - this time with your passport and passport photos and birth certificates.

So first port of call would be to find out which school you want your children to go to, check they have places. Find a house to rent then then go to the Town Hall and get your empradon.

Getting the basics in spanish for your children will be fun - mine knew colours and numbers and hello - simple stuff.

What I would say that if children are younger than 9 the language will not be a problem, so relax in that area.

You would need to make it a priority. Get some confidence in speaking it, Find an intercambio now - you may have some spanish speakers nearby who want to practice English and you practice spanish with them.

Learning Spanish has been harder than I expected. For us adults it is a lengthy process - at least 4 or 5 years to get good and that's with lessons and practice. So get starting it if you really want to make it a success.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thanks again,northern lass

you have been very helpfull, just one more thing all theese things pardron,empradon residency cert. etc,do i get them same day or do i have to wait for them?

thanks
elle
 

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The school gives no help for foreign children but at 8, children will pick it up after a while. I did pay for a tutor to help my children and homework help...a bit pricy but worth it!

I would say it depends on which school your children attend as my grandchildren who attend state school have had lots of help. The school has only 12 foreign pupils and they are not all Brits tutors them in Spanish and also has a teacher to help with their pronouncation.
Maiden
 

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The school gives no help for foreign children but at 8, children will pick it up after a while. I did pay for a tutor to help my children and homework help...a bit pricy but worth it!

I would say it depends on which school your children attend as my grandchildren who attend state school have had lots of help. The school has only 12 foreign pupils and they are not all Brits tutors them in Spanish and also has a teacher to help with their pronouncation.
Maiden
they get tons of extra help in our area too - it has to be said that it's a very 'international' area though
 

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thanks again,northern lass

you have been very helpfull, just one more thing all theese things pardron,empradon residency cert. etc,do i get them same day or do i have to wait for them?

thanks
elle
I got the empradon straight away. The lady keyed in all the information on a computer and printed off there and then.

The NIE was more lengthy. My husband waited in a queue outside the police station (Marbella) from about 7am. And he wasn't the first in the queue ! I think the first 50 got a ticket - if you didn't get one you'd have to turn up the next day and try again.

Then we had to return the following week....

(I had a file with photocopies of everything to keep it all together)

I think most do it by appointment only. Every area is different and they change their procedures all the time...
 

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they get tons of extra help in our area too - it has to be said that it's a very 'international' area though

My daughter doesn't live in an international area it is very Spanish so learning Spanish is a must. On another note my grandson is often called into an English class and asked if he can understand what the pupils are saying.. he has asked me if he can charge for this lol

Maiden
 

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they get tons of extra help in our area too - it has to be said that it's a very 'international' area though
I think there is no help for foreign children here because there just isn't the numbers or the expectation.

There is just one Romanian, one Brazilan and my three from the UK. Plus my children had a good understanding of spanish when we arrived up here too.

Back in the CDS, they had much more help...but it was hindered because there was too many British kids speaking English. But you have to get by as best you can..with whats available.

But Elle - don't worry about the language for the kids, with or without help they will pick up the language. Just choose a school with low students who speak English. Just as we would tend to choose a school in the Uk with less children who speak English as a second langugage..
 

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My daughter doesn't live in an international area it is very Spanish so learning Spanish is a must. On another note my grandson is often called into an English class and asked if he can understand what the pupils are saying.. he has asked me if he can charge for this lol

Maiden
:clap2:

my 2 are always being asked to translate for parents & new kids - there's a sort of 'buddy' system where the new ones get a bit of help from an 'old' one - as in one who can speak Spanish

they wanted to charge too - but I told them they'd be doing mummy out of a job - they were willing to undercut me:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
thanks all for your advice :)

another question how do you go about getting health care now,when i was there last all you needed was your E111 and you got free care,is it still the same?
thanks
elle
 

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My three all attend a Spanish state school here in NW Spain. They were the only British kids there - one has recently joined primary, but he went through the earlier school system and could speak Spanish fluently. Before we arrived (over four years ago now), they attended a few Spanish lessons so they could say a few things - but the school was brilliant. For the first few months they provided apoyo classes to get them up to speed on the languages here - Castellano and Gallego. They usually did this when the other kids were doing English lessons. Not a problem and after that they soon became fluent (they joined at ages 7 and 6). The twins were separated as the teachers felt they would rely on each other too much. I think what was an extra push as well was that they weren't held back a year - they were literally thrown in at the deep end, but it maintained their levels of education. In fact, I would say standards in subjects such as maths, are far higher here anyway.

Elle, at the ages your kids are, please do consider the state system as they wouldn't have a problem with the language after a short period. Yes, a few tears at first, but ours were lucky and have made some great friends. The only problem now is maintaining their English - they rarely speak it anymore.:)
 

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Your E111 (now replaced by the EHIC) entitles you to emergency treatment only.
You will need to pay into the Spanish health system before you get 'free' health care. Not sure how you go about that but there's loads of info on this site in various threads.
 

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Elle, you'll need form E106 which will tide you over for a while until you are up and running - info below.


Healthcare provided under the E106

If you move to an EEA country to live but not work and don't receive a UK benefit, you may be eligible for up to two-and-a-half years of state healthcare, paid for by the UK.

You will need to apply for an E106 with the the Overseas Healthcare Team (Newcastle) and prove that you have worked in the UK and paid National Insurance contributions up to three years before your departure.

For further advice, contact the Overseas Healthcare Team (Newcastle)

Overseas Healthcare Team (Newcastle)
Room TC001
Tyneview Park
Whitley Road
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE98 1BA

Tel: 0191 218 1999 (Monday to Friday 8am-5pm)

The E106 will entitle you to treatment on the same basis as a resident of the country you moving to. This may mean that you have to make a patient contribution to the cost of your care.

When the cover on the E106 expires, you cannot get any further medical cover from the UK until you are in receipt of a UK state pension. It is up to the country’s authorities to decided whether you are eligible to join their healthcare scheme.


 

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Discussion Starter #17
My three all attend a Spanish state school here in NW Spain. They were the only British kids there - one has recently joined primary, but he went through the earlier school system and could speak Spanish fluently. Before we arrived (over four years ago now), they attended a few Spanish lessons so they could say a few things - but the school was brilliant. For the first few months they provided apoyo classes to get them up to speed on the languages here - Castellano and Gallego. They usually did this when the other kids were doing English lessons. Not a problem and after that they soon became fluent (they joined at ages 7 and 6). The twins were separated as the teachers felt they would rely on each other too much. I think what was an extra push as well was that they weren't held back a year - they were literally thrown in at the deep end, but it maintained their levels of education. In fact, I would say standards in subjects such as maths, are far higher here anyway.

Elle, at the ages your kids are, please do consider the state system as they wouldn't have a problem with the language after a short period. Yes, a few tears at first, but ours were lucky and have made some great friends. The only problem now is maintaining their English - they rarely speak it anymore.:)

im definatly sending them to state school,like most parents i worry,but everyones advice has helped loads.
thanks
 

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im definatly sending them to state school,like most parents i worry,but everyones advice has helped loads.
thanks
If mine were that age I'd send mine to state too!! International schools are good and they do integrate them and teach them fluent Spanish BUT, they are extortionate !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Jo xxx
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Elle, you'll need form E106 which will tide you over for a while until you are up and running - info below.


Healthcare provided under the E106

If you move to an EEA country to live but not work and don't receive a UK benefit, you may be eligible for up to two-and-a-half years of state healthcare, paid for by the UK.

You will need to apply for an E106 with the the Overseas Healthcare Team (Newcastle) and prove that you have worked in the UK and paid National Insurance contributions up to three years before your departure.

For further advice, contact the Overseas Healthcare Team (Newcastle)

Overseas Healthcare Team (Newcastle)
Room TC001
Tyneview Park
Whitley Road
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE98 1BA

Tel: 0191 218 1999 (Monday to Friday 8am-5pm)

The E106 will entitle you to treatment on the same basis as a resident of the country you moving to. This may mean that you have to make a patient contribution to the cost of your care.

When the cover on the E106 expires, you cannot get any further medical cover from the UK until you are in receipt of a UK state pension. It is up to the country’s authorities to decided whether you are eligible to join their healthcare scheme.
thanks for the advice,thats great
 
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