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Hello All,
Was wondering if anyone could tell me some of the first steps I would need to do in order to become autonomo in Spain.
Thank you
Joe
 

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autonomo in spain

Hello All,
Was wondering if anyone could tell me some of the first steps I would need to do in order to become autonomo in Spain.
Thank you
Joe
Hola Joe,

Best thing is to go to a gestoría, and they take you through all the paperwork. It isn't that complicated. They do all your tax for you too.
 

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Is there any other sort?

Seriously, any gestor can get you organised. The fact that you even asked the question, leads me to conclude that "no" you should not do it yourself.
 

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I'm autonoma and I do the paperwork myself with my Spanish husband. If you don't speak Spanish I would recommend going to a gestoria. If you do speak Spanish it means going to the local tax office (go there first) and then to the INEM office. Ask them which forms you need and go through the papers with the people there. If you get the right person then it's not too painful a process. If the person is a typical fucionario and is very unhelpful just stick to your guns until you get the info you need. If it gets too complicated you can always get someone to do it for you.
By the way you can go on and off the register as many times as you want so if you've got a lean month coming up you can "darte de baja". Just make sure you go back on again when you need to.
 

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Like Pesky Wesky I am also autonoma, and I also found that the people at the Hacienda and Seguridad Social just filled out the forms for me....it's a two minute job. But it does depend on the attitude of the person on the counter on the day.

If you don't need to open a shop or have an office there is nothing else to do and you can be up and running within 24 hours. However, if you do have some kind of business premises there are a few more steps to the process.
 

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autonomos/ self employed

Like Pesky Wesky I am also autonoma, and I also found that the people at the Hacienda and Seguridad Social just filled out the forms for me....it's a two minute job. But it does depend on the attitude of the person on the counter on the day.

If you don't need to open a shop or have an office there is nothing else to do and you can be up and running within 24 hours. However, if you do have some kind of business premises there are a few more steps to the process.
That's true, i suppose it depends on what you want to do exactly
 

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This may also be of some help to you Jobockus ..... Sue :plane:

Being Autonomo in Spain

The other way of working in Spain for a company is as an "autonomo". This is like being self employed in the UK but with a few differences. You will find that many jobs in Spain will take you on under an autonomo basis.

To become autonomo in Spain you will need the services of a gestor (similar to an accountant). They will register you with the hacienda (tax office) as being self employed and will do your quarterly and annual accounts. Make sure you choose a good, English speaking gestoria as you will be relying on them to work out your IVA (VAT) and tax returns each quarter.

As an autonomo in Spain you will have to pay, by direct debit, your social security each month. Currently the minimum is around 235€ per month. This means that you are entitled to use the Spanish "national health" system and also receive a pension when you retire. You can opt to pay higher levers of social security for additional benefits and higher pensions.

If you are offered a job in Spain that requires you to be autonomo make sure you take the additional costs YOU will encounter. Obviously your social security but don't forget your accountancy fees (expect to pay around 60€ per month).

You will have to raise an invoice for your "wages" each month so you will have to either pay your gestor extra to do this on your behalf or simply raise them yourself, but you will have to keep proper records. If you are invoicing a company as an autonomo you will also have to include Impuesto sobre la Renta de las Personas Físicas (IRPF).

As an autonomo in Spain you pay tax and your IVA (VAT) every quarter. Then at the end of the year (January to December) you need to have your annual accounts done (does not have to be submitted until June of the following year). Each quarter you are required to pay 20% tax on your income (after expenses have been taken into account).

When you invoice a company you include a deduction of 15% IRPF which means that the company you invoice retains the 15% of the tax on your behalf and pays it at the end of the year. You then need to make up the additional 5% each quarter. It's really a way of stopping auotonomo's working for a few months and then dissapperaing without paying their tax.

In Spain you do not need a VAT number as your NIE number will be your equivalent. There is no exemption from charging IVA, the smallest company / business must charge IVA where applicable (currently 16%).

Each quarter you must present your invoices (payments in and out) to your gestoria so that they can work out your IVA bill and your tax bill. You do this each quarter and at the end of the year everything is totalled up to see whether you owe additional tax or are due a rebate.

Somthing to remember about being autonomo and your expenses is that all car related expenses (petrol, maintenance, etc) for most jobs in Spain as an autonomo and telephone bills, is that you can only deduct 50% of the expense as they assume a 50/50 split between your job in Spain and your personal life in Spain.
 

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I don't think we know if Jobockus is a Spanish speaker or not, or if he will be a costa or city dweller.

Anyway, if he does speak Spanish I wouldn't go to one of the English speaking gestors....expect to pay inflated prices. 60 euros a month would be quite extortionate for a simple autonomo. Back when I used to bother wth gestores I used to pay 30 euros a quarter (10 euros a month). Now I don't bother.

Also, the article says that there is no exemption from paying IVA. However, this depends on the nature of your business. I am exempt from paying IVA and I am also exempt from having to do the quarterly IRPF forms.
 

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This may also be of some help to you Jobockus ..... Sue :plane:

Being Autonomo in Spain

The other way of working in Spain for a company is as an "autonomo". This is like being self employed in the UK but with a few differences. You will find that many jobs in Spain will take you on under an autonomo basis.

To become autonomo in Spain you will need the services of a gestor (similar to an accountant). They will register you with the hacienda (tax office) as being self employed and will do your quarterly and annual accounts. Make sure you choose a good, English speaking gestoria as you will be relying on them to work out your IVA (VAT) and tax returns each quarter.

As an autonomo in Spain you will have to pay, by direct debit, your social security each month. Currently the minimum is around 235€ per month. This means that you are entitled to use the Spanish "national health" system and also receive a pension when you retire. You can opt to pay higher levers of social security for additional benefits and higher pensions.

If you are offered a job in Spain that requires you to be autonomo make sure you take the additional costs YOU will encounter. Obviously your social security but don't forget your accountancy fees (expect to pay around 60€ per month).

You will have to raise an invoice for your "wages" each month so you will have to either pay your gestor extra to do this on your behalf or simply raise them yourself, but you will have to keep proper records. If you are invoicing a company as an autonomo you will also have to include Impuesto sobre la Renta de las Personas Físicas (IRPF).

As an autonomo in Spain you pay tax and your IVA (VAT) every quarter. Then at the end of the year (January to December) you need to have your annual accounts done (does not have to be submitted until June of the following year). Each quarter you are required to pay 20% tax on your income (after expenses have been taken into account).

When you invoice a company you include a deduction of 15% IRPF which means that the company you invoice retains the 15% of the tax on your behalf and pays it at the end of the year. You then need to make up the additional 5% each quarter. It's really a way of stopping auotonomo's working for a few months and then dissapperaing without paying their tax.

In Spain you do not need a VAT number as your NIE number will be your equivalent. There is no exemption from charging IVA, the smallest company / business must charge IVA where applicable (currently 16%).

Each quarter you must present your invoices (payments in and out) to your gestoria so that they can work out your IVA bill and your tax bill. You do this each quarter and at the end of the year everything is totalled up to see whether you owe additional tax or are due a rebate.

Somthing to remember about being autonomo and your expenses is that all car related expenses (petrol, maintenance, etc) for most jobs in Spain as an autonomo and telephone bills, is that you can only deduct 50% of the expense as they assume a 50/50 split between your job in Spain and your personal life in Spain.
I think it must depend on your circumstances Sue, but I've never had to use gestor. As a freelance teacher, with no office and no employees and being exempt from certain things it seems my cirumstances are less complicated. I do my own invoicing for example (I just send a bill every month to my clients, it's not complicated) and I don't I present invoices every quarter to anyone; it's not necessary, so while there's a lot of good info here, nothing's written in stone.:)
 

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I think it must depend on your circumstances Sue, but I've never had to use gestor. As a freelance teacher, with no office and no employees and being exempt from certain things it seems my cirumstances are less complicated. I do my own invoicing for example (I just send a bill every month to my clients, it's not complicated) and I don't I present invoices every quarter to anyone; it's not necessary, so while there's a lot of good info here, nothing's written in stone.:)
Agree completely Pesky .... thats why I said it may help rather than it being a definitive answer. I do think it depends on your level of understanding of the system and your Spanish of course :D my OH for example doesnt have an office, employees etc but is autonomo and uses a Gestor because our Spanish isnt at a level that we feel comfortable with when dealing with taxes etc ...... its the returns that we use him for mainly.

Sue x :ranger:
 

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Hey Pesky,

Just need some info,
I live in Cataluña,
When I got my NIE everyone said how hard it was and how I had to pay someone to do it for me, but I did it myself and it was easy and I had no problems,
When I got a car I was told I had to pay someone..... but did it myself,

So now I want to become Autónomo i'm hearing I have to pay a Gestoria, but would rather find out how to do it myself,
Where was your first port of call?
 

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Hey Pesky,

Just need some info,
I live in Cataluña,
When I got my NIE everyone said how hard it was and how I had to pay someone to do it for me, but I did it myself and it was easy and I had no problems,
When I got a car I was told I had to pay someone..... but did it myself,

So now I want to become Autónomo i'm hearing I have to pay a Gestoria, but would rather find out how to do it myself,
Where was your first port of call?
Look at post 347 on this thread
http://www.expatforum.com/expats/sp...ng-spain/26226-teaching-english-spain-35.html
Can't guarantee it's foolproof and of course in Catalonia it's likely to be different, but you can give it a try. I think just going to the tax office and asking is a possibility as well, just make sure you've got enough time 'cos most times you have a long wait.
Lastly there's this, which includes a video about going autonomo.
Guide to Spain's autonomo system
Be nice to know what you're going to be doing and how you like living in Catalonia
 
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