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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have a recommendation (or anti-recommendation) for an English speaking lawyer in western Umbria who might be able to advise and guide me on purchasing or renting a property? (Note: I may have to change my handle. :) ) How about an inspector/surveyor? Has anyone used a galoppino, do you recommend using one, and if so do you have a suggestion?


I've been using this site as a guide:
https://www.justlanded.com/english/Italy/Italy-Guide/Property/Introduction
 

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I lived in Orvieto, there was one there who spoke good/perfect english. First name was Alessandro, he worked with the Commune. I'm sure that if you ask at the Anagraphe, registry office, in the same building as the offices of the Commune they will know who you are asking for (Alessandro the avocato) and hopefully make an appointment for you with him. He is well versed in everything. Orvieto shouldn't be too far from where you are (western umbria) and could lead to another connection if he is unavailable.
Orvieto centrale, not Orvieto Scalo.
 

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To add: He helped us with immigration. We had to get an apostile on our marraige certificate and he guided my immigration to the elective retirement one even though my husband is UK, which was a bit over kill but eventually I got my permesso straightened out. It was the medical unsurance that was so difficult. Private insurance would have been cheaper than what I had to pay for national health care! Allesandro is very helpful and reasonable rates.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
To add: He helped us with immigration. We had to get an apostile on our marraige certificate and he guided my immigration to the elective retirement one even though my husband is UK, which was a bit over kill but eventually I got my permesso straightened out. It was the medical unsurance that was so difficult. Private insurance would have been cheaper than what I had to pay for national health care! Allesandro is very helpful and reasonable rates.
I have had to return to the United States. Before I return to Italy I would like to make an appointment with a lawyer so if you could find his full name, on some old document perhaps, it would be useful.

What did it cost you, as a non-EU citizen, to be on national health care?
 

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Vignoli sounds right! The health care was nearly 400 euros. That was not usual though. If you get a permesso, normally I think you should be able to get onto italian national health care, which I thought was practically free. Best wishes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Vignoli sounds right! The health care was nearly 400 euros. That was not usual though. If you get a permesso, normally I think you should be able to get onto italian national health care, which I thought was practically free. Best wishes.
I'm not entirely sure I followed that. Am I correct in reading this as your saying that, having a Permesso, being on national healthcare cost you nearly 400 Euros per month?

The forum won't let me "thank" you twice in succession but please know that I appreciate the information.
 

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Yes, It is confusing. I think there was a mistake made. I did not know it though, so at the time when I went to apply for italian health care they asked me to pay this fee and I did. I have since learned that once you have residency and the permesso you get the natiional italian health care at the same rate as italians, which for people my age, retired, is free if not very inexpensive.
By now things may be more streamlined, I was doing this back in 2011! It seemed all the people who worked in the offices were pretty much clueless on how the EU immigration laws worked. Each person seemed to have a different view on what should be done, which papers should be filled out and how much should be paid. It got very complicated but eventually we finished all the paper work and were legal in Italy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes, It is confusing. I think there was a mistake made. I did not know it though, so at the time when I went to apply for italian health care they asked me to pay this fee and I did. I have since learned that once you have residency and the permesso you get the natiional italian health care at the same rate as italians, which for people my age, retired, is free if not very inexpensive.
By now things may be more streamlined, I was doing this back in 2011! It seemed all the people who worked in the offices were pretty much clueless on how the EU immigration laws worked. Each person seemed to have a different view on what should be done, which papers should be filled out and how much should be paid. It got very complicated but eventually we finished all the paper work and were legal in Italy.
So, while you paid 400E/mo that was in error.

I gather from your comments that you applied for your PdS in Italy. Is that correct? I thought you had to apply at a consulate in your home country.

It occurs to me that should I get a lawyer for my residence needs he could possibly also help with my residency.
 

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I got a visa to go to Italy from the US, a lot of paper work and expense, supposedly gave me extended leave to stay, which was also done incorrectly, as we found out from Alessandro, it gave me no more than the usual 90 days anybody gets with a US passport. My husband has UK citizenship through his father, so once we arrived we at first sought the family of an eu citizen type residency for me. Well, they could not seem to get their heads around that at the time so alessandro had my husband just go with the EU citiizen of the UK residency status, unfortunately, because he had not resided in UK he could not ever apply for any health care in italy, we were told he was obligated to get private italian health insurance. Then I was admitted to Italy as an elective resident with retirement funds. Like I mentioned the complications were nearly endless and the paper work and little fees here and there amazing. Whats more my fingerprints were so light they had to redo them a few times, they said at the police station that I must have not used rubber gloves for doing house work and the chemicals had made my figerprints weak. Italy was a lot of fun, we may still have to go back if BRexit does not give us freedom of movement in europe I guess! Again, all the best, slow but sure, one foot in front of the other, all things are possible.
 

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I believe the quasi 400 euro was for a trimester of coverage, the private health insurance we got in italy was a lot lower than that even.
 

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RetireinRome, if you do not have an Italian passport and you are interested in retiring in Italy, you must first get permission to remain in Italy longer than 90 days. You get this permission by applying for an elective residence visa at the Italian consulate which has jurisdiction for the US state you live in.

If your visa is approved at the consulate, you may then come to Italy and apply for a residence permit in the city you choose to live in. But you MUST start out at the consulate before you leave the USA. Do NOT come to Italy without a visa and expect to get anything done with regard to residence. Without a visa, you are an American tourist who is allowed to stay in Italy 90 days only on your American passport and an Italian lawyer cannot help you.

Once you obtain residence, you can sign up for National healthcare. I am a retired Italian citizen and there is no yearly fee for me. Foreigners pay a yearly fee but I don't know what the rule is for a retired foreigner. It might depend on your income.
 

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Please try to take this one step at a time:

1. Go to your Italian consulate in USA. Apply for an Elective Residence Visa. If visa is NOT approved STOP. You do not have permission to retire in Italy.

2. If Visa is approved, come to Italy with your visa documentation from the consulate and apply for Pdis (permesso sogiorno) in the city where you intend to live.

3. When Pdis is approved, apply for National healthcare.
 
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