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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

Just seeking some advice regarding moving to Germany next year.

I’m Australian born, and have a defacto partner of 6 years with an almost 1 year old child. She is a German citizen and also an Australian permanent resident of 3 years.

We want to move next year so she is closer to her family. We are both trained school teachers here in Australia.

When we move, she will want to start teaching again, however, being from the hospitality industry, I’m quite keen to get back into working in coffee. I have a friend who I can work for as soon as I arrive, and I’ll be looking to open my own shop in the next 18 months with my future business partner (who is a German citizen).

I’m just trying to figure out what’s the best option for me to get working rights, and what I need to apply for.

I know that if we get married that makes everything much easier, but I don’t want to get married simply for the sake of a visa.

With that in mind, do I need to have a work contract lined up before I apply for a working visa? Further to that, would their immigration look at granting a trained teacher a visa over someone who simply wants to work in a coffee shop/roastery?

Also, with respect to moving over - could we move over at the same time, or would they need to go first, and then I apply for a family reunification visa?

The grand plan would be for us to move over together, she would stay with her parents in Dortmund for the first month or so whilst I work in Hamburg and we look for an apartment to live in together. Once that’s sorted we’d be living under the 1 roof and both working.

Thanks in anticipation!


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First things first - Germany doesn't recognize "de facto" partnerships, even if you have a child together. So, unless you do get married, you're on your own as far as getting a work visa - which usually means you either have to have a work contract lined up before you move, or you have to find a job within three months of your arrival. Your friend may or may not be able to "sponsor" you for a work visa - it generally involves more than just offering you a job. There is usually a process the employer has to go through to get work authorization (i.e. to hire a foreigner).

OK, now if you do decide to get married, you'll need to find out the requirements for a spouse visa for Germany. "Family reunification" is only for foreigners living in Germany who want to bring their family members to Germany to live with them. It's a different process as the spouse of a German citizen. Check with your local German consulate for details.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply Bev,

Do you know enough to tell me that if I was to get a visa as a skilled worker (teacher qualifies as this I think) can I then work in another field - or am I restricted to one profession?


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Hi everyone,

Just seeking some advice regarding moving to Germany next year.

I’m Australian born, and have a defacto partner of 6 years with an almost 1 year old child. She is a German citizen and also an Australian permanent resident of 3 years.

We want to move next year so she is closer to her family. We are both trained school teachers here in Australia.

When we move, she will want to start teaching again, however, being from the hospitality industry, I’m quite keen to get back into working in coffee. I have a friend who I can work for as soon as I arrive, and I’ll be looking to open my own shop in the next 18 months with my future business partner (who is a German citizen).

I’m just trying to figure out what’s the best option for me to get working rights, and what I need to apply for.

I know that if we get married that makes everything much easier, but I don’t want to get married simply for the sake of a visa.

With that in mind, do I need to have a work contract lined up before I apply for a working visa? Further to that, would their immigration look at granting a trained teacher a visa over someone who simply wants to work in a coffee shop/roastery?

Also, with respect to moving over - could we move over at the same time, or would they need to go first, and then I apply for a family reunification visa?

The grand plan would be for us to move over together, she would stay with her parents in Dortmund for the first month or so whilst I work in Hamburg and we look for an apartment to live in together. Once that’s sorted we’d be living under the 1 roof and both working.

Thanks in anticipation!


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Hm. Difficult.

If you are young enough, you could apply for a youth mobility visa but that would not enable you to open your own business.

First of all, you and your partner should check whether your Australian qualifications enable you to teach in Germany/the Bundesland of your choice at all:

https://www.anerkennung-in-deutschland.de/html/de/lehrer.php

I am not sure how easy a family reunion visa to join your German child would be, especially since you are not planning to live in the same household (not even the same Bundesland, so two alien departments would be involved, etc.) right away.

https://www.berlin.de/willkommenszentrum/en/families/reunification-of-families/

For a visa in your own right, you'd have to find an employer who would be willing and able to sponsor you for a work visa. If your job is not on the white list (and coffee shop jobs aren't) it will be difficult to get a work permit, since your employer would be hard-pressed to explain how he cannot find a German/EEA person to work in his coffee shop.

Teachers are sorely needed, though (yet, not on white list, probably due to langauge?). Do you speak fluent German? If not you may be limited to international/bilingual schools. Not sure whether schools would be able/willing to sponsor a non-EEA employee.

Such a work permit would be tied to a specific employer, so again, opening your own business would be difficult and you would have to apply for a different residence permit before you could go ahead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Interesting. Many thanks for all that info.

I’m currently going through the Goethe institute - I’ll at level 2A in my proficiency and speak interchangeably at home in English and German - not sure how I’d feel about teaching in the language though just yet.

Say we were to live under the same roof right away - would that enable me to get a reunification visa? Seems really difficult to get a work permit without any restrictions!


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Interesting. Many thanks for all that info.

I’m currently going through the Goethe institute - I’ll at level 2A in my proficiency and speak interchangeably at home in English and German - not sure how I’d feel about teaching in the language though just yet.

Say we were to live under the same roof right away - would that enable me to get a reunification visa? Seems really difficult to get a work permit without any restrictions!


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As I said, I am not sure how much things would be complicated by you living relatively far away from your child. In this document, addresses and registration certificates are asked for (I assume to determine the alien department that would then issue your residence permit):

http://m.germania.diplo.de/contentblob/3651114/Daten/7445626/fzzminderjaehrigkind.pdf

While the German Embassy says that Australians can apply directly at the alien department without getting entry clearance (a visa) first, you wouldn't be able to work until the permit is issued and I don't know how the Ausländerbehörde where you want to live deals with applications - can you show up and take a number? Will your application be accepted right away? Will your permit be issued on the spot? Will they just give you an appointment to submit your application several months in the future? You may or may not need to be able to survive for a few months without being able to work.

German Missions in Australia - Family reunion
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Based on what I read in the family reunification, as long as

a) she has a place to live
b) we are financial (which we are)

I can get full work rights, wether married or civil relationship.

Looks like I better get to the embassy ASAP!


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Check on the family reunification details, though. Normally, "family reunification" does NOT apply to family of German nationals - only to foreign national living in Germany on a visa/resident permit.

And where it says "civil relationship" I believe the Germans require you to have a formal, legal civil union of some sort - not just a "de facto" relationship. BAMF - Bundesamt für Migration und Flüchtlinge - Family reunification
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Based on what I read in the family reunification, as long as

a) she has a place to live
b) we are financial (which we are)

I can get full work rights, wether married or civil relationship.

Looks like I better get to the embassy ASAP!


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You'd have to apply as a parent of a German national. Your partner can only sponsor you if you are married.

Civil partnership (Lebenspartnerschaft) is the German term for same sex marriage. Or was. Recently a law has been passed that allows to call it marriage no matter which genders are involved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Correct me if I’m wrong, but could this be my way in? Reunification with my child who lives (will live) in Germany? We are currently going through the process of organising her German citizenship




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Correct me if I’m wrong, but could this be my way in? Reunification with my child who lives (will live) in Germany? We are currently going through the process of organising her German citizenship




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Have you looked at the links I posted? That's exactly what I was referring to.
 

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Honestly, just get married. Compared to the commitment of having a child together, it's nothing more than a few stamps on a piece of paper, and it will make your life infinitely simpler. I can't see the point of jumping through dozens of extra bureaucratic hoops - with uncertain outcome - just for the sake of being romantic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Have you looked at the links I posted? That's exactly what I was referring to.


Yep - that’s where I found it. Although I was looking at the spouse criteria for ages and didn’t actually see the joining a child criteria for a few hours. Thanks once again for that. Think it will be my route


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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Honestly, just get married. Compared to the commitment of having a child together, it's nothing more than a few stamps on a piece of paper, and it will make your life infinitely simpler. I can't see the point of jumping through dozens of extra bureaucratic hoops - with uncertain outcome - just for the sake of being romantic.


Yeah that’s a fair call, but it’s not just up to me on that one


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Yeah that’s a fair call, but it’s not just up to me on that one
Fair enough. For the spousal negotiation I would suggest the following flow chart:

try -> fail -> wed

A few things come to mind, which I've not had time to research, just a thought.

Does the reunion-with-child approach allow you to work, as opposed to merely live in Germany? Some of the family reunification visas only offer residence, not the right to employment.

Would the reunion-with-child approach work if you're not living in the same Bundesland (let alone the same address) as said child?

Finally, health insurance. Depending on the employment situation, you might be far better off getting on your partner's insurance than trying to find your own. But for this you'd need to be married.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Fair enough. For the spousal negotiation I would suggest the following flow chart:



try -> fail -> wed



A few things come to mind, which I've not had time to research, just a thought.



Does the reunion-with-child approach allow you to work, as opposed to merely live in Germany? Some of the family reunification visas only offer residence, not the right to employment.



Would the reunion-with-child approach work if you're not living in the same Bundesland (let alone the same address) as said child?



Finally, health insurance. Depending on the employment situation, you might be far better off getting on your partner's insurance than trying to find your own. But for this you'd need to be married.


Yep - it allows full rights as I understand.

The only time we’d potentially live in different Bundeslands would be in the first month, as I’ve got a friend who wants to employ me right away. However it would be equally as easy to have a few weeks not working in the Ruhr and getting everything registered etc. it will be fairly easy for her to get work, plus her parents are good people and will look after us.

Ideally we want to be settled in Hamburg within a month of arriving. Staying in Dortmund is just easy to begin with as her family is there.

I’m also going to apply for some teaching jobs in Hamburg - as much as I’m keen to get out of the profession it might just make it easier to begin with.

Health insurance is only €280 per 6 months so I’d just take that out initially to make life easy


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I'd be careful if you're going the parent of a German child route, simply because there may be "custody" or dependence issues to be resolved, especially if you're not living with the "other" parent. Not saying it can't be done, just do your homework and be prepared for the setbacks that may well pop up.
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Bev
 

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Health insurance is only €280 per 6 months so I’d just take that out initially to make life easy
As soon as you register your residence in Germany, German health insurance becomes mandatory and any insurance provider you join when you start working will invoice you from the date of registration, regardless of whether you have some sort of travel insurance. Cost will be a lot higher than €280.

EDIT: Nevertheless, travel insurance is an excellent thing to have until you get into the German system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
As soon as you register your residence in Germany, German health insurance becomes mandatory and any insurance provider you join when you start working will invoice you from the date of registration, regardless of whether you have some sort of travel insurance. Cost will be a lot higher than €280.

EDIT: Nevertheless, travel insurance is an excellent thing to have until you get into the German system.


That is the public health insurance AFAIK. I know employers will pay for your insurance as part of your salary if in FT work, so that’s the obvious aim .

Bev, I get what you are saying about the custody. I think it would be very little time (if any) that we are apart to honest - I’m talking a couple of weeks, and only after we’ve registered our arrival. I’d probably stay with a mate for 2 or so weeks so it wouldn’t really constitute living somewhere else



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