Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I am an Australian married (in Australia, less than 6 months ago) to a French national and we are looking to relocate to France. I have read on this forum about Spouse Visas however the French Consulate website only mentions the "Long Stay Visa for Foreign Spouse of a French citizen".

I'm thinking this is the new name for the former Spouse Visa- is this right? I am also wondering if I can work and if I am entitled to state healthcare (our Medicare equivalent) on the Long Stay Visa, and when this visa expires.

Cheers,

Cris
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
51,911 Posts
Actually, "long stay visa for foreign spouse of a French citizen" is what the visa has always been called. Spouse visa is just the short title. But yes, that's the protocol you'll need to follow.

Getting the spouse visa takes a bit of time, due to the fact that you will need to get a livret de famille (basically registering your marriage with the French) before you can apply for the visa - and if you didn't post the banns before your marriage, be prepared for a bit of a hassle, since some consulates are getting squiffy about this. (French nationals living overseas are supposed to register with and stay in contact with their consulate - though many don't.)

As far as working goes, the short answer is "yes, but" - technically you are authorized to work on arrival, however there is a procedure you have to go through with the OFII that takes priority and practically speaking you won't really be able to look for work until you have the validation in your passport that you have complied with those requirements. Depending on where you settle in France and what level your French is at, count on a good 3 to 6 months before you're able to start looking for a job. Then, job hunting in France moves rather slowly at the best of times.

On state healthcare - it doesn't work like in some countries where residence is all you need. In France, you need to be paying into the cotisation system (social insurances, basically) for a certain period of time before you can receive benefits. The time period is usually about 3 months or so. But, if your French husband has a job and is paying in, his cotisations will cover both him and you until you find a job and start making your own contributions.

One further caveat. French national coverage only reimburses a portion of your health care expenses (usually around 70%, but it varies by service). You normally have a top-up insurance, called a mutuelle, to reimburse the rest, but you have to pay for this on a per-person insured basis. Many, if not most employers offer a mutuelle to their employees (and pay part of the cost).
Cheers,
Bev
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Depending on where you settle in France and what level your French is at, count on a good 3 to 6 months before you're able to start looking for a job. Then, job hunting in France moves rather slowly at the best of times.
Thanks for your advice. We plan to settle in Paris as his family are there. I have read that the state provides 400 hours of French lessons- is this true? I am qualified as a primary school teacher with a degree that is internationally recognised and was hoping to teach English within the school system or teach English to adults. Do you know if this might mean I could start working earlier, as my job would primarily require the use of English?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
51,911 Posts
The 400 hours of French classes is the maximum - and just how many you need is determined as part of your OFII visit. I've heard various reports about just how good the state-run/sponsored lessons are. It seems to vary by departement and just how the local OFII has set them up. Some work through private language schools, and other use government personnel. You'd be well advised to start learning French on your own before you get here.

Your chances of being able to teach in the public schools is pretty much "slim to none." The teachers here are part of the civil service and there is a competitive examination you have to pass (in French) to be allowed to teach in the public schools. There may be a few supplemental jobs teaching young children English through games and songs, but these are generally part time and not terribly well paid.

The issue really isn't whether or not you're "allowed" to work as much as simply finding a job in France. It's a long, hard process even for the native-born here. You may want to consider delaying your move to France until at least your husband has a job to go to, because that will at least give you the health care coverage while you put together a job hunt. (Part of the OFII processing includes a visit to Pole Emploi, where they can help you assess your job possibilities in France.)
Cheers,
Bev
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top