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I have 5 Yrs kid, studying in preschool now in India.

When will move to AUS, how to start looking into proper school? How about Public schools in AUS, are they free for primary education and how's the education quality?

I am little worry about, what can be the impact on my kid when move to AUS. As when move to AUS the language, people & culture will be entirely different.

When move to AUS, what about the kids, are they treated equally as native, what will be the difficulty for them to mix with different people, any extra precautions for foreigner kids are required?

I think for kids it is important to have there own friends to whom they can play and spend time each day. As per me they should not fill alone or lonely their. I am sure this should be for all people who are moving first time. What precautions can be taken care to avoid this.

What is the avg. percentage of Indian students in an AUS public school?[asking this as I am Indian]

Any one who migrated to AUS already and faced similar issues can reply me.....


I think it will be difficult to mix with their people, if any relationship can be established that may be also @ very high level.
Also we always hear abut racism and so on so generally prefer to live on our own. This will be entirely OK for adults but what about the kids?
 

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I have 5 Yrs kid, studying in preschool now in India.

When will move to AUS, how to start looking into proper school? How about Public schools in AUS, are they free for primary education and how's the education quality?

I am little worry about, what can be the impact on my kid when move to AUS. As when move to AUS the language, people & culture will be entirely different.

When move to AUS, what about the kids, are they treated equally as native, what will be the difficulty for them to mix with different people, any extra precautions for foreigner kids are required?

I think for kids it is important to have there own friends to whom they can play and spend time each day. As per me they should not fill alone or lonely their. I am sure this should be for all people who are moving first time. What precautions can be taken care to avoid this.

What is the avg. percentage of Indian students in an AUS public school?[asking this as I am Indian]

Any one who migrated to AUS already and faced similar issues can reply me.....


I think it will be difficult to mix with their people, if any relationship can be established that may be also @ very high level.
Also we always hear abut racism and so on so generally prefer to live on our own. This will be entirely OK for adults but what about the kids?
You will get a better response if you post in the Life in Australia section of the forum

Cheers
 

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I am not Indian but, having lived in Australia for 40 years I have always found Australians to be very open, friendly and generally not racist at all. Australia is well known for being multi-cultural with residents from every part of the world combining to make it one of the most welcoming multi-racial nations in the world.
As for education, I also believe Australia has one of the best education systems in the world and basically free. So, Aussie kids also tend to be open and friendly and care not where you may come from. From my experience, the only 'overseas' people that have a problem making friends here are those that do not want or try to be friendly to Australians. Everything is a two way process :)
You will need to consider where in Australia you think you wish to reside (it's a VERY big country)
Where you decide to live here, you will find there will usually be more than one local school to choose from and you simply need to visit them and register your child. Children are usually expected to go to the local area govt schools so it's easy, unless you want to pay for 'private' education?

My only advice would be that you need to do lots of research to understand 'where' is best for your family to live. Aus is an enormous country with differing climates and work opportunities and costs so you must do your homework on the country well in advance. Good luck :)
 

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Thanks for your valuable information, would like to know the major differences between govt and private schools in oz.

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That's a difficult question and I'm probably not the best person to answer it! My opinion (which has no real value) is that if a child lives in a loving and motivated family then that love and motivation generally influences a child greatly to be those things. Where this is the case, a government school can be just as good as a private one. I'm a believer that the family dictates who & what the child will be and how they will perform and live that life. And that goes for schooling too I believe.
 

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Thanks for your valuable information, would like to know the major differences between govt and private schools in oz.

Sent from my HTC One_M8 using Tapatalk
The latter are expensive. Very expensive. Bursaries are available later for gifted children, but these are fairly scarce. You will also likely find the geographical spread of attending children is higher, whereas govt school students will come from the catchment, making it easier to meet with friends outside school. That said, the quality of education, and especially extra curricular activities, is on the whole better in private schools. I agree with the above: a school cannot compensate for a lack of support in the family.
 

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I think there is a very significant issue that needs pointing out to someone from a 'lesser developed' nation such as India; we obviously tend to think about other nations relative to our experience in our home nation and therefore use that when considering what things are like in a more developed nation. Sometimes this simply cannot be done. My limited experience of India tells me you cannot think of Australia relative to India.... they are very, very different. So, if you think about education in Australia in terms of local govt schooling in India then there is no comparison. It may sound like a silly comparison but.... I would say a decent local govt school in a major Australian city would be much better than most 'private' schools in India. Better trained teachers & better facilities, excellent curriculums, better resources etc etc. I think you would be very surprised how good they are relative to what you have been probably used to in India. If you have lots of money then you may prefer a private school here but as I said earlier, if your family environment is loving and motivated, then you will find that your child will be highly likely to be whatever they want to be, including doctor, scientist, engineer, artist etc. Australian education is well regarded around the world and any certification/degree etc gained here will be positively regarded by employers around the world.
 

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I think there is a very significant issue that needs pointing out to someone from a 'lesser developed' nation such as India; we obviously tend to think about other nations relative to our experience in our home nation and therefore use that when considering what things are like in a more developed nation. Sometimes this simply cannot be done. My limited experience of India tells me you cannot think of Australia relative to India.... they are very, very different. So, if you think about education in Australia in terms of local govt schooling in India then there is no comparison. It may sound like a silly comparison but.... I would say a decent local govt school in a major Australian city would be much better than most 'private' schools in India. Better trained teachers & better facilities, excellent curriculums, better resources etc etc. I think you would be very surprised how good they are relative to what you have been probably used to in India. If you have lots of money then you may prefer a private school here but as I said earlier, if your family environment is loving and motivated, then you will find that your child will be highly likely to be whatever they want to be, including doctor, scientist, engineer, artist etc. Australian education is well regarded around the world and any certification/degree etc gained here will be positively regarded by employers around the world.
Thanks much for your reply, this is what I want to hear.

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When will move to AUS, how to start looking into proper school? How about Public schools in AUS, are they free for primary education and how's the education quality?
It's good, you shouldn't worry.

I am little worry about, what can be the impact on my kid when move to AUS. As when move to AUS the language, people & culture will be entirely different.
Moving a 5 year-old can be quite a challenge, but the school should not be your top concern, IMO. Kids need to be adequately prepared, i.e. you need to talk to your child over and over and over again. Make transition more comfortable by taking some familiar items (e.g. toys, books). Read to your child stories about moving; get that through process going. My point is that you should focus primarily on the emotional impact of the move, more so than school itself.

When move to AUS, what about the kids, are they treated equally as native, what will be the difficulty for them to mix with different people, any extra precautions for foreigner kids are required?
I can't speak for all of Australia, but when my son moved to Australia he was well received. Melbourne is very multicultural and lots of kids in his class were from non-Australian backgrounds. There was never an issue with him being a foreigner here.

What is the avg. percentage of Indian students in an AUS public school?[asking this as I am Indian]
I see where you're coming from and it depends on WHERE in Australia you're moving. I can't help wondering why you would move to Australia and seek fellow Indian students instead of your child integrating in this multicultural environment. Kids are kids - they play, they fight over toys... there's an universal character to that and it makes it much easier for them to communicate and integrate. I would think that gravitating towards Indian children might limit that.


I think it will be difficult to mix with their people, if any relationship can be established that may be also @ very high level.
Also we always hear abut racism and so on so generally prefer to live on our own. This will be entirely OK for adults but what about the kids?
I'm surprised that you would have those expectations. You haven't moved here and even tried to integrate and already you resign yourself to living as a foreigner, among others like you, assuming from the start (actually, before the start) that you are not welcome among "their people" (as you put it). I have moved countries about 7 times and there is something to be said about having a positive attitude and an open mind. Australia is a wonderful country to move to; people and institutions are quite welcoming and open. If you lock yourself out of it before you even get here, you could be missing a lot.
 
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