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So I've just received my spousal settlement visa from the UKBA, all good news.

What happens upon my entry to the UK? Does my wife (UK Citizen) need to be with me and pass through the Non-EU passport control checkpoint with me? Or can she head to the UK citizen lines at passport control?

Any specific paperwork I should have with me and accessible, even though I've already been issued the visa? Basically trying to have my first entry on the settlement visa be as simple as possible!
 

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So I've just received my spousal settlement visa from the UKBA, all good news.

What happens upon my entry to the UK? Does my wife (UK Citizen) need to be with me and pass through the Non-EU passport control checkpoint with me? Or can she head to the UK citizen lines at passport control?

Any specific paperwork I should have with me and accessible, even though I've already been issued the visa? Basically trying to have my first entry on the settlement visa be as simple as possible!
It helps, though not essential, if your wife can accompany you through UK border in the same non-EU line (if they ask, just say you are a couple). They may ask a few questions about housing and finance, so a rental contract and bank statement should be carried. They may remind you about the conditions of the visa, such as no recourse to public funds and period of validity.
 

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So I've just received my spousal settlement visa from the UKBA, all good news.

What happens upon my entry to the UK? Does my wife (UK Citizen) need to be with me and pass through the Non-EU passport control checkpoint with me? Or can she head to the UK citizen lines at passport control?

Any specific paperwork I should have with me and accessible, even though I've already been issued the visa? Basically trying to have my first entry on the settlement visa be as simple as possible!
Hi, and congrats on your visa!

I should think that, for this instance at least, you and your wife would BOTH want to take advantage of the Non-EU passport lane and the (potentially) shorter lines that often accompany that class of passenger.

I was over in late April (on a non-stop flight from Vancouver) and while my flight was quite full, I found that the Non-EU line was waaaay shorter than for passengers from the UK or EU (i.e. most of the passengers on the flight were returning UK citizens/EU residents). I think that there were MAYBE ten people ahead of me in the queue (I was seated at the back of the plane and had to wait for everyone ahead of me to disembark) and I was through customs faster than my fiancé (who was waiting for me outside of the baggage reclaim area) and I thought it would take.

Even when I arrived on December 27, 2011 the Non-EU line was slightly shorter than the UK/EU lines and I got through customs fairly quickly.

I would imagine that if MrsJoe went in the UK queue and you went through the Non-EU queue, whomever cleared customs first would not be allowed to stand around and wait post-customs for the other to come through and would be herded along to the baggage reclaim area to wait. If there were any problems clearing customs for either of you, it would then be difficult to get word to the other person to apprise them of the situation.

For sentimental reasons as well (if you and MrsJoe are into that sort of thing), it would be meaningful for the both of you to do YOUR first post-spousal visa entry into the UK together in the Non-EU line (I don't know which line you will qualify for in subsequent trips).
 

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It's not the question of shorter passport queue or convenience, but the UK spouse being there in person should the immigration officer want to ask questions or get a confirmation from the British partner. Also her presence will help allay any suspicions the officer may hold about the authenticity of marriage.

After the initial entry, subsequent re-entry should be routine and the couple can go through separate passport lines.
 

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Hi, and congrats on your visa!

I should think that, for this instance at least, you and your wife would BOTH want to take advantage of the Non-EU passport lane and the (potentially) shorter lines that often accompany that class of passenger.

I was over in late April (on a non-stop flight from Vancouver) and while my flight was quite full, I found that the Non-EU line was waaaay shorter than for passengers from the UK or EU (i.e. most of the passengers on the flight were returning UK citizens/EU residents). I think that there were MAYBE ten people ahead of me in the queue (I was seated at the back of the plane and had to wait for everyone ahead of me to disembark) and I was through customs faster than my fiancé (who was waiting for me outside of the baggage reclaim area) and I thought it would take.

Even when I arrived on December 27, 2011 the Non-EU line was slightly shorter than the UK/EU lines and I got through customs fairly quickly.

I would imagine that if MrsJoe went in the UK queue and you went through the Non-EU queue, whomever cleared customs first would not be allowed to stand around and wait post-customs for the other to come through and would be herded along to the baggage reclaim area to wait. If there were any problems clearing customs for either of you, it would then be difficult to get word to the other person to apprise them of the situation.

For sentimental reasons as well (if you and MrsJoe are into that sort of thing), it would be meaningful for the both of you to do YOUR first post-spousal visa entry into the UK together in the Non-EU line (I don't know which line you will qualify for in subsequent trips).
You were very lucky for your wait line end of December! I flew in Christmas Eve and was in the Non-EU line for over 2 hours! :( it was ungodly long! The EU line was super short! I can blame christmas but I dread the next flight in if I see the line that long again. hehe. Hopefully my next flight in will be with my Spousal Visa
 

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Hi @Joppa,

What about the fiance visa questions as well ?

is it same like the spouse one ?

what do I need to prepare ?

and also what they ask for ?

Thanks mate :)

Bye
 

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Hi @Joppa,

What about the fiance visa questions as well ?

is it same like the spouse one ?

what do I need to prepare ?

and also what they ask for ?
For fiancé(e), you may be asked or told about:
Your wedding plan (date, venue etc - carry some evidence like booking receipt for reception, wedding invitation).
No work allowed.
Valid 6 months, and when married, must apply for FLR and get biometric resident permit.
Finance (so carry bank statement).

Again it helps if you come in with your UK fiancé(e), or at least they should be waiting for you at the airport with mobile phone.
 

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I was under the impression that if you are traveling together as a couple/family you should always go through immigration together. I've watched a lot of border control shows and have noticed that the immigration officials get suspicious when people from the same travel party go through different immigration lines. That being said, when I entered the UK first on my fiancee visa, my (then) fiance and I went through the EU line together. On our honeymoon, we went through the Mexican border together, and when we returned to the UK this time with my spouse visa, we again went through immigration in the EU line together.

On a side note, we asked the immigration official who hangs around to answer questions which line we should go in and were directed to either, as long as we were together. The non UK citizen should also still fill out the landing card.
 

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On a side note, we asked the immigration official who hangs around to answer questions which line we should go in and were directed to either, as long as we were together. The non UK citizen should also still fill out the landing card.
When we entered the UK for our civil partnership, my (Indonesian) partner joined the non-EEA queue, while I (UK citizen) joined the EEA one, as we had done numerous times previously.

His queue was much shorter and he therefore reached the counter before me. Upon seeing his marriage/CP visa, the UKBA officer asked where I was: my partner pointed me out and the officer signalled to me to come over. She explained that as a couple, we should always queue up together when at the UK border, and that we could join either queue. We have done this on every trip to the UK and in various EU countries since.

teuchter
 

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Would the same rules/suggestions apply for an EEA FP??
1.) If traveling with your spouse on a Family Permit:
* You both can joint either line
* Still have to fill out landing card
* Passport gets stamped

2.) If traveling without your spouse on a Family Permit:
* You have to joint the non-EU line
* Still have to fill out landing card
* Passport gets stamped

3.) If traveling with or without spouse with your RC:
* Either line
* No landing card to fill out
* No stamp on your passport

Been there, done that!:cool:
Animo
(Cheers)
 

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When we entered the UK for our civil partnership, my (Indonesian) partner joined the non-EEA queue, while I (UK citizen) joined the EEA one, as we had done numerous times previously.

His queue was much shorter and he therefore reached the counter before me. Upon seeing his marriage/CP visa, the UKBA officer asked where I was: my partner pointed me out and the officer signalled to me to come over. She explained that as a couple, we should always queue up together when at the UK border, and that we could join either queue. We have done this on every trip to the UK and in various EU countries since.

teuchter
Thanks for saying that, Teuchter... I was wondering about whether or not I could join the UK line in the future when Ed (my UK fiancé) and I travel or would we be relegated to the Non-EU line because I am a Canadian. It's important to us to have this information, as Ed is blind and would be dependent on my status to get through the whole customs process and knowing that we will have a choice of lines will make it that much easier for us to back into the UK (i.e. we will choose the shortest line possible).
 

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WestCoastCanadianGirl said:
Thanks for saying that, Teuchter... I was wondering about whether or not I could join the UK line in the future when Ed (my UK fiancé) and I travel or would we be relegated to the Non-EU line because I am a Canadian. It's important to us to have this information, as Ed is blind and would be dependent on my status to get through the whole customs process and knowing that we will have a choice of lines will make it that much easier for us to back into the UK (i.e. we will choose the shortest line possible).
From our experience (8 entries to the UK over the past 5 years*) the non-EU/EEA queue is always much shorter - although it moves more slowly than the EU/EEA one, there are usually more counters open.

(*6 entries via Glasgow Airport and 1 each via Edinburgh and Manchester Airports.)

teuchter
 

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From our experience (8 entries to the UK over the past 5 years*) the non-EU/EEA queue is always much shorter - although it moves more slowly than the EU/EEA one, there are usually more counters open.

(*6 entries via Glasgow Airport and 1 each via Edinburgh and Manchester Airports.)

teuchter
LOL, every time I come through Edinburgh the non-EU/EEA line is miles long (I exaggerate but only a little) and the EU/EEA is always short and moves like lightning! I must be booking the wrong flights:lol:
 

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AnAmericanInScotland said:
LOL, every time I come through Edinburgh the non-EU/EEA line is miles long (I exaggerate but only a little) and the EU/EEA is always short and moves like lightning! I must be booking the wrong flights:lol:
...or maybe we've just been lucky?!

teuchter
 

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I will soon be returning to the UK on a fiance visa. If what I am reading is correct is sounds like I should have proof of it's validity beyond just the visa itself. Is that correct? Has anyone run into problems with this?
 

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You are recommended to carry some of the documents you've submitted for your application, mainly financial, accommodation and date and place of proposed wedding. You may not be asked about any of this, but just in case.
 
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