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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello. Is it possible to apply for a Fiance Visa if the Fiance has never visited the UK?

We are planning on making an application for Fiance Visa next year and are under the impression that the person applying should have been to the UK previously, prior to applying for a Fiance Visa and are planning on that basis with Visitor Visa application first. This adds time to the whole process with work commitments/ vacation allowance etc between Visitor Visa application and subsequent Fiance Visa application and processing time and we would very much like to bring our plans forward if possible.

We have spent a significant amount of our relationship together outside of the UK.

If someone could advise regarding if it is possible to apply direct for the Fiance Visa (meeting all other requirements - financial, accommodation and relationship) without having had a Visitor Visa first, that would be much appreciated, even if to confirm it is in fact a requirement to have visited first.
 

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This is the first I have heard of this! My daughter in law is applying for a spouse visa and has never been to UK before...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This is the first I have heard of this! My daughter in law is applying for a spouse visa and has never been to UK before...
Hi Hertsfem, don't panic :eek: We're asking because we're not sure ourselves. We have spent so much time reading the UKBA guidelines and trying to determine what does and doesn't apply that we've got to the point of being a bit overwhelmed and just need confirmation of one or the other. We really hope the Fiance does not need to have visited the UK, it would make a huge difference to us.
 

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While that is the case, having visited each other's country and met their family adds to the evidence of a genuine relationship. It may be an idea to just mention why you haven't been able to visit UK in your covering letter, such as pressure of work. In case of an arranged marriage, for example, it's often the case that the non-UK partner hasn't visited UK before, and that is acceptable because of the nature of their relationship.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
While that is the case, having visited each other's country and met their family adds to the evidence of a genuine relationship. It may be an idea to just mention why you haven't been able to visit UK in your covering letter, such as pressure of work. In case of an arranged marriage, for example, it's often the case that the non-UK partner hasn't visited UK before, and that is acceptable because of the nature of their relationship.
Thank you for further information, we are very grateful. We have met each other's family abroad on a number of occasions with photographs and records etc. Arranged marriage doesn't apply to us; work commitment is the reason for not visiting the UK, on both our parts. We have strong evidence for the relationship being genuine and subsisting (because it is!) and have spent a significant amount of time together outside of the UK.

Knowing it is not a requirement will make a big difference to us in finalising our plans and making applications. Better to ask and be sure than make unnecessary applications. Thanks for all responses.
 

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Also having visited UK will give the prospective partner a fair idea of what it is like to settle here. So it isn't just about relationship but having experienced at first hand what living in UK is like. So you also want to bear this point in mind when penning your covering letter. You could say, for example, that while pressure of work has so far prevented me from visiting UK, in meeting my fiancé's family and talking about life in UK, I feel I have a good grasp of what living and settling in UK is about, and feel confident that's what I want to do.
 

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What Joppa has expressed would apply to a married couple, also. He's not saying it's mandatory, but it's always *best* to have been to the others country. At the end of the day, they want to know that the relationship is genuine, and it does help to prove that it is if we've visited the location of our partner. Your daughter will have to show evidence of having met in person prior to the marriage, and show as much evidence as possible, of times spent together, and as Joppa said, an acknowledgement that she has an understanding of life in the UK... She should explain why she hasn't been able to visit her husbands hometown. There's definitely more to proving that a relationship is genuine beyond just showing the marriage license and photos of that day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Also having visited UK will give the prospective partner a fair idea of what it is like to settle here. So it isn't just about relationship but having experienced at first hand what living in UK is like. So you also want to bear this point in mind when penning your covering letter. You could say, for example, that while pressure of work has so far prevented me from visiting UK, in meeting my fiancé's family and talking about life in UK, I feel I have a good grasp of what living and settling in UK is about, and feel confident that's what I want to do.
This is exceptionally valuable advice which we have taken note of and will apply as suggested, thank you. The non-UK national speaks English all day, every day in an English business market, working mainly with UK nationals and maintains and updates their knowledge on life in the UK as best they can through conversations and reading both local and international news sources. They understand a good deal about life in the UK despite not yet having visited and continue their education in how UK politics/ education/ culture systems work through all available means.

We were originally planning to apply for a Visitor Visa first as we thought it was a requirement to have visited and of course would have done it that way if we had to/ it would be at all detrimental to the Fiance Visa application; with our respective work commitments it will be an amazing relief to be able to make a Fiance Visa application without having a Visitor Visa application first and will shorten our timeline by almost a full year.

Thank you.
 

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What Joppa has expressed would apply to a married couple, also. He's not saying it's mandatory, but it's always *best* to have been to the others country. At the end of the day, they want to know that the relationship is genuine, and it does help to prove that it is if we've visited the location of our partner. Your daughter will have to show evidence of having met in person prior to the marriage, and show as much evidence as possible, of times spent together, and as Joppa said, an acknowledgement that she has an understanding of life in the UK... She should explain why she hasn't been able to visit her husbands hometown. There's definitely more to proving that a relationship is genuine beyond just showing the marriage license and photos of that day.

Thankyou for your reply, however in this instance my son only went back to UK in May so this surely cannot apply. He is going to see his family in January so shall be keeping all the documents regarding his trip. Each case seems to be unique which is what makes this forum so great :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
After much discussion and re-reading posts on this forum, my fiance and I have decided to revert back to our original timeline of Visitor Visa followed by Fiance Visa and switch to Spouse Visa thereafter if all goes to plan. As I have said in other posts, we want to do things right and hopefully only have to apply for each visa once, even if it means having to wait for quite a bit longer to have our happy ending.

The advice and observation of other posters (on other threads as well) regarding the potential positive impact of having visited the UK prior to Fiance Visa application is too strong a consideration for us to ignore for our own situation.

Having read some refusal accounts for Visitor Visa with a view to further Fiance/ Spouse visa applications on the grounds that the "balance of probabilities" indicated the visitor would not return to their country of residence, I have some questions please. I have asked about sponsoring non-EU friends previously and all seems fine for their visits that are straightforward and non-relationship-related, however with future Fiance/ Spouse applications involved, it's best to be sure on the finer points.

What is the best way to approach the reason for visit question on the application form? Honesty is the best policy of course, but what wording is best; does the non-EU national state they are visiting with a view to making a further application for Fiance Visa at a later date? All current requirements for Fiance Visa are met, however the non-EU national is yet to visit the UK and we feel it is the best way for us to do a Visitor Visa first to strengthen the Fiance Visa application.

The UKBA website requires 6 months of payslips and bank statements from the UK resident for sponsoring a Visitor Visa, this is no problem to provide and everything is in order; will a P60 also be required?

Is a property inspection report required for a Visitor Visa or simply a utility bill as proof of address? Is it better to simply book a hotel for the duration of the visit?

Regarding proof of return to country of residence, which I know is key, there will be from the non-EU applicant (all in English/ officially translated): work contract, letter from employer confirming job role, vacation dates and date of return, 6 months of payslips and bank statements (or are the payslips and bank statements too much along with the UK sponsor's documents? The UKBA site says include them but is that for self-sponsored visitors?), a lease/ rental agreement for accommodation and a statement confirming strong familial and social ties to the country of residence.

The strong ties are true, however the stronger tie is to the relationship and we are concerned that this will have a detrimental affect on a Visitor Visa application on the "balance of probabilities" aspect, especially if declaring intention for future application, particularly with current immigration dicussion/ debate, although it will be a few months yet before making the application because of work commitments from both parties.

Any experience/ advice on any aspect of this would be much appreciated.
 
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