Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner
1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was born in the UK to a French mother and a father who is a British citizen, they were married in Paris. My birth was registered at the French Consulate in London. My mother returned to France without me when I was very young, around 3-4 years old. She has remained in France ever since, she has never lost her French nationality. I only recently found out that I was registered at the French Consulate and potentially I could apply for the CNF.

I have read the application instructions and a passport is required to be sent as supporting document. Since the application can take 36 months, what happens with the passport? I don't want to send it if I don't know what would happen to it.

Is it worth using the services of an avocat in Paris to manage the application, one that specialises in CNF applications?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I'm by no means an expert in this, but I think that if you were properly registered at the French consulate you don't need a CNF. That registration will have produced a French birth certificate and you should be able to apply for a copy of that here (Section 2: Si vous êtes né à l'étranger):

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
I'm by no means an expert in this, but I think that if you were properly registered at the French consulate you don't need a CNF. That registration will have produced a French birth certificate and you should be able to apply for a copy of that here (Section 2: Si vous êtes né à l'étranger):

I read it that the OP already had a French passport but would like the CNF (useful to pass on nationality to the next generation or to apply for nationality for a partner)
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
51,534 Posts
Before the OP applies for a CNF, they should simply try requesting their French birth certificate first. All French birth certificates for those born overseas are kept in Nantes. Details are here: Acte de naissance : demande de copie intégrale ou d'extrait

If you can get your French birth certificate, you may very well not need the CNF, but you should look into getting a carte nationale d'identité. (And from that, a French passport.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,550 Posts
Hi, are you applying for a CNF because you wish to obtain French nationality?
It's far longer - and apparently more difficult - to file your demand outside France.

F-B Brit wrote: "I read it that the OP already had a French passport but would like the CNF ..."
I re read through the OP's post and she/he doesn't specify that the passport is a French one.

Go to: Certificat de nationalité française (CNF)
The guide to applying for a CNF (and the documents required) depends on your situation - multi-choice questions.

Given that all French documents are relatively easy to obtain but only have a validity of 3 months for administratif demands,
I'd recommend getting all the non-French stuff dealt with first - your own passport, your father's birth certif and proof of residency.
These will have to be translated into French by a translator recognised by the French consulate and are valid indefinitely.

There have been other posts concerning CNF on the forum -
one concerning a demand for grand-parents birth and marriage certifs on the non-French parent's side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Apologies for the confusion I caused. The passport referred to is my British one. I believe they need a copy of a document such as a passport or drivers licence which are both British to support an application for the CNF. I believe I need the CNF and once I have that, I can apply for a French passport if I so wish.

I have a recent copy of my French birth certificate, it looks like a straight a translation of the British one along with a separate clause at the bottom stating my mothers French nationality. It has a number and it says it is a transcription of the Acte de Naissance. Is that the same thing as a birth certificate? The French Consulate in London told me I was registered there and I have subsequently ordered and received copies from Nantes.

I have my parents French marriage certificate from Paris and my mothers French birth certificate, also from Paris. I have a certified copy of my British birth certificate duly translated by an approved translator. The French Consulate in London stated I need the CNF in order to update the civil register with things like marriage. I've read the requirements on the Service Public website on what documentation is needed for people born abroad who have 1 French parent.

Indeed passing on nationality is one of the key reasons I would like to pursue this. I can use the services of an avocat in Paris to help me with the CNF, they have told me it can take up to 3 years.

I will definitely check whether I was properly registered at the French Consulate and whether there is CNF already before doing anything else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
711 Posts
After spending many months getting all the stuff sorted out for my husbands failed CNF bid I think I can farily confidently tell you you shouldn't need a CNF as you have the birth cert. The CNF from my understanding is for those that don't have a French BC. You should be able to just apply for a Carte d'Identitie / passport from what you have meaning you don't need the CNF.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
After spending many months getting all the stuff sorted out for my husbands failed CNF bid I think I can farily confidently tell you you shouldn't need a CNF as you have the birth cert. The CNF from my understanding is for those that don't have a French BC. You should be able to just apply for a Carte d'Identitie / passport from what you have meaning you don't need the CNF.
Thank you very much
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hi, are you applying for a CNF because you wish to obtain French nationality?
It's far longer - and apparently more difficult - to file your demand outside France.

F-B Brit wrote: "I read it that the OP already had a French passport but would like the CNF ..."
I re read through the OP's post and she/he doesn't specify that the passport is a French one.

Go to: Certificat de nationalité française (CNF)
The guide to applying for a CNF (and the documents required) depends on your situation - multi-choice questions.

Given that all French documents are relatively easy to obtain but only have a validity of 3 months for administratif demands,
I'd recommend getting all the non-French stuff dealt with first - your own passport, your father's birth certif and proof of residency.
These will have to be translated into French by a translator recognised by the French consulate and are valid indefinitely.

There have been other posts concerning CNF on the forum -
one concerning a demand for grand-parents birth and marriage certifs on the non-French parent's side.
Thank you for your reply. I saw the post about getting grandparents birth and marriage certificates so I'm working on getting those.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Before the OP applies for a CNF, they should simply try requesting their French birth certificate first. All French birth certificates for those born overseas are kept in Nantes. Details are here: Acte de naissance : demande de copie intégrale ou d'extrait

If you can get your French birth certificate, you may very well not need the CNF, but you should look into getting a carte nationale d'identité. (And from that, a French passport.)
I will try that. Thank you for your reply
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'm by no means an expert in this, but I think that if you were properly registered at the French consulate you don't need a CNF. That registration will have produced a French birth certificate and you should be able to apply for a copy of that here (Section 2: Si vous êtes né à l'étranger):

Thank you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Update to my French passport application. This was refused because they need the CNF. Being registered at the Consulate at birth where my mothers nationality was listed as French, being born to a French parent in the UK, having a French BC filed in Nantes is not enough, it does not automatically give me French nationality sadly. They quote article 5/decree 2005-1726 under the section for passports. The Consulate had previously told me I can apply for a passport.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
51,534 Posts
See my reply to you in the other thread. Basically, you can apply for a CNF and then go from there. And, you can do that by postal mail.

Hate to have to tell you, but you can't always trust what the Consulate tells you in these matters. (I spent 20 months as a sans papiers here because I followed the advice of the French Consulate in Germany. I should have listened to what the door guard tried to tell me.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thank you for your replies Oh yes I well believe that. I've had dealings with many a consulate in my working life. I called the French Consulate and they said nothing was wrong, it was just a delay as they had to make extra checks for a first time passport application. Then later the same day they replied to my email which I had sent a while back stating a letter was on its way which I knew would not be good news. I have read about others in exactly the same situation as me, born in the UK, one French parent, registered correctly and have got their French passports without the CNF. I thought it was pretty clear what nationalities I have. The issue with the CNF is the time it takes from abroad, up to 3 years. And the amount of paperwork they want on my father and paternal grandparents/great grandparents who are not French, this could be an issue to obtain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,127 Posts
They don't necessarily need multiple generations for your non-French parent, they just prefer it for their records.

As for requiring you to obtain a CNF while others haven't had to, every case is different, or rather it is in the eyes of France.

That said, I feel your pain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Yes it is a bit odd that I need a CNF. Everywhere I read that a child with one or more French parents is French, except for me it seems.

The Consulate has quoted decree 2005-1726 article 5, so I gather from that that because my French BC does not have marginal information specifically mentioning that I have French nationality, I have to apply for the CNF. It is the only reason I can find. I've not seen another persons UK BC transcribed into the French register so I do not know what a "properly registered" birth looks like. It does not look like a normal French BC of a person born in France. It is a translation of the British one with extra information about my mothers nationality.

I will ask them which clause in the decree applies to me so I understand what is lacking from my French BC. I don't mind applying for the CNF, it's just the amount of time it will take to get a reply which might still not give me French nationality.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,127 Posts
It should indeed be what they say it should be. I have no idea why your birth certificate from Nantes is not like that.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
51,534 Posts
I will ask them which clause in the decree applies to me so I understand what is lacking from my French BC.
I would be very careful with that approach. What I suspect is the real "issue" here is that you never did anything to "recognize" your French nationality until reasonably well after you became an adult. The fact that you are duly registered in Nantes means that you are a French citizen, but before they issue the paperwork to you they do need to prove that you are who you say you are and that neither you nor your parents have in any way changed your situation.

Just for an example, when I took French nationality by marriage, they kept asking for further information about my French husband, claiming that they had to be sure that he had not given up his French citizenship during the time he was married to his first wife, or in the years since his divorce. How or why he would have done that is still a mystery to both of us, but that's what they wanted.

Still, with a French BC registered in Nantes, there is a good possibility that your process should go somewhat more quickly than for a person with French parents but no BC in Nantes. Think of it this way, it used to be a requirement that you had to have a national identity card in order to get a passport. That requirement was dropped, but now they seem to be sticklers for other proofs of nationality before they'll consider giving you a passport if you haven't been keeping up on your registration.
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top