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There does come a point where the advantages and disadvantages of tourism don't balance. I can understand why locals in Barcelona and Magaluf are pissed off.

A couple of months ago we had dinner in Estepona with some Belgian friends who are new to the area. After our dinner we took a leisurely stroll through the old town, which is truly beautiful especially at night. I suppose it was just after midnight, we were chatting, apart from our voices no sound and I thought it must be hell for residents here in the summer with people wandering around noisily until the early hours. I remember once in Boulogne with a group of colleagues we rolled home somewhat boisterously from a good dinner and had a bucket of some liquid or other chucked over us from an upstairs window.
Estepona has seen a marked increase in tourism in the past five years which is good as it's family tourism and the town hasn't much else to live from. But rents and house prices have soared and in the future it's going to be hard for young Esteponeros to find somewhere affordable to live.
The town is becoming an all-year-round resort which is good for employment but even so come October and the unemployment figures will rise again.
I must say I dread the summer months which is a cheek, I suppose, as I'm a residential tourist, sort of, albeit of nine years standing. But I long for autumn when I can find a place to park, don't have to stand in queues at the checkout while British visitors laboriously count out euros and cents to the cashier and I can go to our local restaurant without having my dinner spoiled by badly behaved uncontrolled kids(usually British).
But then I'm a miserable sod at the best of times..
 

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Saw a photo of gondolas in Venice this week, no water visible and tourist packed shoulder to shoulder with the neighbouring craft. Totally lacking in atmosphere, looked like a fairground ride. Glad I went years ago on a misty March morning. I don't think tourists are necessarily bad behaved just that they have different priorities than residents. I would never go on holiday in August but sadly some don't have any choice. Living in London for years I suppose I got more tolerant of visitors.
 

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I sure it's all very much a case of NIMBYism of which we are all guilty, everybody agrees tourism is a good thing but not if I can't park my car!

We have tourism here in Extremadura, I live in what is known as the "golden triangle " we have Merida, Cáceres and Trujillo all ancients towns two of which are world heritage sites, no more than 45 minutes away, then there is Guadalupe another world heritage site (yet still to be visited) an hour away. Our local village is known for its famous Ibierican Jamón and cathedrals of Jamón. Visitors here tend to be of the cultural types rather than the beer and vodka tonic kind, however they can still be rude to locals and abrasive, many are Spanish, French and Dutch a few Brits. My local village is trying to increase tourism and rather than sell the world heritage sites and the Famous Jamons, we are going for "sporting" tourism so we have had mountain bike tracks and competitions, midnight mountain marathons! A local paragliding club is slowly starting, another village near us is very Muslims ch a " horsey" village, and is heading in that direction. When I was talking to the mayor about all of this, she was saying that they want to do this very very slowly, over a period of many years as does the Junta here. They cite Andalucía and the costas as the way not to go, they want gradual infrastructure to be put in, they don't want the drinkers they want the " proper" spenders, not people who spend all their money in Dave's seaside bar or Berts fish and chips. They want it to be the best known secret

Long ramble, point being, just like the anti foreigner sentimentality post B in the U.K. a few people ranting does not a Summer make. It was bound to happen as Mary said for all sorts of reasons, but here tourists are welcomed and actively being recruited, as long as they don't take all the parking spaces at the market on Saturday mornings. and as any sensible local will tell you far better to go to the tourist places out of season
 

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Also check out the Airbnb protests in Barcelona and the effects of changes in technology and other Silicon Valley innovations, that are changing the world today in the BBC documentary - The Secrets of Silicon Valley.

First shown on Sunday - there's a repeat tonight on BBC2 at 11:15 BST or see it again on
BBC I-Player below:

BBC - The Secrets of Silicon Valley episode one
 

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Where there are a lot of tourists from one country their bars set up. On the CDS there are a few Dutch bars, German bakeries etc. Travel around Cadiz province and you can find quieter places Only saw one Brit themed bar in Sorrento. A couple of chiringuito owners I know complain about Madrilenos, say they are too demanding. Old money from Madrid always went to Northern Spain away from intense heat.

Some suggestions here for quieter holidays in Spain includes Extremadura.

20 places in Spain you never thought to visit (but really should)
 

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Arran are a pro-Catalan independence, anti-capitalist group of self-proclaimed anarchists who have opted to use violence to promote their cause, thus losing the support of the vast majority of locals many of whose livelihoods depend on tourism.

A far more effective way to deal with the problems caused by excessive numbers of tourists (I can't say mass tourism or Mary will be on my back) is by regulation, e.g. restricting the supply of accommodation. Mallorca and Barcelona ar already clamping down on Airbnb, and Ibiza are banning the use of public beaches for DJ clubs.

https://www.theguardian.com/technol...own-on-illegal-apartment-rentals-in-barcelona

https://www.thelocal.es/20170330/palma-de-mallorca-wants-to-ban-tourist-apartment-summer-rentals

Ibiza authorities ban DJs from beach clubs to reclaim beaches from dance music - News - Mixmag
 

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Where there are a lot of tourists from one country their bars set up. On the CDS there are a few Dutch bars, German bakeries etc. Travel around Cadiz province and you can find quieter places Only saw one Brit themed bar in Sorrento. A couple of chiringuito owners I know complain about Madrilenos, say they are too demanding. Old money from Madrid always went to Northern Spain away from intense heat.

Some suggestions here for quieter holidays in Spain includes Extremadura.

20 places in Spain you never thought to visit (but really should)
Well that will ruin those places then. T/G they haven't publicised our hideouts.
 

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It's all lies Extremadura is an awful place... don't come 😂😂😂😂
 

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Well that will ruin those places then. T/G they haven't publicised our hideouts.
I didn't realise you were the Lord of your local manor, Baldi...:)

'Ruin' is in the eye of the beholder. You are a Brit in your town just as I and the rest of us are. Just because we live here doesn't give us rights of exclusive ownership or confer some special status, does it...
It may well be that there are a few miserable old gits in your town who wish you and other guiris hadn't come to 'ruin' their Spanish hideaway. Others with an eye to the money they could make from us may well wish there were more foreigners around.

As I said, there has to be a balance. As Alca said, regulation as proposed in Barcelona is the way to go. A curb on new hotels where there is already adequate capacity and a crack down on illegal holiday lets.

Yes, I dislike the word 'mass' being applied to anything as for too many people the word 'mass' means everybody but me (I know Alca doesn't mean it in that way). Like the old tourist/traveller distinction.

Some time ago The Guardian did a feature on hidden gems in Europe, those quaint little villages and beaches as yet 'undiscovered' - bet that's news to the folk in the next village.;) I had a twinge of sympathy for the inevitable surge (mass?) of middle class discerning travellers about to descend on these poor innocent folk, all so keen to enjoy those tomatoes with a taste only found in those grown in Spain, to the local wine you could never find in Waitrose (probably a good reason for that) and those authentic regional dishes usually consumed in pricey eateries where locals couldn't afford a plate of said tomatoes.

So to sum up: yes, the number of visitors, whether the more discerning or the vulgar beer swilling sort , need to be regulated. I think if Brexit actually occurs Brits will regulate themselves anyway, having to cope with the fall in sterling and the queues to go through non-EU immigration.
The next wave, already growing in size, will be Scandinavians and Finns. We are noticing that at the perrera.

Me, I hate the bloody summer months. As I said, takes ages to find a parking space, these damned tourists block the aisles in the local supermarket, some of their kids should be on leads....but that's me and I know in my better moments that it's a rather selfish mean-spirited attitude. After all, I live in Spain, I didn't buy the place.
And those tourists/travellers will be gone in a week or two and I'm here for the duration....
 

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It's difficult if not impossible to distinguish what are the true feelings of the majority of local residents. These anarchist groups are often composed of middle class people telling ordinary folk what's good for them.
This is a very complex issue throwing up all sorts of conflicting views. I read a Guardian comment which referred to 'nauseating groups of cruise ship passengers descending on places like Venice'.
Since many of these 'nauseating' people may well be newly-wealthy Asians or Africans, I'm sure right-on Guardianistas will be making accusations of racism...To me, it stinks of elitism.
One thing is for sure: effective action can be taken only be local, regional and national authorities.
Monitoring new hotel developments, enforcing the existing licensing laws for holiday lets, proactive policing of busy tourist areas, enforcing of local by-laws regulating clothing away from the beach and behaviour in general will all eventually have a calming effect.
I don't go along with this 'I found this lovely unspoilt spot and I want to keep it for myself' mentality. I spent a lot of time in Prague and Krakow in the 1970s under socialist rule and loved both those cities then...no advertising, no western consumerism, lovely old (crumbling) buildings, everyone dressed in the same poor quality clothing, hardly any tourists...Now these cities are like most other western European cities, touristy, crowded, stag and hen party destinations. Not to my taste any more.
But then I can't expect the residents of Prague and Krakow to live in a museum to suit me. I'd say from my experience that the majority are happy wit the changes, happy to be part of the mainstream.
Spain isn't a museum either. Recently the Management Board decided to modernise our Flamenco Club. Before it was low-ceilinged, stuffy, dimly lit, tiled walls and floors but now the ceiling has been raised, the tiles and pillars removed, air-con installed and laminated wood-effect flooring laid. Brits prefer it as it was, the Spaniards are proud of their 'modern' club, fit for the twenty-first century, as the President said in his speech at the opening.

Spain like other countries moves with the times, even if some of us -and yes, I would include myself) often wish it wouldn't. But we didn't buy it to pickle it when we came here and indeed we have no right to want to. My area lives off tourism, thankfully the quiet sort (at the moment) but tourism nevertheless. And yes, it's still the 'real' Spain.

And we often forget that consumerism isn't caused solely by the capitalist greed of big business. Social democratic government policy and trades union pressure have combined to put more money in working people's pockets so they can enjoy what used to be the privilege of the wealthy.
I'm all for that even if it gets up the noses of the elitists.:cool:
 

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Madrid is now taking action to reduce the adverse effects of turistifcaci¡on .

Basically the problem is that in certain districts, too many people are letting out their flats to tourists on Airbnb. This makes it unbearable for the remaining residents, and is pushing up the price of accommodation beyond the reach of local people. It's also p1ssing off legitimate hotel and hostal owners who have to go to the trouble of getting licences etc.

So Madrid are taking measures to spread the distribution of tourists throughout the city, reducing pressure on the central district (e.g. by placing noise restrictions on popular open-air spaces) and redistributing the economic benefits to other areas.

https://www.elconfidencial.com/espa...ena-turismo-pisos-turisiticos-centro_1426347/
 

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Not that difficult actually.

Desahuciados por la turistificación: “Me tiran de casa para alquilarla en Airbnb”

(Evicted through mass tourism - I was thrown out of my house so they could let it on Airbnb)
But disgusting though that is, those unfortunate people aren't a majority, are they....

I'm guessing a few are very anti, like the people evicted, a few are quite happy to make money renting their apartments or spare rooms (maybe some are obliged to to make ends meet) and the rest don't care one way or another.

Isn't that usually the case, though...
 
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