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WoW!
I guess in Thailand you should never say anything bad about the king and in the Philippines you should not say such racist remarks, or write them on FB pages or in Forums....such as this one.
hmmm.....shhhhhh

Not that it changes anything about other countries, but I wonder if a person can get themselves kicked out of a "western country" or imprisoned for something they say or write in FB.

It is always wise to know the local laws and be careful with one's comments.
In Tibet, I had to have an official guide assigned and he made it clear that one should be very cautious about what one spoke about in Tibet, especially a guest in the country.
 

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WoW!
I guess in Thailand you should never say anything bad about the king and in the Philippines you should not say such racist remarks, or write them on FB pages or in Forums....such as this one.
hmmm.....shhhhhh.
I do agree with the Thai Rules ... but, if Singapore alone deports Filipinos who curse their hosts and call the hosts lazy etc etc - some of the comments are made by Maids working in Singapore - the flights will be full of deportees

I solidly believe there are close to 10,000 Filipinos working in Thailand, as I have read some of their group info online

Vs, may be a hand full of Thais in Philippines...
 

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Intent is what counts

As one who has been an expat in three countries so far (and about to move to the Philippines for retirement) I can say that there are occasions when you can accidentally upset locals because of something you don't know.

In Ukraine you can upset somebody by shaking their hand through a doorway! Apparently so through many Slavic countries. Or giving flowers of an even number... A dozen roses for your true love? She'd be devastated! Even number are ONLY for funerals... for living people it must be an odd number of flowers.

A friend once pointed out that we can disagree as much as we like with laws and governments - AS LONG AS WE OBEY THE LAWS WE DISAGREE WITH. We can strive to change those laws, we can lobby, support opposition politicians etc. but we must, in the meantime, obey those laws.

And as I've seen on here - most of us have issues with things in our own country too - nowhere is truly perfect!
 

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Personality Disorder

As one who has been an expat in three countries so far (and about to move to the Philippines for retirement) I can say that there are occasions when you can accidentally upset locals because of something you don't know.

In Ukraine you can upset somebody by shaking their hand through a doorway! Apparently so through many Slavic countries. Or giving flowers of an even number... A dozen roses for your true love? She'd be devastated! Even number are ONLY for funerals... for living people it must be an odd number of flowers.

A friend once pointed out that we can disagree as much as we like with laws and governments - AS LONG AS WE OBEY THE LAWS WE DISAGREE WITH. We can strive to change those laws, we can lobby, support opposition politicians etc. but we must, in the meantime, obey those laws.

And as I've seen on here - most of us have issues with things in our own country too - nowhere is truly perfect!
Abide by the laws but you do get tired of being a subject of ridicule, jokes and deception, (there's no changing laws here).

After living in the Philippines for several years you do begin to pick up the fowl talk that's happening around you and it's geared towards you but nobody's looking at you, it's a game of cat and mouse with words and it happens frequently when I'm out and about, main reason is that I live in an area where there aren't many foreigners, as far as I can tell I'm the only expat living in our municipality the others come and go as tourists or they're trying to figure out how to stay here permanent.

Normally I let it roll of my shoulders or let it out the other ear but this time I was with my 4 year old grandson and got picked on first by kids wanting money, I tried to be nice but the kids were relentless so I handed out some bad words, turns out the kids are in-laws with the store clerk, he allowed them to get ice out of the machine and then as I'm standing there trying to pay my internet bill (7-Eleven) 3 young women walk in and I heard them refer to me as a "Humbug" or it might be spelled Hombog...either way it's a disparaging word, I addressed that right away, they didn't buy anything just come in for some sort of attention.

Bottom line is that the store clerk with no manager around, couldn't get his online pay to work, I mistakenly told him I'd try the other 7-Eleven not to far away, turns out that's his buddies they wouldn't even look at me while I was at the counter, the manager was there and he seen what was going on and began to walk towards them, all of a sudden and in an instant they were ready to help me.

If you strike back you might as well go some where else real quick becaue it's a one way street and nobody cares about the foreigner you'll always be looked upon as the grumpy mean guy, cheap skate, your supposed to keep taking those punches and smile, occasionally I'll bare my teeth. :boxing:
 

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You've got to be kidding! I just spent a long time writing a nice reply, and had to sign in again... all my typing is lost.

Just the gist this time, because I'm not wasting another hour typing only to maybe lose it again!

Hi McAlleyboy,

Yes, I understand how it feels. I spent 7 years in Ukraine, a year in China and now 18 months in India. I worked out different strategies for each, but all involved learning a couple of phrases I could speak almost flawlessly - practice them a lot!

If they think you can speak the local language, they'll be more careful - and usually more respectful too.
 

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Tagalog

You've got to be kidding! I just spent a long time writing a nice reply, and had to sign in again... all my typing is lost.

Just the gist this time, because I'm not wasting another hour typing only to maybe lose it again!

Hi McAlleyboy,

Yes, I understand how it feels. I spent 7 years in Ukraine, a year in China and now 18 months in India. I worked out different strategies for each, but all involved learning a couple of phrases I could speak almost flawlessly - practice them a lot!

If they think you can speak the local language, they'll be more careful - and usually more respectful too.
Good point, sorry to hear you lost all you had typed, "Been there done that". :(

The bad talk happened to me all in a span of 30 minutes and I had no time to react or they were talking behind me, that's how they do it here, it's always indirectly pointed at you. But I did answer in Tagalog, so I got some blankless looks and hiding.

It sounds like you've had your share of similar experiences, I need to learn some more basic words or work on them, I do have a Rosetta Stone Tagalog language pack, it's difficult though I share my computer with my wife (loves online games) and my son playing games, I should have bought a PlayStation or need to repair my Laptop.

Note: When you initially log in click the tiny box that reads always logged in. On many of my posts as I hit the Submit Reply button it comes up blank but you haven't lost anything, all you do is hit the back button and everything you typed will should show up and you can just hit the Submit button again.
 

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I think that most of us living here have to some degree or another been subject to these kinds of treatment. There are times that I have the feeling, even though I can't understand the words, that I am being treated as the "Village Idiot". Just seems that some have the feeling of being superior to any Foreigner. What irks me to no end is when paying for something, the clerk will always give the change to my Wife, even as they have seen me take it from my billfold to pay, and she will pick it up & hand it to me. This happens even in some of the eatery's that we frequent quite often and the clerk clearly remembers us.

Fred
 

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I just re-read what I posted earlier. When I re-typed it in a shorter form (and in a hurry) I can see that I've been unclear.

When I said that locals are more respectful when they hear you use their own language, I didn't mean because they're afraid you'll understand... which is how it seems when I re-read it.

I meant that local people appreciate the effort foreigners must make to learn their language, and in Ukraine, China and India that's certainly the case. I already know a few Tagalog and Visayan words. My step-mother is from Pangasinan and one of my army buddies I met when I was 17 married a lady from northern Leyte. I also know a lot of Filipino dishes, and love almost all of them! (Haven't tried 'balot' yet - not sure if I will... but then, two months ago I didn't think I'd ever try eating goat's testes... and they're delicious!!!)

Even on holidays in Turkey, Poland and Thailand I always learned the basics - 'please', 'thank you' and 'hello' or 'how are you?'. The locals really did appreciate it. When they laughed at my mispronunciation, they were laughing with me, rather than at me.
 
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