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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yiasou,

I would be interested to find out what the expat community consider is a suitable annual income to live comfortably in Cyprus. I do realise some will have mortgages and rents to pay and others will not, but if we leave out those figures how much do you need as income to live comfortably? Run a car, eat out now and again, etc.

Efkaristo poli, in advance.

Paul
 

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Yiasou,

I would be interested to find out what the expat community consider is a suitable annual income to live comfortably in Cyprus. I do realise some will have mortgages and rents to pay and others will not, but if we leave out those figures how much do you need as income to live comfortably? Run a car, eat out now and again, etc.

Efkaristo poli, in advance.

Paul
This is an almost impossible question to answer as individual tastes and circumstances would mean that we all have very different views as to what 'living comfortably' means. The same concept of acceptable living conditions is also culturally determined in part - the sad truth is that there are thousands (125, 000) at the last count of foreign workers in Cyprus who have come from backgrounds so underprivaledged by average expat standards that they are more than happy with a solid roof over their heads and enough money to scrape together a meal every day - Cyprus has the fourth largest population in the EU of immigrant workers - many of whom will work for a few hundred euros a month plus accommodation and meals - this has inevitably driven down the average salary which is much lower than the average ex-pat expectation.

To give some idea, we could list a few essentials based on my expected lifestyle:
decent bottle of whisky 55Euros, tank of petrol 45, decent meal for two plus drinks 150euros, half-decent meal for two 45euros. Theatre tickets for two 30Euros, average weekly shopping bill for four (two adults and two babies) 300Euros.

I'd say you'd need to be pulling in at least 1000 Euros to live comfortably [by my definition](and so would your partner). Of course when you take into consideration other aspects such as heating, water, utility bills, rent/mortgage, the need for more cash increases. This makes it virtually impossible for many young families to survive here outside of the famous Cypriot family support network - many people have more than one job to make ends meet.

Hope this helps...
 

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"To give some idea, we could list a few essentials based on my expected lifestyle:
decent bottle of whisky 55Euros, tank of petrol 45, decent meal for two plus drinks 150euros, half-decent meal for two 45euros. Theatre tickets for two 30Euros, average weekly shopping bill for four (two adults and two babies) 300Euros. " Quote




If a decent meal for 2 is the equivalent of £ 135 and a bottle of scotch is £50, I will have to rethink moving to Cyprus as this is very expensive!!!!
 

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"To give some idea, we could list a few essentials based on my expected lifestyle:
decent bottle of whisky 55Euros, tank of petrol 45, decent meal for two plus drinks 150euros, half-decent meal for two 45euros. Theatre tickets for two 30Euros, average weekly shopping bill for four (two adults and two babies) 300Euros. " Quote




If a decent meal for 2 is the equivalent of £ 135 and a bottle of scotch is £50, I will have to rethink moving to Cyprus as this is very expensive!!!!
My god if prices were that bad we would never go out or drink anything other than water.
I think Kimonas must eat in the restaurants that serve the food on gold plates.
We can get a very nice meal for two for around 60 euros and this includes a bottle of wine. The whisky Kimonas drinks must also come in gold plated bottles.:rolleyes::rolleyes:
 

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My god if prices were that bad we would never go out or drink anything other than water.
I think Kimonas must eat in the restaurants that serve the food on gold plates.
We can get a very nice meal for two for around 60 euros and this includes a bottle of wine. The whisky Kimonas drinks must also come in gold plated bottles.:rolleyes::rolleyes:
I did try the Limassol 'whisky' at about 4 euros a bottle, but it is little more than industrial alcohol with a bit or caramel flavouring in it and positively dangerous. Of course you can by blended Scotch at about 12Euros a bottle, but a half decent single malt will set you back 50euros (about twice as much as UK prices). A decent restaurant in Nicosia (with properly trained chefs, toilets, fresh produce etc). will set you back a fair bit, just as it would in the UK, and a decent taverna meal of souvlaki etc will be a lot less (c45 euros). One of my favourite eateries in Nicosia is a pork steak place on a side street in Engomi where the patron selects a steak from a plastic bin based on the size of your feet. He then char grills it over hot coals and serves it up with fresh chips and a cold Keo. There are no toilets but gents are invited to use the wall and trough near the garage across the way. You can get a decent meal there for about 10Euros (including beer), but of course it will fall victim to health and safety eventually. When I have guests over though, I prefer something a little up market, which was the point of my original post, we all have our own definitions of what 'comfortable' is.:)
 

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Quote ' A decent restaurant in Nicosia (with properly trained chefs, toilets, fresh produce etc). "

Funny thing is, all restaurants in Paphos have toilets, even the more seedy establishments:)

From what you say Kimonas, it seems to me that Nicosia is expensive in comparrison with Paphos.
 

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Quote ' A decent restaurant in Nicosia (with properly trained chefs, toilets, fresh produce etc). "

Funny thing is, all restaurants in Paphos have toilets, even the more seedy establishments:)

From what you say Kimonas, it seems to me that Nicosia is expensive in comparrison with Paphos.
We have several friends and family who live in Paphos and although we haven't stayed there long enough to get a feel for household bills etc. it probably works out at about the same. I think Nicosia has an entirely different character and a wider spectrum of neighborhoods from the swanky 'embassy districts' with its very expensive hotels and restuarants, to the immigrant quater of the old city where parts still resemble a shanty town (although there has been a lot of renovations and even the cheap accomodation has been given a face lift). But it is there that you'll find unliscenced bars and restuarants that are extremely cheap (but may not have toilets!) Somewhere in the middle are the decent and fairly priced places. But I would still caution that it is difficult for a younger family to make ends meet - even if they do stick to the average priced places and are careful, the weight of utility bills, education fees, babysitting services, health care, petrol, food, unexpected 'red-tape' fees and fines, telephone and TV, transport to keep in touch with Blighty is sometimes too much when the average salary will barely cover the rent/mortgage and the weekly shopping.

Of course it is still possible to make a decent go of it if you have some support network, two half decent jobs, or private income from rents etc., but I wouldn't want to give the false impression that Cyprus is way cheaper than living in the UK - the generally lower salaries even things up considerably no matter which part of the island you decide to settle in (although what has been stated in previous posts that Nicosia and Limassol work out more expensive on rents is the case)...
 

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We have several friends and family who live in Paphos and although we haven't stayed there long enough to get a feel for household bills etc. it probably works out at about the same. I think Nicosia has an entirely different character and a wider spectrum of neighborhoods from the swanky 'embassy districts' with its very expensive hotels and restuarants, to the immigrant quater of the old city where parts still resemble a shanty town (although there has been a lot of renovations and even the cheap accomodation has been given a face lift). But it is there that you'll find unliscenced bars and restuarants that are extremely cheap (but may not have toilets!) Somewhere in the middle are the decent and fairly priced places. But I would still caution that it is difficult for a younger family to make ends meet - even if they do stick to the average priced places and are careful, the weight of utility bills, education fees, babysitting services, health care, petrol, food, unexpected 'red-tape' fees and fines, telephone and TV, transport to keep in touch with Blighty is sometimes too much when the average salary will barely cover the rent/mortgage and the weekly shopping.

Of course it is still possible to make a decent go of it if you have some support network, two half decent jobs, or private income from rents etc., but I wouldn't want to give the false impression that Cyprus is way cheaper than living in the UK - the generally lower salaries even things up considerably no matter which part of the island you decide to settle in (although what has been stated in previous posts that Nicosia and Limassol work out more expensive on rents is the case)...
I agree wholeheartedlywith you Kimonas.
I am constantly telling people with children that this is not the place for them unless they have very well paid jobs. We hear of far too many young families getting into financial difficulties because they have failed to take into account the cost of schooling and child care etc.
Its ok to take a risk when you don't have children to consider andthe extra cost of their needs but anyone with young children needs to be very sure they are doing the rightthing.
For a couple with no children and at least one of them with a reasonable income the cost of living is fairly much on a par with the UK. While some things may be more expensive, others are cheaper and in the long run it averages out.
The long and the short of it, if you can manage to live on your income in the UK you can manage on the same income here provided you do not have children.
The difference is a better lifestyle, better weather, fewer aches and pains etc.

Veronica
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Many thanks to all that have replied; seems there is quite a variation on the perception of living 'comfortably'! I do know that the cost of eating out in Cyprus has risen hugely over the years, too many people saying "This is cheap.... costs a lot more in UK" doesn't help of course.
I had 2 tours with the military, not far from Larnaca, but of course it did not represent living 'in the country'.
I don't intend to work when we come out so the lower wages aspect is not relevant; I will be living life as a 'pensioner', albeit quite a young one!

Thanks again.

Paul
 

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Veronica, so glad you cleared up the 150 euros meal out bit as it costs us that in Dubi and I was just about to have a wobble lol
 

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Veronica, so glad you cleared up the 150 euros meal out bit as it costs us that in Dubi and I was just about to have a wobble lol
Lets put it this way, a group of 5 of us went out last night. We ate at a good Chinese restaurant in Kiti, had starters, appetisers, main course, coffee, 2 bottles of wine, 4 glasses of 7up and paid just under 135eu in total. :clap2:
 

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I agree wholeheartedlywith you Kimonas.
I am constantly telling people with children that this is not the place for them unless they have very well paid jobs. We hear of far too many young families getting into financial difficulties because they have failed to take into account the cost of schooling and child care etc.
Its ok to take a risk when you don't have children to consider andthe extra cost of their needs but anyone with young children needs to be very sure they are doing the rightthing.
For a couple with no children and at least one of them with a reasonable income the cost of living is fairly much on a par with the UK. While some things may be more expensive, others are cheaper and in the long run it averages out.
The long and the short of it, if you can manage to live on your income in the UK you can manage on the same income here provided you do not have children.
The difference is a better lifestyle, better weather, fewer aches and pains etc.

Veronica
Good post.We have been here eight months and have to agree with Veronica
About the same as UK.
One major difference is that if you have to work, you will find it hard to maintain your equivalent lifestyle back home, skilled and semi-skilled people especially
 

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The wife and I live comfortably on 300 euro's a week. That covers all of our shopping including wine and beer. We don't smoke or drink spirits these days. We are also able to dine out at least once a month. You will find once you have settled in and done most things, you are quite happy eating at home with the odd meal out.

Also don't for God's sake buy a property without title deeds you are only asking for trouble as many will now find out. I reckon Cyprus is 40% cheaper to live in that the UK if your only home is Cyprus. Trying to run two homes is very expensive.

Hope this helps.
 

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Exact figure for the last 2 years

My wife and I are retired and have lived in Cyprus for the last 20 Years.
I have no mortgage or rent. Run 2 cars and these are the exact figures I spent in Euros.
I am not "sad" with nothing better to do, I just couldn't understand where all the money was going, so I put every penny on a spreadsheet.

2008- €28,344.44
2009- €35,683.40

I think it's very expensive to live here, and if there was a market for large houses, in town, I would sell up and go back to UK.

Hope this helps.
 

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My wife and I are retired and have lived in Cyprus for the last 20 Years.
I have no mortgage or rent. Run 2 cars and these are the exact figures I spent in Euros.
I am not "sad" with nothing better to do, I just couldn't understand where all the money was going, so I put every penny on a spreadsheet.

2008- €28,344.44
2009- €35,683.40

I think it's very expensive to live here, and if there was a market for large houses, in town, I would sell up and go back to UK.

Hope this helps.
WOW!! Those figures are very frightening.:(:(
 

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WOW!! Those figures are very frightening.:(:(
Yes those figures are very frightening if that was the norm. Heaven knows what he spends it on.
We can comfortably manage a small mortgage, run two cars and have a good standard of living on 25.000euros.
We go out when we want to, enjoy a nice bottle of wine when we want and go out for meals.

Veronica
 

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Pool man I assume with that user name you supplement your pension cleaning pools?
If so how can you have the cheek to come and moan when you are taking work away from local people who are bringing up families on a pittance and cant find extra work to make ends meet.
You are spending in the region of 624euros a week. Wow wouldnt we all love to have that to spend.
 

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My wife and I are retired and have lived in Cyprus for the last 20 Years.
I have no mortgage or rent. Run 2 cars and these are the exact figures I spent in Euros.
I am not "sad" with nothing better to do, I just couldn't understand where all the money was going, so I put every penny on a spreadsheet.

2008- €28,344.44
2009- €35,683.40

I think it's very expensive to live here, and if there was a market for large houses, in town, I would sell up and go back to UK.

Hope this helps.
That's almost €100 a day. What on earth are you doing to spend that?????
 
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