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What do you mean - you were robbed, Bellthorpe? Isn't your apartment to your liking? Or were you actually robbed in Annecy? Neither seem likely to me given how much I know you love Annecy, which does indeed sound like a classy place. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Heh, all I mean by that slang expression is that Annecy was robbed in the placings.
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it should have been in first place!​
 

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Interesting list - I see they have Rambouillet (not far from where I live) on the "top ten" list. And, Lens, where my sister-in-law lives as the worst. I suspect there may be some "cultural" issues here in how the top and bottom 10 were arrived at.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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^ don't make me bust out in some slang to test that, heh heh. No but, we do use "I/he/we was/were robbed" sometimes too, if someone doesn't win something they wanted and felt deserved.
 

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^ don't make me bust out in some slang to test that, heh heh. No but, we do use "I/he/we was/were robbed" sometimes too, if someone doesn't win something they wanted and felt deserved.
Yep, that's how it's used in Oz - and mostly for sports, Aussies overall being sports crazy (and known for it). :D But in Australia it's really a very, very common expression.
 

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haha in America I feel like it's used more for performance/talent type competitions, which could be subjective. (ooor maybe that's because I don't watch sports) But def same idea!
 

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I notice that the traditional expat hot spots don't score very highly. Villeneuve-sur-Lot is ranked 256 :D

In fact the whole of the Dordogne is a bit naff by the looks of it.

Montpellier is 206 :eek:

Grenoble is 25 yet has (I was once told) the highest suicide rate in France ;)

Methinks it is all about employment.

Do you work in Annecy Bellthorpe ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
My wife and I are self-employed, so yes, I 'work' in Annecy. But not working for a French firm, that's not a factor in choosing where to live. We actually divide our time between Annecy and Washington DC, although there's lots of other travel as well.
 

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Bourgoin-Jallieu coming in at number 8 ???? That is a bit weird to be fair.

That kinda shows how stats don't really paint the whole picture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
No, it doesn't.

They have used thousands of data points. You could argue with the criteria chose, but you haven't. Their aggregation and slicing of the data is quite valid and useful.

You're arguing with the result because you don't like a given town. That is subjective, and statistically insignificant. You've said that the statistics don't paint the picture - it could hardly be said that you've painted the whole picture.
 

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You're arguing with the result because you don't like a given town. That is subjective, and statistically insignificant. You've said that the statistics don't paint the picture - it could hardly be said that you've painted the whole picture.
Now, I did not say I did not like the town. Where have I said that ? ;) I was implying that it is not typically somewhere that a typical 'person/expat' would want or wish to live given the choice. Montpellier vs Bourgoin-Jallieu; St Tropez vs Bourgoin-Jallieu; Biarritz vs Bourgoin-Jallieu. SW France vs Bourgoin-Jallieu :eek:. Google Bourgoin-Jallieu and you will see what I mean.

Now, I always get a b#ll#cking on this forum for advising/suggesting that expats wishing to move to France (especially for work/experience real French life) should live urban/in town/in city as they will have better access to facilities, French culture, jobs and will probably be more happier. But no, the majority what to live rural SW France and have their haircut done in the UK. :D

Methinks this survey very much authenticates what I have been saying over and over again to those looking to move to France. I personally would in fact prefer to live in Bourgoin-Jallieu than some tourist attraction in the Dordogne. Even Montpellier (which I have said many times to expats looking to move to such places) is not all that great and look, the survey kinda proves me right.

I am soooo Smeg ;)
 

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Now, I always get a b#ll#cking on this forum for advising/suggesting that expats wishing to move to France (especially for work/experience real French life) should live urban/in town/in city as they will have better access to facilities, French culture, jobs and will probably be more happier.
okay back the "understanding different English-language's slang" question that came up on this thread already... that term you used...is that supposed to indicate a bad thing? like arse-kicking? I might have guessed the opposite if not for the context ...
 

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Well, and I get the feeling that this rating of towns in France is for French folks looking for where to live - not at all the same criteria that the furriners are using anyhow. They even say early on that they're evaluating 300 ¨bassins d’emploi en France" - which kind of excludes a goodly proportion of the expats and expat wannabees anyhow. (Even, I would argue, those who claim they're looking to move for the "improved life style" and so will take "any job" rather than looking to forward their fancy careers.)
Cheers,
Bev
 

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It's always seemed a difficult subject to me, because what makes me happy may not be the same for others. And happy is what I need to have a good quality of life. While I understand that you can successfully generalise about common factors pertaining to happiness, it seems to be that even having most of the supposedly important factors is no guarantee that they will always lead to happiness!

Considering that the rating of the report is based on some factors that might not essentially relate to a "happy" life, I'm not so sure I'd trust the results too much to indicate where one (French or otherwise) might have the highest quality of life.

I do think the results are heavily focused to income. But if there are high levels of income in an area, that doesn't necessarily mean that, for example, you feel part of the community. If you have a higher average household income, are you necessarily happier? :noidea:

If the population has reduced or stayed stable, will you be less happy in that area and have a lower quality of life than in an area with a growing population? If there is a higher proportion of the local population involved in sporting activities (according to licenses), a higher percentage of casual workers on CDD's and more university graduates, are the residents of that area happier? Are these measures, all used in the survey, a true measure of where is the best place to live? :confused2:

It seems to me that the criteria may show where it might be good to work (in terms of income etc), but not necessarily where might be good to live. If you say a high income is required to achieve highly in the criteria, then logically you'd want to consider the cost of housing, services, transport, day-to-day life, and the resulting disposable income, as well as your options for spending it, in deciding just a part of the quality of life you might have.

If you know and can rely on your neighbours, and are involved in your community, should that be a factor in your quality of life? :nod:

Objective data is very important, but the subjective information about people's actual feelings must be at least as important when considering quality of life. If we know that people with a better education are generally happier, that may be a fair measure to contribute to an assessment of "life satisfaction" - but it's just one measure, and certainly not definitive, even with the other measures used in this survey. What use is a brilliant education, and a wonderfully high salary if you have no work-life balance? Yet, on this survey, that is not a consideration, and those limited factors certainly greatly colour the survey results.

Jobs and a good income are important, but they are not everything. If you feel isolated in your community, if you don't feel safe, if you don't trust the government, all can have a serious impact on your feelings of well-being. :rain:

Perhaps a little broader in terms of measurement of " a good life" are the criteria and report from the OECD: OECD Better Life Index - quite a lot more considered there.

There are comparisons between different areas of France to be had here: OECD Regional Well-Being (again, scroll down for more depth)

If you live near or in a town, have a job you like, have easy access to enough services for your needs, you feel part of the community, etc - will you be happier in a supposedly better locale? If you're retired, skip the job part, and replace it with learn French! :p :)

cheers
kaju
 

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Well, and I get the feeling that this rating of towns in France is for French folks looking for where to live -
I reckon it relates more to the satisfaction of those who are born and bred in a given area.

I think most people who move about in France do so through necessity rather than choice and therefore such a survey is irrelevant about choosing a location.

There are surveys for best places to retire in France, best places to be young, best places for this that and the other. One thing that is common in all these surveys is that town/urban/city is best and Nantes always tends to be in the top 3.

Soliel, yes it is slang for being told off.
 
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