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Just for once I heard a French TV newsreader use the term "Grande Bretagne" when they were talking about the UK. However, he was talking about school holidays, unaware that Scottish school holidays ususally start a good 3 weeks before English hols. But at least the effort was made.
 

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I heard M6 News the other day reporting on the Davis Cup and saying that 'The English' had beaten the French.

I'm sure that pleased Andy Murray. :p
 

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So if you don't count Northern Ireland, it's Great Britain? (Don't quite know why that would make it "Great').

And why wouldn't you count Northern Ireland? And if you wouldn't count Northern Ireland, why count Scotland and Wales?

I know I've been away from the UK for a very long time, but this is sooooo complicated.
 

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So if you don't count Northern Ireland, it's Great Britain? (Don't quite know why that would make it "Great').

And why wouldn't you count Northern Ireland? And if you wouldn't count Northern Ireland, why count Scotland and Wales?

I know I've been away from the UK for a very long time, but this is sooooo complicated.

I suppose it's a progression through history. Firstly, England and Wales being Britain, then growing to Great Britain with the addition of Scotland, then becoming the UK with the addition of Ireland, then still the UK after most of Ireland became independent..

Back in the day, the Romans called Wales and England Britannia Major to distinguish it from Brittany in France (Brittania Minor). It included most of England and Wales, but not Scotland. So that was how Britain was named.

Great Britain was formally created in 1707 by the Acts of Union, with Scotland joining England and Wales. It helped that back in 1603, King James VI of Scotland also become King James I of England after inheriting the English crown from Queen Elizabeth I, his double first cousin twice removed. Although this Union of the Crowns joined the countries somewhat, they were still separate countries - the political union didn't happen till the English and Scottish Parliaments passed the two Union Acts in 1706 and 1707 respectively.

Ireland joined in 1801, so at that time the Kingdom of Great Britain became the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. All of Ireland was added on then.

But of course in 1922 the southern counties of Ireland became independent as the Irish Free State, to become Eire (Ireland) in 1937, and became Eire (the Republic of Ireland) in 1949, so since 1922 it's been the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and still is. :)

So Great Britain does not include Ireland (or Northern Ireland) - that title actually only covers the bigger single landmass of England, Scotland and Wales, but the United Kingdom is the name for the nation as a whole.

So if you lived in Northern Ireland, you don't live in Great Britain, and I suppose you couldn't be called British. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Changing the subject ever so slightly - well it is "my" thread .....

I heard M6 News the other day reporting on the Davis Cup and saying that 'The English' had beaten the French. I'm sure that pleased Andy Murray

I have it on very good authority that mum Judy saw Jamie as a more accomplished player, but lacking in the will to win dept.
 

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strictly speaking you are british if you come from the british isles, which includes ireland ...but don't try telling the irish that !great britain is , as stated , an island [ biggest in europe ]

as usual there is geography and there is politics ! think of the people from the usa who call themselves americans ...but mexico and canada are equally in north america , and there are lot's of other countries in central and south america , are there not ?
 

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strictly speaking you are british if you come from the british isles, which includes ireland ...but don't try telling the irish that !great britain is , as stated , an island [ biggest in europe ]

as usual there is geography and there is politics ! think of the people from the usa who call themselves americans ...but mexico and canada are equally in north america , and there are lot's of other countries in central and south america , are there not ?
True (well geographically, if not politically)! :p :) I can see trouble ahead! :)

Then again, if you were Scottish, you could could say "We put the Great in Great Britain!"

Who'da thunk it! :)
 

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You guys are way, way beyond me here. I still get confused now and then when I hear them refer to "Bretagne" in the news, because subconsciously I guess I still translate that as "Britain" and not "Britanny." (Actually, I never use the term Britanny which might be part of my problem....)

And yes, I've been through the whole gamut of responses to why those from the USA have claimed/stolen/hogged the adjective "American" from the rest of the hemisphere. Unfortunately, there seems to be no other convenient term: USA-ans? Statesians? or the somewhat awkward "US citizens and/or permanent residents". It was bad enough when I was in the UK, but trying to translate any of that into French is just above and beyond any conceivable obligation.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Thanks everyone - it's a little clearer for me. No wonder the French are confused :D
I once spent 20 minutes with the car-hire 'blonde'.

She asked where I was going. I said 'Angleterre' and she began to check the list of approved countries.

"No, it's not there", said she. 'Grande Bretagne is on the list' I replied.

"Yes, but not Angleterre." :rolleyes:

So I went to Grande Bretagne instead. :p
 

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Since I've lived in France, I have been known as English.

When I lived in England I had to be British, although the Irish could be Irish, The Scotts, Scotish and the Welsh, Welsh, I couldn't be English!

My neighbours do not recognise our flag that comes out on big match days, they tell me my flag should be the Union Jack!

I never know what my nationality will be on the drop box on web sites!

I don't actually mind what I am called; I am just me, but it does save time when you know who you are!

Gypsycob x
 

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Since I've lived in France, I have been known as English.

When I lived in England I had to be British, although the Irish could be Irish, The Scotts, Scotish and the Welsh, Welsh, I couldn't be English!

My neighbours do not recognise our flag that comes out on big match days, they tell me my flag should be the Union Jack!

I never know what my nationality will be on the drop box on web sites!

I don't actually mind what I am called; I am just me, but it does save time when you know who you are!

Gypsycob x

Keep flying the true flag GC.

Although I hear St George wasn't actually English.

Not even Royaume Uni. :eek:
 

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Keep flying the true flag GC.

Although I hear St George wasn't actually English.

Not even Royaume Uni. :eek:
If French men are renowned for being great lovers* and English women for being easy*, then most of us will be a French/English mixture dating back to the Norman conquests!!!

*I reference generalisations in previous posts on this forum.

Names, characters, places and incidents either are products of the author’s imagination or are used fictitiously. Any resemblance to actual events or locales or persons, living or dead, is entirely coincidental.

Gypsycob x :love:
 

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Interesting seeing which flag we identify with - lots of union jacks, some English, a few Scottish, never seen a Welsh or Irish flag tho'.

And interesting too that in the smilies list there are the US, Canadian and Israeli flags - no union jack.... :noidea:
 
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