Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner
61 - 77 of 77 Posts

Registered
Joined
101 Posts
I think there are just some people who have that adventurous spirit in their DNA. I'm one of 8 siblings and I'm astounded at how different we all are despite having the same upbringing. We were not wealthy enough to travel either, but did spend a week or two in the summers traveling to Quebec from WNY to visit family. But that was it save for one trip to New Jersey. My sister and parents have lived in WNY (6 hours from NYC) for almost 60 years and NEVER been to NYC. No interest. Three sisters and one brother have never been out of the country (except for Quebec growing up). The others all traveled a bit for work.
My first time on a plane I was 16, a month out of high school and bought myself a one way ticket to Los Angeles where I stayed for 20 years on my own.
Yep. Sometimes it's just in your DNA.
Carpe diem! :)
Yes, at 18 just before going to uni my older brother gave me some money as a present for getting into uni so that I could do a bit of travelling on an Interrail ticket. First time outside the country. Away for about 6 weeks, terrified my mother. Told me she hadn't had a night's sleep while I was away. 馃槃
 

Administrator
Joined
51,971 Posts
I actually use fresh wonton wrappers to make the best fresh ravioli I've ever had in my life (and anyone I've made it for). Regular pasta ravioli is too thick and dense for my taste. Wonton wrappers are a miracle for ravioli.
Which means you're using the same kind of "egg roll skins" I have been looking for.

There are a number of "Asian food" sites online - and oddly enough a couple of them sell fresh foods including those that normally require refrigeration. I haven't looked specifically for these, but check out some of the online shops if you get a chance. Then tend toward Japanese and Vietnamese products (hence, the rice paper nem wrappers) but these days you never know - I keep getting ads touting their "new" products.
 

Registered
Joined
429 Posts
Discussion Starter · #64 ·
I'm not living in France at present but currently exploring the possibility of moving there. I find holidaying in most European countries can be a challenge when it comes to food, Greece seems about the best. I've been served some terrible slop. 馃榿

Here in the UK the most accommodating cuisine apart from Indian seems to be Szechuan. Not many of either of those in France I understand! Partly why I do most of my own cooking and would want to have a potager if I move. Lack of ingredients will certainly be a challenge. Regarding wonton wrappers, though, they're easy to make yourself, no special ingredients. I've been working on expanding my knowledge of Indian and Chinese cooking techniques by watching YouTube videos to find out how to do these things properly.

There's always quiche in France, but then there's usually bacon at the bottom of it! 馃槃
We take this when we visit France, it save eating pizzas all the time馃ぃ
Food Product Ingredient Staple food Recipe
 

Registered
Joined
14 Posts
There are systemic reasons Americans don't travel as much as EU residents, for example. A big one is the lack of paid vacation (or other type of leave). I had to hack the system to get enough time to explore in a meaningful way. Most Americans simply can't do that.

And in my case there was the real advantage of being good with languages - learning French as an adult is daunting for most people. Americans live in a language monoculture and have no idea what to do when it's not possible to just get by with English. I'm thinking of a specific scene in a breakfast room in a hotel outside Paris where an American guest wanted a newspaper (English) and just kept ramping up the volume (in English) in frustration.

The motivating factors? Even though I've never used the French healthcare system, it was the visceral feeling that if something went wrong there would be help and it wouldn't ruin me. I saw that people seemed connected to each other, sitting down with friends and neighbors and family for hours. The culture around food - outdoor markets, cafe culture, decent ingredients in even convenience stores. After a meal the glow of well-being! Public transit for getting around w/o a car. Clearly life in this kind of social context is much lower overhead than what we deal with on a daily basis here in the US. I could feel blocks of mental bandwidth that were previously dedicated to survival being freed up.

Also, abundant cycling and walking routes for exploring. The secondary road network is robust and drivers are trained to avoid cyclists, not aim for them or treat them as adversaries. If a driver hits someone on a bike there are legal repercussions. It's a different feeling vs. being prey.

Finally ancestry. My surname is recognized and spelled/pronounced correctly, which counts for a lot. :)
 

Registered
Joined
2,446 Posts
Yep, thats where I get it, minimum order about 拢70 I think, but we do by other stuff from there
Ha ha, I had no idea what it was so just did a very quick online search. Didn't check prices or conditions. It's really not a product that interests me personally.
 

Registered
Joined
429 Posts
Discussion Starter · #71 ·
Ha ha, I had no idea what it was so just did a very quick online search. Didn't check prices or conditions. It's really not a product that interests me personally.
Understood, its not everyone's cup of tea, although a friend of mine who's the biggest meat eater i know, absolutely loves the stuff. Who knows eh(y)
 

Administrator
Joined
51,971 Posts
Also, abundant cycling and walking routes for exploring. The secondary road network is robust and drivers are trained to avoid cyclists, not aim for them or treat them as adversaries. If a driver hits someone on a bike there are legal repercussions. It's a different feeling vs. being prey.
It may depend a bit where you are exactly in France. Where I live, riding a bicycle on the secondary roads means taking your life in your hands - unless you are part of one of those bike clubs that take over the roads on the weekends. (There really IS safety in numbers.) Cycling is fine as a sport, but not so practical as a daily means of transportation.
Finally ancestry. My surname is recognized and spelled/pronounced correctly, which counts for a lot.
OK, THAT one I am in full agreement with. First time in my life that my surname is pronounced and written correctly every time. It's a great feeling, innit?
 

Registered
Joined
2,446 Posts
Understood, its not everyone's cup of tea, although a friend of mine who's the biggest meat eater i know, absolutely loves the stuff. Who knows eh(y)
However I don't much like meat anyway, so when I do eat it I try to disguise it, not the other way around 馃ぃ
 
61 - 77 of 77 Posts
Top