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I didn't really want to start a new thread, but I guess the Rittenhouse verdict will be exercising a few American minds......as Bev referred to her first reply.

Very Sad.
 

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I didn't really want to start a new thread, but I guess the Rittenhouse verdict will be exercising a few American minds......as Bev referred to her first reply.

Very Sad.
It's unbelievable. Like so much that's been going on here the last several years. I feel like I don't even recognize my own country a lot of the time. (Maybe that's a normal thing as you get older? I don't know.)
 

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Given various analyses of the Rittenhouse verdict, I have little hope left for the three ******** who chased and killed Ahmaud Arbery - though at least the prosecutor in that case seems to have been a bit more on the ball in her cross examination. And this week there are so many examples of how far gone the US seems to be these days.
 

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I didn't really want to start a new thread, but I guess the Rittenhouse verdict will be exercising a few American minds......as Bev referred to her first reply.

Very Sad.
Having served on a murder trial jury years ago, I can find the verdict understandable. The jury does not get to see what the general public sees. The jury is bound by WI law and has instructions from the judge.

The problem is the perception among the masses that this somehow gives them some sort of new permission or validation. Not good.
 

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Have seen several analyses by US lawyers, prosecutors and all the former prosecutors turned TV consultants - all of them saying that the problem here is the laws in the US. Evidently the kid didn't need to actually be under threat - just to believe he was being threatened so that he feared for his life. Actually, the judge in the case also bent things to favor the kid, including taking the weapons charge off the table (and at the last minute at that).

In some ways, the issue here really has more to do with the stupid gun laws in the US. (There is, after all, a reason why 17 year olds are NOT legally able to purchase a semi-automatic weapon like that. Never mind that he probably had no training on how to operate the thing.)
 

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The problem is that they can buy those weapons at all (and just head out to use them).
And that their Mommies will drive them to the sites to play vigilante like little Kyle did. The inmates have taken over the asylum over there. Now some Republicans are talking about offering the kid a Congressional internship. And they thought January 6th was a crazy day in Congress!
 

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'you can take the boy out of Sarf London, but you can't take Sarf London outta the boy'
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Keep an eye on 'le Bistro' Boiler and you will soon see why many Americans favor France....;Jeez, just happy to be here in my quiet little corner.
 

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My primary hobby is photography, and there is so much I want to take pictures of...
Just avoid taking pictures of people when you're in France, as French law now insists that you ask permission first, unless that person is in a situation (e.g. an anti-vax demonstration) that they should reasonably expect to be photographed.
But good old fashioned street photography?
If Cartier-Bresson were alive today he wouldn't be able to take most of the pictures that he was famous for taking.
 

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Just avoid taking pictures of people when you're in France, as French law now insists that you ask permission first, unless that person is in a situation (e.g. an anti-vax demonstration) that they should reasonably expect to be photographed.
But good old fashioned street photography?
If Cartier-Bresson were alive today he wouldn't be able to take most of the pictures that he was famous for taking.
France isn't the only country that has such laws. There is a good reason for them in this day and age.
 

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Interesting discussion.
I am American (born to French Canadian parents from Montreal) married to a Frenchman who moved to the US at age 29 (we are now 58 and 60). He also lived in England and Ivory Coast before moving to California. I grew up in WNY and then spent 20 years in SoCal before heading back to WNY where we raised our 2 girls.
Being empty nesters we began traveling more and then thanks to C19 lockdowns decimating my husband's business we chose to rent out our home and move to France - for a year and then we'll see. We have dual citizenship so we can now be on French healthcare. A HUGE savings as both of us were/are self employed and in the US it cost us a small fortune. We have come back mostly for my husband to spend quality time with his aging mom and the bonus is saving on healthcare. My husbands entire family is here also.
BUT as I read comments from US folk saying they no longer recognize their country, I will tell you that my husband says the same about his homeland. He also finds French bureaucracy incredibly frustrating.
I lived 7 months in Paris in my 20s before meeting my husband in Los Angeles and we've spent many summers here and both of us have been able to be pretty fair in discussing pros and cons of both countries/cultures.
There simply is no perfect place on earth. For every pro, there's a con somewhere, no matter where you are.
We are in the South of France, on the coast. It's beautiful here. I often feel I'm walking into a postcard. But there are many things I miss as well.

I'll update at the end of our time if we feel ready to go back and stay, or pack up and return.

It is true that many US people never consider living abroad. Keeping in mind the size of our country and how few people even own a passport, don't speak a 2nd language even at a basic level, don't have the funds for overseas travel and feel there is so much to see in their own country...in the US we are not exposed to multiple languages and cultures and borders growing up. You can travel in the US for days and little has changed. I think this makes most people nervous about going outside their comfort zone. They are not used to communication barriers and feel the loss of control is not only an unpleasant experience but a frustrating one. I get it. I am one of 8 siblings who were raised with French speaking parents and yet I'm the only one who has traveled internationally for pleasure and adventure.
When I lived in Paris in my 20s (1988) people were very interested in the fact that I was from California. It gave me a certain special status, in fact. But culturally and socially, I definitely did not fit in and despite wanting to stay a year, I went home after 7 months emotionally exhausted and drained.

I do think we are taught European history and its relevance..I know I had a whole class on it in high school. I just wasn't interested at the time.
 

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BUT as I read comments from US folk saying they no longer recognize their country, I will tell you that my husband says the same about his homeland. He also finds French bureaucracy incredibly frustrating.
I think this is pretty typical for anyone who has been away from their long-term residence for a while, no matter what country. Though for Americans it is maybe a bit more "intense" given that in many ways the US is a giant "island nation" that tends to assume that other cultures are all just dying to become just like them. (Nothing wrong with that - the Brits were that way for centuries. And so were the French.)
It is true that many US people never consider living abroad. Keeping in mind the size of our country and how few people even own a passport, don't speak a 2nd language even at a basic level, don't have the funds for overseas travel and feel there is so much to see in their own country...in the US we are not exposed to multiple languages and cultures and borders growing up. You can travel in the US for days and little has changed. I think this makes most people nervous about going outside their comfort zone.
And again, I have to say that in 30 years or so of living here, I find the same to be true of the French (also the Germans and other nationalities I know). No one likes getting out of their comfort zone for the long term - which includes language, food, customs, dress and all sorts of little stuff. Visiting a foreign country is nice (for some - the French tend to consider travel to other regions to be foreign enough for their tastes <g>) but actually living there is something completely different. You only have to choose a doctor who posts online that English is one of the languages they speak, only to find that if they notice that you CAN speak French, they will insist that you start off in French. (Can't say that I blame them - their liability for errors increases quite a bit if they are working in a foreign language like that.)

Have to chuckle at your comment about "You can travel in the US for days and little has changed." It really does depend on how long you have been gone and how and when you return - but my first foray overseas was for only 11 months when I went to live in the UK. Plenty had changed just in my part of California by the time I got back - it just depends on what you have reason to notice (or not). But I hear similar comments on how much things have changed from Italian friends who regularly return to Italy for vacations or to see friends and family there.
 
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