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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,

I am a certified welding inspector who will be relocating to the south of France in July following my spouse. I’m looking for work in any quality control field as it pertains to welding. If anybody could provide me a lead into a position such as this, I would greatly appreciate it.

Thank you ,

Tony
 

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Do you speak any French? If not, finding any sort of a job is going to be, well, something of a challenge.

Will you have the right to work in France? If your wife is French, it takes a bit of paperwork before you become street legal - figure on a good 3 months or more before you'll have the official documents that show you have the right to work. (Actually, enjoy the holiday while you can. It goes by all too quickly!)

If your wife is on a work visa herself, be sure to check to see what sort of visa you'll be getting. If you're going on a dependent visa, there's a real likelihood you won't have work privileges and may have to become a "trailing spouse." If she is going over on a "scientific or research" visa, you may well have working privileges, but it will take a few months to get your immigration procedures squared away to the point that any employer will be willing to talk to you.

If you'll have work privileges, you should probably contact Pole d'Emploi once you get to France. This is the "unemployment office" but they have lots of information available that you can use even before you get enrolled in the system or qualify for benefits. If you need French lessons, they can probably point you in the right direction - and they should be able to help you get your qualifications recognized or validated for France.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Do you speak any French? If not, finding any sort of a job is going to be, well, something of a challenge.

Will you have the right to work in France? If your wife is French, it takes a bit of paperwork before you become street legal - figure on a good 3 months or more before you'll have the official documents that show you have the right to work. (Actually, enjoy the holiday while you can. It goes by all too quickly!)

If your wife is on a work visa herself, be sure to check to see what sort of visa you'll be getting. If you're going on a dependent visa, there's a real likelihood you won't have work privileges and may have to become a "trailing spouse." If she is going over on a "scientific or research" visa, you may well have working privileges, but it will take a few months to get your immigration procedures squared away to the point that any employer will be willing to talk to you.

If you'll have work privileges, you should probably contact Pole d'Emploi once you get to France. This is the "unemployment office" but they have lots of information available that you can use even before you get enrolled in the system or qualify for benefits. If you need French lessons, they can probably point you in the right direction - and they should be able to help you get your qualifications recognized or validated for France.
Cheers,
Bev
Dear Bev,
thank you for your fast answer! Please pardon my english, this the wife answering. Yes, I am french, from montpellier, but have lived and taught most of my adult life in the US: came as an exchanged student, started to teach on campus, met my husband, never left... the classic story.
However due to family reasons we will be relocating this summer. We will pick up my husbannd working/long stay visa at the embassy and yes again he speaks french, not as fluent as if he lived in the country but good enough. Our biggest worries are employments opportunities for him: having left as a 20 year old I never really had a "real job" or used "pole emploi/ANPE".
Ideally we would have liked to find something from here, the US, but thought we would post on the forum.
Thank you so much again for your repply, and thanks for helping expats get around. It seemed much easier to me when i just had to pack a suitcase and leave 10 years ago ;)
Encore merci,

Laura
 

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Admittedly it would be nice if he could find a job - or at least line up some interviews - before you move to France. Practically speaking, however, most employers want to be very careful not to "accidentally" hire someone who may not actually have a work permit. Although technically, your husband should be allowed to work as soon as he has entered France with his spouse visa, most employers won't want to talk to him until he has gone through the OFII process (which includes getting his medical exam and signing the "contrat d'accueil et d'integration") because at that point he'll have his titre de séjour, in the form of a sticker in his passport.

Pole d'Emploi is what the ANPE is now called here. They have been very helpful to many new arrivals here in France and can help him put together a French style resume, as well as evaluating his credentials and work experience. (Some folks lately have reported that some of this is done as part of the OFII appointment. I think it depends on the departement you'll be living in.)
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Admittedly it would be nice if he could find a job - or at least line up some interviews - before you move to France. Practically speaking, however, most employers want to be very careful not to "accidentally" hire someone who may not actually have a work permit. Although technically, your husband should be allowed to work as soon as he has entered France with his spouse visa, most employers won't want to talk to him until he has gone through the OFII process (which includes getting his medical exam and signing the "contrat d'accueil et d'integration") because at that point he'll have his titre de séjour, in the form of a sticker in his passport.

Pole d'Emploi is what the ANPE is now called here. They have been very helpful to many new arrivals here in France and can help him put together a French style resume, as well as evaluating his credentials and work experience. (Some folks lately have reported that some of this is done as part of the OFII appointment. I think it depends on the departement you'll be living in.)
Cheers,
Bev

Bev,
Thanks again for the feedback. We looked at the Pole d'Emploi website yesterday and found a few postings that looked to be up my alley. The wife and I did our best to translate my English resumé for the technical terms specific to my industry. The one good thing is that most postings in my field require fluency in English, although I'm sure fluency in French is probably assumed (I wouldn't call myself fluent in French quite yet).

While we are both hopeful of finding jobs in our respecitve industries ahead of our move, there is a strong liklihood that one or both of us will be moving to France unemployed. I was curious if you had an idea of if we would qualify for unemployment benefits / social security right away knowing that my wife has never paid taxes in here home country and I'm coming in on a long stay visa.

Regards,
Tony
 

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For unemployment benefits, you need to have been accepted for benefits by another EU country. That allows you to get up to 3 months of unemployment on arrival in France, but after that you're on your own. Coming from the US, I'm afraid there is no reciprocity.
Cheers,
Bev
 
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