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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello All-

I am an American attorney practicing Labor & Employment law at a large law firm in Philadelphia. My wife and I have three young children (5, 3, and 6 months). We should be Italian citizens soon (just waiting on our papers, which should be here within a few months), but speak limited Italian at this point.

We would like to relocate. We love Lucca, but haven't gotten too far ahead of ourselves in deciding on a location. I don't necessarily need to be working in a law-related job, but I would need a job that pays a good salary because of student loans, etc. I make well over 100k right now. I would expect to take somewhat of a paycut, but can't be impoverished. You get the picture.

I don't even know where to begin looking for work. Does anyone here have any advice or ideas? Any input is appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Paul
 

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The only possible idea is to find an international law firm with Italian offices. Even that would assume you're willing to shift to a different area of law.

Other then that I can't see much.
 

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The only possible idea is to find an international law firm with Italian offices. Even that would assume you're willing to shift to a different area of law.

Other then that I can't see much.
I know of two in this area law firms with ofices here and philly when you've had inugh posts il pm you with their pemision their contact details
 

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You need 5 legitimate posts (i.e. not nonsense posts made just to get your post count up) before you have PM privileges. And once you've posted your 5th post, you have to give the system some time to come through and adjust your status. (An hour or two should do it.)

Speaking "limited Italian" is going to be a huge challenge when looking for a job in Italy. Although some multinational companies claim English as the "company language" you'll find that the local managers are very unlikely to hire someone who isn't fluent (or at least at a good conversational level) in the local language. It's more or less the case that most folks speak the local language among themselves and with their day to day colleagues, while English is reserved for when the "suits" (i.e. executives) are in town.

You may also want to take a look at pay scales in Italy. Throughout most of Europe, you aren't likely to get paid anywhere near what you're making in the US, as there simply isn't the same pay disparity here. You may want to take a look at the Monster.it site to get a feel for what types of jobs are up for grabs, the qualifications they are asking for and (sometimes) an idea of the pay scales in the various professions.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Excellent, thanks. I figured I would take a hefty paycut, I just need enough to feed my children (who seem to double in size daily). Really looking for a quality of life kind of transition.

I will check out Monster.it. Thanks again.

P

You need 5 legitimate posts (i.e. not nonsense posts made just to get your post count up) before you have PM privileges. And once you've posted your 5th post, you have to give the system some time to come through and adjust your status. (An hour or two should do it.)

Speaking "limited Italian" is going to be a huge challenge when looking for a job in Italy. Although some multinational companies claim English as the "company language" you'll find that the local managers are very unlikely to hire someone who isn't fluent (or at least at a good conversational level) in the local language. It's more or less the case that most folks speak the local language among themselves and with their day to day colleagues, while English is reserved for when the "suits" (i.e. executives) are in town.

You may also want to take a look at pay scales in Italy. Throughout most of Europe, you aren't likely to get paid anywhere near what you're making in the US, as there simply isn't the same pay disparity here. You may want to take a look at the Monster.it site to get a feel for what types of jobs are up for grabs, the qualifications they are asking for and (sometimes) an idea of the pay scales in the various professions.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Interesting. I am also a veteran, so I might get hiring priority for some of these postings.

You can also keep an eye on the listings at this site but be aware that many of these jobs are not open to dual citizens (more specifically, persons with Italian citizenship) due to military "status of forces" agreements.
 
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