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I have French/British dual nationality but have lived and worked in the UK until ten years ago when I left Europe, living in Asia and returning home infrequently and for short visits.

I don't want to return to the UK. I still pay taxes there, but cannot be said to be resident anywhere for the time being.

A French friend believes that even though I have never contributed, that by virtue of having French natinality, I am entitled to certain benefits and might even be entitled to some pension. I still pay my NI contributions on a self employed basid in the UK.

My first question is whether I am covered for healthcare in France. My understanding is that I'm not any more in the UK due to being non resident.

And if not (which I assume to be the case), what do I have to do?

My next question is whether I am really entitled to anything even if I hold a French passport and have come back to France. I currently still work on a voluntary basis for a UK charity in Nepal.
 

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Generally speaking, eligibility for benefits of any sort in France depends primarily on your having contributed to the social insurance system by paying "cotisations" over a period of time. There are a few exceptions, but even there, you have to be able to show that you are legitimately resident in France (usually for at least three months or more).
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Subject to your income (which would need to be pretty low), you may be entitled to the RSA once you can demonstrate that you reside "en France de manière stable et effective". See this site Revenu de solidarité active (RSA) - Service-public.fr.

Once you have been resident in France for 3 months you can apply for the CMU - you would be required to pay 8% of your worldwide income (taxable or not) over Euros 9,601 and it could take a couple of months or so for your application to be approved. See this site CMU : couverture maladie universelle. Expect to be asked what health cover you had until you applied.
 

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Thank you very much. This is very useful indeed and what I thought. Three months isn't at all long either, as I was concerned I'd have to stay at least six. The French government seem to look after their nationals working abroad extremely well, so it was still worth asking the question. My friend has worked much of her life abroad for organisations like MSF but now isn't earning.
 

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But your entitlement to healthcare in France would be dependent on you being classed as resident in France. The 'three months' presupposes that it's the first 3 months of permanent residence; eg visitors who come to France for 4, 5, 6 month holidays cannot join CMU, because they are resident elsewhere. If you're still paying NICs and tax in the UK - you may not consider yourself UK resident but HMRC clearly do. And under EU regs, a person cannot contribute to/be covered by the social security systems of 2 different states at the same time. Before accepting people onto CMU France normally requires proof that they don't have entitlement to healthcare via any other route, which in your case would be a letter from HMRC/DWP stating that you have no entitlement with them.
So I think you would need to somehow get out of HMRC's clutches before you would be able to pay tax in France and contribute to the French social security system.
I don't understand why you think you're not entitled to healthcare in the UK. If they allow you to pay NICs it suggests that they are allowing you to remain in the NHS. I presume they know your circumstances?
Either way, continuing to pay self-employed NICs in the UK and cotisations in France at the same time would be a definite no-no. You can't claim to be resident in France and self-employed in the UK at the same time.
 

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Verite, the OP's entitlement is that of a French citizen (not quite the same as a non-French EU citizen - see previous links). EuroTrash - excellent point!
 

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Verite, the OP's entitlement is that of a French citizen (not quite the same as a non-French EU citizen - see previous links). EuroTrash - excellent point!
I have looked at your link again, and don't see the difference.....
whether you are French or Etranger the information seems to be the same, but maybe I am not reading the right bit?
 

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I have looked at your link again, and don't see the difference.....
whether you are French or Etranger the information seems to be the same, but maybe I am not reading the right bit?
You are correct in that the OP cannot be contributing to the NHS and join the CMU. However, if the OP establishes residence in France, then he/she becomes French tax resident, would need to change his/her self-employment status to France, etc. The difference is that it's extremely difficult for the CMU to reject a French citizen once residence in France is established and where the previous health cover no longer applies.
 

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I have found this:

La CMU pour les Français de l’étranger de retour en France - Assemblée des Français de l'étranger (AFE)

which is a question/answer regarding CMU cover for French nationals returning to France, which seems to indicate that "unofficially" French nationals can be granted immediate cover, without the 3 month wait. However it appears that it depends on the SS office you contact, some do and some don't! Of course you must not be entitled to health cover in any other country.

Officially there is no legislation that allows this, it is a "tolerance".

Clearly it pays to ask around the CPAMs!
 

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You are correct in that the OP cannot be contributing to the NHS and join the CMU. However, if the OP establishes residence in France, then he/she becomes French tax resident, would need to change his/her self-employment status to France, etc. The difference is that it's extremely difficult for the CMU to reject a French citizen once residence in France is established and where the previous health cover no longer applies.
OK thank you.
 

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if the OP establishes residence in France, then he/she becomes French tax resident, would need to change his/her self-employment status to France, etc.
As a self-employed person he couldn't join CMU. Normally he should pay tax and cotisations via his self-employment - whatever that is, which I don't think he's mentioned.
 

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I have found this:

La CMU pour les Français de l’étranger de retour en France - Assemblée des Français de l'étranger (AFE)

which is a question/answer regarding CMU cover for French nationals returning to France, which seems to indicate that "unofficially" French nationals can be granted immediate cover, without the 3 month wait. However it appears that it depends on the SS office you contact, some do and some don't! Of course you must not be entitled to health cover in any other country.

Officially there is no legislation that allows this, it is a "tolerance".

Oh, and BTW, French nationals don't have to demonstrate an income in excess of Euros 9,601, which I understand is the case for Brits, to get access to CMU,

Clearly it pays to ask around the CPAMs!
I hadn't seen that. It's interesting because I had my French nationality confirmed before I applied, had lived in Australia for 42 years, and they asked me about my cover to that point (my private international health cover had by then expired). But there may possibly be an issue with the interpretation of 'expatries' - i.e. in terms of having previously been resident in France. Anyway, they didn't have an issue with the earlier expiry of my health insurance and covered me from the date of application. That said, I'm not surprised it is a "tolerance" because otherwise the applicant could seek to have the State cover their costs and the State would be disinclined to refuse a French national. But in essence it gets back to the principle of universal health cover and, whilst you can easily understand that France wants to minimise potential costs for foreigners who come to live here, how can you deny one of your own nationals and still claim that it's universal cover?
 
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