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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all, I have severe allergies and plan to move away from my little American town in the south to somewhere better suited to my allergy condition and personality. How are the allergies in Georgia? I would prefer to live near an ocean since I've heard that salty breezes help with allergies, but the cost of living is so low in Georgia and the mountain views so beautiful that I can't help but consider it. I would enjoy learning the language and the culture so those aspects are not much of an issue for me. I am mostly concerned with allergies. I don't want to move across the world just to have the same allergy problems I am experiencing now.
 

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Hello all, I have severe allergies and plan to move away from my little American town in the south to somewhere better suited to my allergy condition and personality. How are the allergies in Georgia? I would prefer to live near an ocean since I've heard that salty breezes help with allergies, but the cost of living is so low in Georgia and the mountain views so beautiful that I can't help but consider it. I would enjoy learning the language and the culture so those aspects are not much of an issue for me. I am mostly concerned with allergies. I don't want to move across the world just to have the same allergy problems I am experiencing now.
What kind of allergies?

What are your doctors telling you about the ideal climate for you to live in?

My aunt has severe asthma and her doctors told her to either move to an island in the North Sea or up high into the Alps. She decided on an island in the North Sea because that was easier to access from Berlin and not so far from the extended family.

EDIT: Also, have you checked that you meet the requirements for a residence permit and, if you need to work, for a work permit in Georgia? If not, it doesn't really matter how your allergies would be doing there.
 

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Just to add a bit to what ALKB has said.... I found that the times I moved to a "different climate" I usually got a year's worth of free pass on the allergies (mostly pollen and plant allergies in my case) simply because of the different set of plants in the new area. The second year and beyond, your system seems to adjust to the new pollens and compensates with allergic reactions to whatever is most similar to what you reacted to back home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What kind of allergies?

What are your doctors telling you about the ideal climate for you to live in?

My aunt has severe asthma and her doctors told her to either move to an island in the North Sea or up high into the Alps. She decided on an island in the North Sea because that was easier to access from Berlin and not so far from the extended family.

EDIT: Also, have you checked that you meet the requirements for a residence permit and, if you need to work, for a work permit in Georgia? If not, it doesn't really matter how your allergies would be doing there.
I am only sensitive to pollen and mold. I have been recommended to move to a costal area. I am considering an area of Georgia on the coast of the Black Sea. The pollen in Georgia could not possibly be worse than where I currently live in the southern U.S., but I wonder if I would be better suited to Georgia or somewhere such as the Isle of Man, or even Malta. Allergies and taxes are my primary motivations for moving. I really do like the business and tax situation in Georgia at the moment since I think it would be a good place to run my future business.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Just to add a bit to what ALKB has said.... I found that the times I moved to a "different climate" I usually got a year's worth of free pass on the allergies (mostly pollen and plant allergies in my case) simply because of the different set of plants in the new area. The second year and beyond, your system seems to adjust to the new pollens and compensates with allergic reactions to whatever is most similar to what you reacted to back home.
This is something I am very worried about. I don't want to move just to be in the same situation I am in now. I have heard that places in Europe are usually easier for people with allergies. One of my professors told me that his Swiss wife had little to no allergy issues before moving to the U.S., but now suffers as bad as I do. I think it is a matter of degree. I live in one of the worst places in the world for allergy sufferers so nearly any other place would be an improvement. I am trying to decide which European country would be optimal both for pollen count and tax burden.
 

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I am only sensitive to pollen and mold. I have been recommended to move to a costal area. I am considering an area of Georgia on the coast of the Black Sea. The pollen in Georgia could not possibly be worse than where I currently live in the southern U.S., but I wonder if I would be better suited to Georgia or somewhere such as the Isle of Man, or even Malta. Allergies and taxes are my primary motivations for moving. I really do like the business and tax situation in Georgia at the moment since I think it would be a good place to run my future business.
Switzerland would fall into the caregory of high nto the Alps.

Future business? So, not an existing one you want to relocate, right?

How much money do you have to invest in the economy of your potential future host country?

If the isle of man follows UK immigration rules (not sure if they do but you'd have to apply at the British Embassy nearest to you, so it might be the case), then you'd need a business investment of about £ 2 million.

In Malta, I think you can buy a property for at least € 200,000 in one of the least desirable areas of the island or so and prove a certain amount of passive income to get a residence permit.

In most cases, countries will check your capital for investment and your business plan and decide whether you starting that business would be in the interest of their economy, it's not a guaranteed visa at all.

I find it interesting that Americans appear to tend to think of taxes first and of actual permission to be economically active second, if at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Switzerland would fall into the caregory of high nto the Alps.

Future business? So, not an existing one you want to relocate, right?

How much money do you have to invest in the economy of your potential future host country?

If the isle of man follows UK immigration rules (not sure if they do but you'd have to apply at the British Embassy nearest to you, so it might be the case), then you'd need a business investment of about £ 2 million.

In Malta, I think you can buy a property for at least € 200,000 in one of the least desirable areas of the island or so and prove a certain amount of passive income to get a residence permit.

In most cases, countries will check your capital for investment and your business plan and decide whether you starting that business would be in the interest of their economy, it's not a guaranteed visa at all.

I find it interesting that Americans appear to tend to think of taxes first and of actual permission to be economically active second, if at all.
Money is not much of a concern for me, although I would prefer to spend as little as possible to gain residence and citizenship. If the investment required is £ 2 million then I might as well set my eyes on somewhere such as Monaco. Is getting a work visa not a viable strategy for what I am trying to achieve? I wouldn't mind a simple part time job or something similar.
 

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Generally speaking, to get a work permit you need to first find a job and then have your employer sponsor the related work authorization. Various countries in Europe have their own requirements for what sorts of jobs can be qualified for work authorization and how. Otherwise, you need to either invest in the country (usually a business within the country) or start up your own business with a certain minimum investment and/or the promise of employing some number of locals or bringing some needed technology or skills to the country.

And since you're from the US, you should probably be aware of the US tax regulations about overseas investment. With as little as a 10% investment in an overseas company you can wind up subjecting the business to having to submit full US-style financial statements to the IRS each year. Investing abroad in a passive manner involves other sorts of interesting and time consuming (for your tax consultant) filings and schedules.
 

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Money is not much of a concern for me, although I would prefer to spend as little as possible to gain residence and citizenship. If the investment required is £ 2 million then I might as well set my eyes on somewhere such as Monaco. Is getting a work visa not a viable strategy for what I am trying to achieve? I wouldn't mind a simple part time job or something similar.
Simple and part time are pretty much the polar opposite of what is generally required for work authorization.

Usually, the job that will be eligible for sponsoring a foreigner will likely be: highly skilled, within a shortage occupation/sector, rare and most probably also of a minimum salary level that is either equal to a sort of living wage for the country or way above that. Part time would probably not tick that box.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Considering the potentially nasty tax situation and the annoyance of dealing with work visas it seems my best option is to gain a quick (~12 months) citizenship by investment somewhere such as Malta and then renounce my U.S. citizenship.
 

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Considering the potentially nasty tax situation and the annoyance of dealing with work visas it seems my best option is to gain a quick (~12 months) citizenship by investment somewhere such as Malta and then renounce my U.S. citizenship.
That's a really expensive way of getting naturalized. Unless you are very, very rich, the cost of that path to a European citizenship would eclipse any kind of tax you may have to pay.

But yes, it appears that Malta is still offering citizenship by investment, even though they got in trouble for it with the EU.
 

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Considering the potentially nasty tax situation and the annoyance of dealing with work visas it seems my best option is to gain a quick (~12 months) citizenship by investment somewhere such as Malta and then renounce my U.S. citizenship.
https://seriale.best/
Interesting idea. Even very interesting and intriguing to me. Not so much the salty breeze, but the Iodyne that is there. More about it here Health Benefits of Iodine
 

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