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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anybody help with the correct info please?

I have a friend who has rescued a Dobermann, he is staying here in Andalucia where it is now the law that he must get a licence for her BEFORE he can microchip & vaccinate her. He is only here a short while and wants to take her back to the UK with him in January - he will not be applying for residency nor does he want to go to the expense of getting a licence for her as you can imagine (which he can't do without residency anyway).

In the Alicante region what are the rules/regs? His uncle lives in Alicante so is no problem for him to bring the dog to there and passport her if he can? It all seems so bloomin' difficult for someone that just wants to give a lovely dog a new life in the UK!!! She hasn't got a bad bone in her body!!

Many thanks
 

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It's crazy! We have a Rhodesian Ridgeback, 54 kilos of muscle...but not listed as a 'Dangerous Dog', which he isn't anyway.
We have everything required by law - passport, microchip, vaccines, insurance up to 300000 euros but everytime we attempted to register him as a perro peligroso we were told he isn't - although he has all the characteristics he isn't listed and he seems to be the only RR around here. It's obviously not a common breed.
We went to the vet who laughed and said 'He no dangerous dog. She' -pointing to her small tartan dress clad Yorkie under the table -'She dangerous dog ha ha!!'.
We asked the police who asked if we had microchip etc. and we said yes and they said 'Nada pasa'.
He is registered with the local authority but not as a dangerous dog. When in public places he is always on the leash and muzzled unlike many smaller dogs off the lead who pester him.

Because of the law our vet at the kennels is unable to chip dogs on the list in our name. We chip all our dogs, the adopter has to register the chip in his.her name. Yet we have smaller dogs which are more aggressive than these so-called dangerous breeds.

But I guess there has to be some control as a dog will generally respond to its owner's training and there are too many irresponsible owners around, sad to say.
 

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Up here the vet will chip/vaccinate any dog regardless of size & whether it should/shouldn't be registered as a 'dangerous dog'.
 

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Can anybody help with the correct info please?

I have a friend who has rescued a Dobermann, he is staying here in Andalucia where it is now the law that he must get a licence for her BEFORE he can microchip & vaccinate her. He is only here a short while and wants to take her back to the UK with him in January - he will not be applying for residency nor does he want to go to the expense of getting a licence for her as you can imagine (which he can't do without residency anyway).

In the Alicante region what are the rules/regs? His uncle lives in Alicante so is no problem for him to bring the dog to there and passport her if he can? It all seems so bloomin' difficult for someone that just wants to give a lovely dog a new life in the UK!!! She hasn't got a bad bone in her body!!

Many thanks
Sorry Donz & I am just venting my thoughts.
How does anyone know that this dog has not a bad bone in her body ?, it could turn at a moments notice and someone could get seriously injured.
IMO they and other large dogs are not called Dangerous for no reason, again IMO.

Yes I have read all the stuff that its never the dog but the owner, well that being the case the next child that gets killed/torn apart the owner should be convicted of murder.

Oh well thats going to upset a few I guess (such is life)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
not that I want to get into a debate, but if we put just a tiny few on the list, surely there should be others on that list such as GSD's, Akitas, Belgian Shepherds (have you seen what these dogs are like from working lines - pure nightmare in the wrong hands!) for example - again many of these dogs are no problem, but there are some that can be - just as my 40kg labradoodle could do the same damage as a Dobermann

But back to the point of my post. My friend has rescued this Dobermann who is just a puppy herself, & wants to get her home to the UK. In the Alicante region what is the law please? Is it the same as Andalucia where they have to have a licence BEFORE they can be chipped / vaccinated (I understand it is not but want to know the facts)

Gus can you please advise which vet you refer to so I can get in touch? It's a 5.5hr drive from here to Alicante otherwise just to find out (he is perfectly willing to do this if he can get her passported without the need for a licence) :D:fingerscrossed:
 

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Just re-read my earlier post & it seems a tad harsh, sorry if it offends anyone.
No, I don't think it was...and I help at a perrera and have a large allegedly dangerous dog.

I think that you are right in what you say in that however well-trained the dog its behaviour will be unpredictable.
Just like humans, in fact. How often do we hear of some previously inoffensive law-abiding person who commits an act of brutality out of the blue?
On the whole and judging from my experience in education, I'd say that bad owners make 'bad dogs, just as poor parenting usually results in disaffected and often maladjusted children.

Our big boy has grown up in an atmosphere of love and care. He has never known harsh treatment and is gentle and obedient. But he aggressively attacked next door's dog when they met on a walk...

We would NEVER leave our dog alone with children, would never allow him to be walked by anyone but we two or my son. Just like us, he has his 'off days'when he is grumpy because he is out of sorts. He could react aggressively to unwelcome attention.

So you were not harsh, imo at least.:)
 

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Just re-read my earlier post & it seems a tad harsh, sorry if it offends anyone.

Hi - thanks for this. I was just about to post a similarly harsh response to your original message! I used to own a Dobermann - fabulous dog; highly intelligent and very friendly both with other dogs and people! But, when my sister, then a teenager, was grabbed by two guys, in the local London park, whilst a third drove his car alongside, with the passenger door open, it was my dog who leapt into action, chased off the two violent bxxxxxxxs and saved her! Her likely fate, had my Dobe. not been unmuzzled and close by, can only be imagined.

Similarly, more recently, I was protected by my German Shepherd dog, when walking through a Plymouth park, one evening. A very drunk guy appeared from behind some bushes and came lurching towards me - my dog (on her lead) leapt forward to defend me, barking and snarling, which caused the drunk to flee, albeit unsteadily, in the opposite direction! I'm opposed to muzzling dogs, on leads, as a result of these experiences. When women and girls are safe, in all locations, outdoors, perhaps I might change my mind..! A muzzled dog would be incapable of defending either its owner or itself, in such a situation!

BTW, i'm especially opposed to the change in British law, which will punish a dog owner for any dog bite or attack which occurs on his/her own property!

I've had, at least, two encounters with unwanted salespeople, within my own garden, when living in Devon. In each case, these guys had ignored my wooden sign, nailed to my gate; 'Dogs Running Free. Do Not Enter!' Each had climbed over the padlocked gate and had then wandered in search of my front door - down the winding garden path! Incredibly luckily for them, on neither occasion were my dogs actually loose in the garden - but they might well have been...! It's a dog's natural instinct to protect the owner's property - and we were living in an isolated house, with extensive gardens, whilst our single-track country lane had no street lighting. With the aid of my dogs, we were, normally, able to enjoy life, without ever worrying that prowlers might be about!

Why, tne, should British householders now have to keep their own properties safe for such complete strangers to trespass upon? If I still lived in the UK, i'd no longer be able to leave my dogs outside, within a well-fenced garden, whilst I went shopping or to visit friends - just in case some idiot should choose to wander in, or a potential thief wished to 'case the joint!' I would face a jail sentence, should either of these trespassers be attacked by my dogs protecting my own property - how ludicrous and unjust would that be...?

The preferable solution, IMO, to the problem of uncontrolled dogs attacking innocent pedestrians in public spaces, would be to require all would-be owners of any form of live animal to undertake medical checks on their health ( inc. sanity!) along with Police checks for evidence of previous criminality!

Then, there would obligatory training in how to care for said animals, along with 'home and lifestyle checks' (as practised by reputable UK animal rescue centres), after which an annual licence could be granted - giving the person concerned the right to own and keep an animal. Such official checks would help protect defenceless creatures from cruelty and would lessen the chances of attacks by 'out of control' dogs on human beings!

BTW, I'd require the same checks and training for all potential parents - I was often aghast at the determination of so many parents to disregard all of my advice to keep their kids away from my dogs, when walking, at heel, on public roads or in parks - the typical response being; '' Oh, but my child loves big dogs!'' The arrogance of such parents was breathtaking - but, as we know - parenthood does not, necessarily confer intelligence on stupid people!

Sadly, when a child gets bitten or, worse, maimed for life, it's the dog which has to pay the ultimate price, when, usually, the humans are at fault for not taking basic precautions to keep the two apart!

I would never, even in my own home, leave a child, or baby, alone with a dog of any breed or size! Children have a habit of teasing animals, of pulling their ears and tails, or of poking them with toys - IME, dogs' signals of distress and pain are routinely ignored by the parents, until the animals retaliate in the only way they can - for self -protection!

So, why blame the dogs..?

Saludos,
GC
 
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Hi - thanks for this. I was just about to post a similarly harsh response to your original message! I used to own a Dobermann - fabulous dog; highly intelligent and very friendly both with other dogs and people! But, when my sister, then a teenager, was grabbed by two guys, in the local London park, whilst a third drove his car alongside, with the passenger door open, it was my dog who leapt into action, chased off the two violent bxxxxxxxs and saved her! Her likely fate, had my Dobe. not been unmuzzled and close by, can only be imagined.

Similarly, more recently, I was protected by my German Shepherd dog, when walking through a Plymouth park, one evening. A very drunk guy appeared from behind some bushes and came lurching towards me - my dog (on her lead) leapt forward to defend me, barking and snarling, which caused the drunk to flee, albeit unsteadily, in the opposite direction! I'm opposed to muzzling dogs, on leads, as a result of these experiences. When women and girls are safe, in all locations, outdoors, perhaps I might change my mind..! A muzzled dog would be incapable of defending either its owner or itself, in such a situation!

BTW, i'm especially opposed to the change in British law, which will punish a dog owner for any dog bite or attack which occurs on his/her own property!

I've had, at least, two encounters with unwanted salespeople, within my own garden, when living in Devon. In each case, these guys had ignored my wooden sign, nailed to my gate; 'Dogs Running Free. Do Not Enter!' Each had climbed over the padlocked gate and had then wandered in search of my front door - down the winding garden path! Incredibly luckily for them, on neither occasion were my dogs actually loose in the garden - but they might well have been...! It's a dog's natural instinct to protect the owner's property - and we were living in an isolated house, with extensive gardens, whilst our single-track country lane had no street lighting. With the aid of my dogs, we were, normally, able to enjoy life, without ever worrying that prowlers might be about!

Why, tne, should British householders now have to keep their own properties safe for such complete strangers to trespass upon? If I still lived in the UK, i'd no longer be able to leave my dogs outside, within a well-fenced garden, whilst I went shopping or to visit friends - just in case some idiot should choose to wander in, or a potential thief wished to 'case the joint!' I would face a jail sentence, should either of these trespassers be attacked by my dogs protecting my own property - how ludicrous and unjust would that be...?

The preferable solution, IMO, to the problem of uncontrolled dogs attacking innocent pedestrians in public spaces, would be to require all would-be owners of any form of live animal to undertake medical checks on their health ( inc. sanity!) along with Police checks for evidence of previous criminality!

Then, there would obligatory training in how to care for said animals, along with 'home and lifestyle checks' (as practised by reputable UK animal rescue centres), after which an annual licence could be granted - giving the person concerned the right to own and keep an animal. Such official checks would help protect defenceless creatures from cruelty and would lessen the chances of attacks by 'out of control' dogs on human beings!

BTW, I'd require the same checks and training for all potential parents - I was often aghast at the determination of so many parents to disregard all of my advice to keep their kids away from my dogs, when walking, at heel, on public roads or in parks - the typical response being; '' Oh, but my child loves big dogs!'' The arrogance of such parents was breathtaking - but, as we know - parenthood does not, necessarily confer intelligence on stupid people!

Sadly, when a child gets bitten or, worse, maimed for life, it's the dog which has to pay the ultimate price, when, usually, the humans are at fault for not taking basic precautions to keep the two apart!

I would never, even in my own home, leave a child, or baby, alone with a dog of any breed or size! Children have a habit of teasing animals, of pulling their ears and tails, or of poking them with toys - IME, dogs' signals of distress and pain are routinely ignored by the parents, until the animals retaliate in the only way they can - for self -protection!

So, why blame the dogs..?

Saludos,
GC
All very very true. It's far too easy to become a dog owner (or parent, come to that....).
In every case in the UK at least where a child or adult has been attacked by a dog the dog has been badly treated, either by being shut up and never walked or by harsh training methods or even none.

Sandra had a similar experience to you. Until we got Our Little Azor we had always had GSDs. Our last GSD, the much-loved Ferdinand, came from Dogs Trust. We'd had him about three weeks when Sandra took him out for his evening walk by the river in our town. A guy leapt out from behind a tree, put his hand over her mouth and told her to keep quiet. Our dog was off the lead snuffling in some bushes but when Sandra bit the guy's hand and screamed abuse at him Ferdinand came to the rescue and grabbed his arm. The ******* kicked him so hard he left a muddy footprint on his chest and then ran off.

Our two dogs are the best protection ever. We can leave them to guard the house knowing only a suicidal maniac would try to break in. They are both 'inside' dogs and sleep in our room.

We adopted Xena our Cane Corso on a whim...she was brought to our perrera in a sorry state and emotion overcame common sense....But she is now part of our family.
I guess she too is a 'perra peligrosa' but just like Rhodesian Ridgebacks, this breed too is uncommon so she was registered with the authorities with no problem.

Mind you, due to poor nutrition and excessive bearing of puppies in her previous life she has no teeth worthy of the name.
But she has a very firece, blood-curdling bark. OLA is the strong silent type...a good combination.
 

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Hi all,

As you are on the subject of dangerous dogs...we are moving to the surrounding areas of alicante in the next few month and have a GSD he will have a passport as we are moving from the uk.

Is there any specific laws/licences ect in place that could make this a problem.

Any Info on this subject would be a great help.

Many thanks
Nicole
 

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Hi all,

As you are on the subject of dangerous dogs...we are moving to the surrounding areas of alicante in the next few month and have a GSD he will have a passport as we are moving from the uk.

Is there any specific laws/licences ect in place that could make this a problem.

Any Info on this subject would be a great help.

Many thanks
Nicole
You need to check if GSDs are listed as ' Dangerous Dogs' - they probably are.
If so you'll need the usual chip, passport, vaccinations but you'll also need higher value PL insurance and there is a requirement for you to undergo physical and psychological tests as well as show proof that you have no criminal record.
 

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These are the only ones on the list;

A N E X O
RAZAS DE PERROS POTENCIALMENTE PELIGROSAS
- Pitt Bull Terrier.
- Staffordshire Bull Terrier.
- American Staffordshire Terrier.
- Rottweiler.
- Dogo Argentino.
- Fila Brasileiro.
- Tosa Inu.
- Akita Inu.
- Doberman.

Sorry ! From here;
Andalucian , but can't see the list would be different from national one.

http://www.raia.es/archivo.php?id=11
 
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