Expat Forum For People Moving Overseas And Living Abroad banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi

We are looking for some advice on good areas in Murcia and Alicante.
We are considering setting up a small (probably rural) self-catering holiday business and would be keen to hear any recommendations.
A few areas I have started to research are: Pinoso, Sax, Fortuna, Calpe, Cartagena.

Also, are tourists generally here all year round or are Murcia and Alicante more seasonal? The weather looks really nice here, even in the winter months, with very little rainfall.

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
Pinoso, Sax and Fortuna are inland.

Calpe and Categena are on the coast, and hence, possibly more tourists year round.

All areas tend to have good winter weather, but, again, the coast may be warmer, but can suffer from sea mist on occasions.

If you're genuinely thinking of coming out to Spain and setting up a business, you have many things to take into account, not least the possible disadvantages that Brexit may bring.

Do lots of research, and then lots more, and good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
And ... as for lack of rainfall, an unfortunate time to pose your question ��.


All will be back to normal in a few days though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks! Yes, the weather has dipped a little these past few days. I should have mentioned I live in Palma so this won't be such a big move in terms of relocating.
Our search had initially focussed on Malaga, Granada, areas I know well. However, it seems you can get a lot more for your money in Murcia and Alicante so Im keen to find out more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
825 Posts
Hi

We are looking for some advice on good areas in Murcia and Alicante.
We are considering setting up a small (probably rural) self-catering holiday business and would be keen to hear any recommendations.
A few areas I have started to research are: Pinoso, Sax, Fortuna, Calpe, Cartagena.

Also, are tourists generally here all year round or are Murcia and Alicante more seasonal? The weather looks really nice here, even in the winter months, with very little rainfall.

Thanks.
Pinoso and Sax are quite high, 590m and 480m respectively, and that makes quite a difference with weather. In summer they will be hotter than the coast and in winter considerably colder. I live in the mountains in the north of Alicante province at 530m above sea level and the temperature in winter can be 6c colder than Alicante city. In the summer we get regular daytime temperatures in the high 30s and on occasions over 40c. We tend to head for the beach to take advantage of the sea breeze when the heat becomes too uncomfortable. The coastal areas of Alicante South and Murcia are normally hotter than Alicante North. Inland tourism is all about mountain walking and cycling and the busiest seasons are Spring and Autumn, so it's a different market than the coastal resorts like Calpe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,278 Posts
Inland tourism is all about mountain walking and cycling and the busiest seasons are Spring and Autumn, so it's a different market than the coastal resorts like Calpe.
We found that in Siurana, a tiny place in Catalonia, see photos here
https://www.google.com/search?q=Siu...X1BGMBHRevCVQQ_AUoAnoECBQQBA&biw=1199&bih=924
We went to a small campsite in summer and there was practically no one there because their main tourist season was spring and autumn when people went climbing. Catalans are big on climbing in general. I know the OPs are not looking in that area, but just to say that tourists seasons vary depending on climate and attractions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
We found that in Siurana, a tiny place in Catalonia, see photos here
https://www.google.com/search?q=Siu...X1BGMBHRevCVQQ_AUoAnoECBQQBA&biw=1199&bih=924
We went to a small campsite in summer and there was practically no one there because their main tourist season was spring and autumn when people went climbing. Catalans are big on climbing in general. I know the OPs are not looking in that area, but just to say that tourists seasons vary depending on climate and attractions.
Thanks for this. We loved Catalonia, in fact, we lived in Barcelona for a year. We wanted to settle there but found the winter quite tough, it rained a lot. We are looking for a dry climate with year round weather.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Pinoso and Sax are quite high, 590m and 480m respectively, and that makes quite a difference with weather. In summer they will be hotter than the coast and in winter considerably colder. I live in the mountains in the north of Alicante province at 530m above sea level and the temperature in winter can be 6c colder than Alicante city. In the summer we get regular daytime temperatures in the high 30s and on occasions over 40c. We tend to head for the beach to take advantage of the sea breeze when the heat becomes too uncomfortable. The coastal areas of Alicante South and Murcia are normally hotter than Alicante North. Inland tourism is all about mountain walking and cycling and the busiest seasons are Spring and Autumn, so it's a different market than the coastal resorts like Calpe.
Thanks for this, interesting to know cycling and mountain walking are popular in these areas. For the summer months, we expect to buy a place with quite a lot of land so hopeful of small weddings and retreats.

What nationalities tend to holiday here? is quite mixed?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
825 Posts
Thanks for this, interesting to know cycling and mountain walking are popular in these areas. For the summer months, we expect to buy a place with quite a lot of land so hopeful of small weddings and retreats.

What nationalities tend to holiday here? is quite mixed?
In the area where I live a lot of the houses are second homes owned by Spanish people from the big cities like Madrid. However, a few years ago I spent a few nights at a four-star hotel at Biar, on the edge of the Mariola national park, and it was packed with British mountain walkers. Some Belgian friends who live near me offer mountain biker holidays, mainly to other Belgians, and I often see cars with Dutch and German number plates driving along the mountain roads in my area. As a matter of interest, "El Tel" (football legend Terry Venables) runs a boutique hotel in a mountain village not far from me and he attracts customers from far and wide.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
825 Posts
We found that in Siurana, a tiny place in Catalonia, see photos here
https://www.google.com/search?q=Siu...X1BGMBHRevCVQQ_AUoAnoECBQQBA&biw=1199&bih=924
We went to a small campsite in summer and there was practically no one there because their main tourist season was spring and autumn when people went climbing. Catalans are big on climbing in general. I know the OPs are not looking in that area, but just to say that tourists seasons vary depending on climate and attractions.
Not unlike the mountains I have to drive through from my house to reach the Costa Blanca coast: castell-de-guadalest.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Ross_and_Fiona

In the area where I live a lot of the houses are second homes owned by Spanish people from the big cities like Madrid. However, a few years ago I spent a few nights at a four-star hotel at Biar, on the edge of the Mariola national park, and it was packed with British mountain walkers. Some Belgian friends who live near me offer mountain biker holidays, mainly to other Belgians, and I often see cars with Dutch and German number plates driving along the mountain roads in my area. As a matter of interest, "El Tel" (football legend Terry Venables) runs a boutique hotel in a mountain village not far from me and he attracts customers from far and wide.
Thats great, thanks for this. Good to know people are coming to Alicante from all over.
I had a look at Terry's hotel - very impressive!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,278 Posts
Not unlike the mountains I have to drive through from my house to reach the Costa Blanca coast: View attachment 91398
Been there!
Went with my Spanish in laws, they had a house in Calpe, and later went with my Mum and Dad. The castle itself is pretty touristy, but nothing else is as the coaches tend to go directly there. The countryside is beautiful I remember, and I was surprised how close it was to Benidorm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,278 Posts
Thanks for this. We loved Catalonia, in fact, we lived in Barcelona for a year. We wanted to settle there but found the winter quite tough, it rained a lot. We are looking for a dry climate with year round weather.
Uh Oh,
Nowhere in Spain has wall to wall sunshine. Even the Canaries has a rainy season (you can look up "floods Canaries"!) and the weather is becoming more and more unpredictable as the years go by. I think Almeria is tipped off as becoming a desert, so maybe there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Uh Oh,
Nowhere in Spain has wall to wall sunshine. Even the Canaries has a rainy season (you can look up "floods Canaries"!) and the weather is becoming more and more unpredictable as the years go by. I think Almeria is tipped off as becoming a desert, so maybe there.
haha, yeah dry climate was pushing it a little! I'm fine with some rain but there was just too much in Barcelona.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
558 Posts
Hi Fiona and Ross. Welcome to the forum, but if you think you'll get good advice here on a self-catering venture, it's like asking a fisherman where's a good spot to fish. The fisherman ain't going to give away his hard earned experience etc and inform (forgivee the term) a Johnny-com-lately the benefit of his knowledge.

But, it is good to see somebody coming to Spain and trying something rather than trying nothing. During the recession, I reckon every beauty therapist, hairdresser, mechanic, panel-beater, landscaper, electrician, plasterer, plumber, steel processer, etc etc thought there was an opening for their skills in the sun. The truth is that outside of the aforementioned many are currently trying to make an existence through self catering with cookery schools, Spanish classes, Cycling/Exploring/Walking Groups.

What you have got to do is come up with something different than anybody else that will attract attention from prospective customers. Unfortunately, I cannot see an opening where you can make an impression. If you can't keep ahead of the bills, you're dead-in-the-water. I kid you not.

Unless you have a load of monetary back-up which will keep you in clover for quite some time forget about your venture. OK! If everybody was to read this there would be no new start-ups in Spain; perhaps I'm talking rubbish? But, whatever you decide to do, leave room for a dignified retreat in case things go pear-shape.

I'm nearly sorry I posted. Rule of Thumb for Starting:- If you don't speak perfect Spanish don't bother trying any start-up.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top