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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
During an interview for a spouse visa, how would an applicant answer the following question:

What would you do if your visa is refused?

Please help....thank you in advance.
 

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It seems to me that that's something as to which only you know the actual answer: in other words, what WOULD you do? Have your spouse move to your country, choose a third country...? I don't think there's any "right" answer to the question - although perhaps one of the moderators has a different view on this?

It also strikes me that any genuine couple applying for a spouse visa would have discussed what to do if it's refused.

In this as in all things, you should be honest and open in your reply. Beyond that, I don't know that anyone can give you very useful advice.

Good luck to you in your interview.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you so much for your reply. No doubt- we have discussed this and i (sponsor) will move to applicant's country if he is refused a visa. However, the reason i asked is because if applicant says that I (sponsor) will move to live with him- won't the ECO feel like we do not really want this visa. Just thought there was a better way of saying it. Thanks for your help.
 

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I can't think that anyone who didn't truly want the visa would put in all the time and expense needed to file for it. It's a daunting effort!

Maybe someone else will have a better suggestion, but I think it would be reasonable (and honest!) to say something like, "We'll be devastated if the visa is refused, but we'll do whatever we legally can and must to be together. I only hope we will have the chance to do that in the UK, where we are sure we can be productive members of society." It's a little over the top, maybe, but I expect you both feel that way.

Do let us know whether the question comes up in the interview - it does seem almost a cruel question for them to ask, doesn't it?
 

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In my own honest opinion and answer to that question:

We will not stop applying for a visa till we get it approved! This is the only way we could be together to start building a family of our own.
 

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Oh dear, I didn't mean anything negative by saying that I thought most couples would have discussed it! I guess if you're confident that you meet the requirements, already know you won't give up no matter what, and/or have a more optimistic outlook than pessimists like me, you might well not have talked over what to do in the event of a refusal.

And of course, if the reason for the refusal was something either clerical (missing documents) or financial (not enough earnings/savings), then just addressing the deficiencies would be the logical thing to do.
 

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I have a child from a previous relationship so uprooting him from everything he knows is not an option for me. That's probably why we've never discussed it.
 

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Oh dear, I didn't mean anything negative by saying that I thought most couples would have discussed it! I guess if you're confident that you meet the requirements, already know you won't give up no matter what, and/or have a more optimistic outlook than pessimists like me, you might well not have talked over what to do in the event of a refusal.

And of course, if the reason for the refusal was something either clerical (missing documents) or financial (not enough earnings/savings), then just addressing the deficiencies would be the logical thing to do.
I am usually a realistic person but I'm just hoping the prep pays off. No other choice really.
 

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I agree this is rather a harsh question and obviously catches one of guard. My son will be sponsoring his wife in the new year and meets all the requirements so there is no reason she should be turned down other than missing documents or lack of evidence etc which I am making dam sure does not happen. Their child will also be a British citizen so the only answer is to reapply I would say....
 

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I have thought about this question. I would I keep the answer short. I would say we would look at the reasons for refusal and then either appeal or re-apply.
 
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