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I wrote a long response, regarding my experiences of having a child in Malaysia before marrying the Filipina mother.
Then I read the date of the original post as being in July 2014 and decided that most of what I had written was no longer helpful.
Ooops!
It is the thought that counts :)

Anyway, a few things I wanted to update.

My little one is now five and a half months old - and extremely 'pogi'. He has already started crawling around and even started making 'mamamama' sounds when he is trying to attract mum's attention - so I think I have a little half-Filipino Einstein on my hands (or maybe just proud-daddy goggles on my eyes).

We opted for an Irish passport first (I am dual nationality) which took about 4 months to sort out because I needed all sorts of documents demonstrating that both my parents (now deceased) were born there (as I was born in the UK).

The passport eventually came and then we started the process of getting his dependent visa in Malaysia - as he (which also meant we) could not leave the country without it.

Apparently some other expats who had their kids in Malaysia didn't know this requirement and then got stopped at the airport by Malaysian immigration demanding the baby's 'entry' visa - I guess no one could stamp it in the maternity ward :p Anyway, that bureaucratic obstacle was also overcome this week.

Now that we can actually leave Malaysia as a family we are planning to go to the Phils in the next few weeks for a Christening.

After doing some reading online it seems some parishes have various requirements that including pre-Christening seminars, baptism certificates and proof that you are actively practicing. Like my mahal I am Catholic - but pretty much lapsed and she is not very observant either. My Filipino family assure me that the requirements differ from parish to parish and that some are not so 'strict' on the requirements - but was wondering what your own experiences of Christening in the Phils are?

I have been informed that we need a lot of God Parents (I only had two) and get the impression that an entourage of God Parents is a common practice in the Phils? Is that correct?

Changing the subject completely I see some discussion on PhilHealth and wanted to share a little experience we had. My wife has been a Phil Health member for around a year. However, we had the baby in Malaysia in a private hospital. Despite my scepticism my wife (through her family back home) made an application for some repayment for our hospital expenses here - and PhilHealth have apparently approved at least some of it. They haven't told us what they will pay yet and we have had to jump through a number of hoops to get to this point in the first place but I was still pleasantly surprised that we would qualify for anything at all.
 

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Ninong/ninang

It is the thought that counts :)

Anyway, a few things I wanted to update.

My little one is now five and a half months old - and extremely 'pogi'. He has already started crawling around and even started making 'mamamama' sounds when he is trying to attract mum's attention - so I think I have a little half-Filipino Einstein on my hands (or maybe just proud-daddy goggles on my eyes).

We opted for an Irish passport first (I am dual nationality) which took about 4 months to sort out because I needed all sorts of documents demonstrating that both my parents (now deceased) were born there (as I was born in the UK).

The passport eventually came and then we started the process of getting his dependent visa in Malaysia - as he (which also meant we) could not leave the country without it.

Apparently some other expats who had their kids in Malaysia didn't know this requirement and then got stopped at the airport by Malaysian immigration demanding the baby's 'entry' visa - I guess no one could stamp it in the maternity ward :p Anyway, that bureaucratic obstacle was also overcome this week.

Now that we can actually leave Malaysia as a family we are planning to go to the Phils in the next few weeks for a Christening.

After doing some reading online it seems some parishes have various requirements that including pre-Christening seminars, baptism certificates and proof that you are actively practicing. Like my mahal I am Catholic - but pretty much lapsed and she is not very observant either. My Filipino family assure me that the requirements differ from parish to parish and that some are not so 'strict' on the requirements - but was wondering what your own experiences of Christening in the Phils are?

I have been informed that we need a lot of God Parents (I only had two) and get the impression that an entourage of God Parents is a common practice in the Phils? Is that correct?

Changing the subject completely I see some discussion on PhilHealth and wanted to share a little experience we had. My wife has been a Phil Health member for around a year. However, we had the baby in Malaysia in a private hospital. Despite my scepticism my wife (through her family back home) made an application for some repayment for our hospital expenses here - and PhilHealth have apparently approved at least some of it. They haven't told us what they will pay yet and we have had to jump through a number of hoops to get to this point in the first place but I was still pleasantly surprised that we would qualify for anything at all.
Having a Christening is a very joyful thing and I do believe the number of Ninongs and Ninangs can vary from parish to parish. It would be best to talk with the Priest at the church where you plan to have the event. The Christening ceremony should be relatively inexpensive, but the reception cost will depend on number of guests to attend, food costs, rental of videoke machine, etc., and how long the reception will last in time. In a lot of cases, the women usually prepare the food and your wife will know about that. It is Philippine tradition to have a lot of God Parents, same as in a Philippine church wedding, which can have up to 11 sets of them. By the way, congrats on your wedding and the birth of your son. We wish you much joy and blessings.
 
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Just to clarify a little, with regards to the 10 day waiting period, I believe people are referring to the minimum time required from when you apply for the marriage license and when you can actually have the ceremony performed.

I dont think anybody is going to look at stamps in your passport to make sure you've been in the country for 10 days before they perform the wedding.

I applied for my marriage license this past May, then immediately flew back to Bahrain, flew back a month later and got married 5-6 days after entering the country.
It is required that you be in the Philippines for 10 days before you marry.
I think you just slipped thru the system.
So, apparently they did not look at your passport stamps, as you said, but if they had, I think you would suffered a delay in your wedding plans.
 

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(side note)I presume that the baby's mother has already been through her CFO course, but if not, she needs to attend.

You have to have a civil wedding before you can have a church wedding.
I believe the civil wedding fee is around 250 pesos. It is less than 1000 pesos.

In regards to births in the Philippines, the child can have your last name, even if you are not married, as long as you sign forms to claim the child when registering the child's birth with the Philippine government.

In Malaysia, if you are not married, the child can also still receive your last name, but the birth certificate will indicate that the child is illegitimate.

The child will need a passport to travel.
So if the child is born in the Philippines, I suggest you begin as soon as possible after the birth to get the passport.

Does the order of which passport you get first matter to the UK?
Do you need to get the UK passport and then get the Philippine passport?
The order is not considered an issue when dealing with the U.S..

There is not a legal requirement for the child to be baptized before receiving documents which allow the child to travel.
But as a Catholic, I am sure you understand that love ones may have strong feelings on this matter.

If you are in Kuala Lumpur, all the ingredients can be found for making for Dinuguan.
The pork can found several places (grocery stores), but the blood needs to be obtained at a wet market, such as Pudu Market.
You should also know about the mall which is run by Filipinos.
The mall is located near Chinatown and is named "Kota Raya".
It has a Filipino dry goods grocery store.
The mall contains a shipping agency which can be of assistance when shipping items to the Philippines.
Haircuts there can be found for 10 RM.

Baby strollers and equipment is expensive in Malaysia, so check the prices and consider buying them in the Philippines.
 

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(side note)I presume that the baby's mother has already been through her CFO course, but if not, she needs to attend.

You have to have a civil wedding before you can have a church wedding.
I believe the civil wedding fee is around 250 pesos. It is less than 1000 pesos.

In regards to births in the Philippines, the child can have your last name, even if you are not married, as long as you sign forms to claim the child when registering the child's birth with the Philippine government.

In Malaysia, if you are not married, the child can also still receive your last name, but the birth certificate will indicate that the child is illegitimate.

The child will need a passport to travel.
So if the child is born in the Philippines, I suggest you begin as soon as possible after the birth to get the passport.

Does the order of which passport you get first matter to the UK?
Do you need to get the UK passport and then get the Philippine passport?
The order is not considered an issue when dealing with the U.S..

There is not a legal requirement for the child to be baptized before receiving documents which allow the child to travel.
But as a Catholic, I am sure you understand that love ones may have strong feelings on this matter.

If you are in Kuala Lumpur, all the ingredients can be found for making for Dinuguan.
The pork can found several places (grocery stores), but the blood needs to be obtained at a wet market, such as Pudu Market.
You should also know about the mall which is run by Filipinos.
The mall is located near Chinatown and is named "Kota Raya".
It has a Filipino dry goods grocery store.
The mall contains a shipping agency which can be of assistance when shipping items to the Philippines.
Haircuts there can be found for 10 RM.

Baby strollers and equipment is expensive in Malaysia, so check the prices and consider buying them in the Philippines.
DOHH!!!!
I should have read the end of the thread before I responded.
Oh well, I hope the information about Kuala Lumpur can be of some help.
 

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It is required that you be in the Philippines for 10 days before you marry.
I think you just slipped thru the system.
So, apparently they did not look at your passport stamps, as you said, but if they had, I think you would suffered a delay in your wedding plans.
I know most people will be staying in the Philippines during the 10 day waiting period but I dont think there is a specific requirement that the foreigner be there for those 10 days. Do you have a link showing that requirement?

The US Embassy website says: "Philippine law prescribes a ten-day waiting period from the filing of the application to the issuance of the marriage license." It doesnt say you have to actually be there for the 10 days.

I specifically asked both the pastor performing our ceremony and the Civil Registrar office at the Quezon City Hall before we got applied for our marriage license and they both said we only had to wait the 10 days for the marriage license. I explained to both that I would be going back to Bahrain and returning just before the ceremony and they said it would not be a problem.

Could it be a requirement? Sure, but I never found a link specifically saying the foreigner had to be in the Philippines for 10 days before getting married. If you have a link, Im sure it would help the other foreigners who are thinking of getting married in the Philippines.
 

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(side note)I presume that the baby's mother has already been through her CFO course, but if not, she needs to attend.

You have to have a civil wedding before you can have a church wedding.
I believe the civil wedding fee is around 250 pesos. It is less than 1000 pesos.

In regards to births in the Philippines, the child can have your last name, even if you are not married, as long as you sign forms to claim the child when registering the child's birth with the Philippine government.

In Malaysia, if you are not married, the child can also still receive your last name, but the birth certificate will indicate that the child is illegitimate.

The child will need a passport to travel.
So if the child is born in the Philippines, I suggest you begin as soon as possible after the birth to get the passport.

Does the order of which passport you get first matter to the UK?
Do you need to get the UK passport and then get the Philippine passport?
The order is not considered an issue when dealing with the U.S..

There is not a legal requirement for the child to be baptized before receiving documents which allow the child to travel.
But as a Catholic, I am sure you understand that love ones may have strong feelings on this matter.

If you are in Kuala Lumpur, all the ingredients can be found for making for Dinuguan.
The pork can found several places (grocery stores), but the blood needs to be obtained at a wet market, such as Pudu Market.
You should also know about the mall which is run by Filipinos.
The mall is located near Chinatown and is named "Kota Raya".
It has a Filipino dry goods grocery store.
The mall contains a shipping agency which can be of assistance when shipping items to the Philippines.
Haircuts there can be found for 10 RM.

Baby strollers and equipment is expensive in Malaysia, so check the prices and consider buying them in the Philippines.
"Need to have a civil wedding before yiu have a church wedding"

Where did that one come from. Is it a new requirement. Definitely wasn't a requirement when I had my church wedding, it was a while ago though.
 

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I know most people will be staying in the Philippines during the 10 day waiting period but I dont think there is a specific requirement that the foreigner be there for those 10 days. Do you have a link showing that requirement?

The US Embassy website says: "Philippine law prescribes a ten-day waiting period from the filing of the application to the issuance of the marriage license." It doesnt say you have to actually be there for the 10 days.

I specifically asked both the pastor performing our ceremony and the Civil Registrar office at the Quezon City Hall before we got applied for our marriage license and they both said we only had to wait the 10 days for the marriage license. I explained to both that I would be going back to Bahrain and returning just before the ceremony and they said it would not be a problem.

Could it be a requirement? Sure, but I never found a link specifically saying the foreigner had to be in the Philippines for 10 days before getting married. If you have a link, Im sure it would help the other foreigners who are thinking of getting married in the Philippines.
?? I do not have anything to cite.
You do have information from an authority.
I apparently just believed this without checking it out.
I concede the point.
My mistake.
 

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"Need to have a civil wedding before yiu have a church wedding"

Where did that one come from. Is it a new requirement. Definitely wasn't a requirement when I had my church wedding, it was a while ago though.
Grin- uhhhh --- my wife.....isn't that authority enough ?
;-) I will have to search to see if she is correct.
But, in support of this belief when my wife and I were registering to get married by the Catholic priest, the secretary did ask for our civil marriage certificate.

The following link supports your position, not mine.
http://purplelue.com/how-to-list/catholic-church-wedding-requirements/
 

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Grin- uhhhh --- my wife.....isn't that authority enough ?
;-) I will have to search to see if she is correct.
But, in support of this belief when my wife and I were registering to get married by the Catholic priest, the secretary did ask for our civil marriage certificate.

The following link supports your position, not mine.
Catholic Church Wedding Requirements | Purplelue Wedding Blog
Here is another good cite, but it also supports the point that one may have a License to Marry before having a church wedding or you can be married by civil authorities before being married by the church.
How to Get Married in the Philippines - An Ultimate Guide
 

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Here is another good cite, but it also supports the point that one may have a License to Marry before having a church wedding or you can be married by civil authorities before being married by the church.
How to Get Married in the Philippines - An Ultimate Guide
The licence to marry is what you get after the 10 waiting period. Once you have that you can then go and get married, after which you get the marriage license.
 

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Marriage ceremonies.

As much as Nila and I want a traditional church wedding we will have to be satisfied with our civil wedding ceremony. And as long s the Philippines and the USA accepts this we are OK. Looking at my condition, I would be looking like Jabba the Hutt or Buddha and Nila would be fantastic in her $1,500 gown.
 

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Eurobob, no problem! I wasnt trying to poke you in the eye; I thought maybe you had read something somewhere that addressed the topic and I didn't want to give out bad information.
 

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(side note)

You have to have a civil wedding before you can have a church wedding.
I believe the civil wedding fee is around 250 pesos. It is less than 1000 pesos.
Is this something new? Aren't the Catholic priests/pastors licensed to perform weddings? Now I am confused. :confused:
 

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You do not need a Civil Wedding first. You need to get your marriage license first then you can get a Civil Ceremony or Church Ceremony or both. After the wedding in our case about 2 weeks we received the Wedding Certificate from NSO.
 

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Eurobob, no problem! I wasnt trying to poke you in the eye; I thought maybe you had read something somewhere that addressed the topic and I didn't want to give out bad information.
No worries.
If anything, I "poked myself in the eye" by giving incorrect information.
(I am only annoyed with myself.)

I think it is good for this site that people/members asked me to clarify or cite a reference for my information because by doing so we were able to identify the mistaken information and make sure the site was providing better quality advice.
 
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