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Hello
I'm about to begin university here in the United States. I've always been interested in living in Germany. I was wondering if there were specific fields of study that would be more conductive for future immigration. I've been considering studying either journalism or some area of scientific research, as well as, of course, German. Would it be difficult to find work as either a journalist or chemist/geneticist abroad? Are there other majors which would be more helpful?
Thank you much.
Mary
 

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Go for scientific direction. I would say it is more difficult to work as a journalist than as a chemist. But in the end you better choose what you like to do not what brings you more money.
 

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Hello
I'm about to begin university here in the United States. I've always been interested in living in Germany. I was wondering if there were specific fields of study that would be more conductive for future immigration. I've been considering studying either journalism or some area of scientific research, as well as, of course, German. Would it be difficult to find work as either a journalist or chemist/geneticist abroad? Are there other majors which would be more helpful?
Thank you much.
Mary
Consider to study in Germany as you would be eligible for a post study work visa afterwards that can be converted into a residence permit later on.

Immigrating to Germany otherwise would entail studying, gaining relevant work experience (usually five years), finding an employer willing to sponsor you and getting approval from the authorities (depending on your field of work this might or might not entail a resident labour market test through which the employer has to prove that nobody in the EU - 500 million people - could do the job).

Degree equivalency might also be an issue.

As an American you do have it a bit easier than many other nationalities, though. You can come to Germany on a visa waiver, look for jobs and apply for a work permit in country rather than going back and applying at your nearest German Embassy.
 

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I would do something that you are passionate about. You will be working in these areas for many years. English is the language of science within Germany. I imagine that you would need to be completely fluent in German for other fields. This may be a factor to consider too during your training.
 

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There's is always a need for qualified translators and interpreters. You may think that there are enough Germans that speak English but generally employers prefer native speakers. I did this for a number of years without any formal qualifications but a university degree in German particularly with translation certification is really helpful.

On the other hand, I ended up studying physics although I don't wish to stay in Germany there are many opportunities to do doctoral studies here in the natural sciences as Germans are pretty keen on titles. Perhaps consider doing a postgrad masters here - they are even taught in English quite often.
 
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