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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Absolute Typhoon Security Housing is a reality and it's here. I'm certain that it would cost an arm and a leg +, but this looks to me to be the ultimate protection from typhoons or anything else. Perfect for the Philippines. This actually looks like something you would find on the island of Guam due to the high number of typhoons and earthquakes there.
Check this out...
 

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I live on Guam, I have not seen anything like your fortress picture, but it is pretty impressive. Some here is concrete post and beam with CMU filling, stucco overlay with a concrete roof, and typhoon shutters or poured in place solid concrete. Part of my roof is pitched with steel overlay that looks like clay tile and the rest is flat. You have to pressure wash and repaint your roof every 5 years or so with elastomeric paint. Guam has not had a typhoon in over 5 years since I have lived here but earthquakes are common. I do not know any builders, I bought this house ready made. Summary: most houses here are concrete in some form, entirely, with typhoon shutters, various architectural designs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I live on Guam, I have not seen anything like your fortress picture, but it is pretty impressive. Some here is concrete post and beam with CMU filling, stucco overlay with a concrete roof, and typhoon shutters or poured in place solid concrete. Part of my roof is pitched with steel overlay that looks like clay tile and the rest is flat. You have to pressure wash and repaint your roof every 5 years or so with elastomeric paint. Guam has not had a typhoon in over 5 years since I have lived here but earthquakes are common. I do not know any builders, I bought this house ready made. Summary: most houses here are concrete in some form, entirely, with typhoon shutters, various architectural designs.
That's good information and a less expensive route than in the original article. How do the houses and other buildings there hold up in the frequent earthquakes? Are there building codes that are enforced for earthquake safety?
 

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I'd go for plan "B". Live in a nipa hut right on the beach with a decent store of wine. With the money I'd save, every time PAGASA said a typhoon was on its way I'd invite the neighbours over, we'd finish the wine and then I'd hop on a plane for Cambodia for a week. After visiting temples and drinking beer on the Mekong I'd wander back, pay the neighbours to rebuild the nipa hut and buy a new stock of wine. Repeat as often as necessary.

Come to think of it, this approach would possibly entice you to find the most typhoon prone part of the country to set up shop. Any decent beaches in Aurora?
 

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Apparently GovGuam ratified a change from seismic code 3 to seismic code 4 and adopted Uniform Building Codes of 2009, a CONUS style consensus standard. Largely unenforced. Fortunately, the typhoon design largely contributes to whole building integrity. Results of web searching the topic.

This was concern for me when I built my home in Tarlac, I have extra large columns and beams with abundant rebar, said to be built to a code of 6, whatever that means. The pictures of the rebar and the columns look impressive to the uninitiated eye such as mine.
 
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