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Hello everyone!

After a 6 months wait we finally received the invitation to apply for the Skilled Worker visa (189). At this stage we have only 60 days to deliver the all the documents, criminal records and medical examinations, pay and submit before December 3rd 2017.
The doubts, uncertainties and fears returned. It's a big decision!
We have a 19 month old toddler and we are expecting the arrival of our second baby in April 2018.
So here's my question: is Australia still one of the best countries in the world to live? To those who are already there, how do you consider the state of the nation?
Please share your opinions on issues such as employment / unemployment, social inequalities, housing prices, services and essential goods, etc. Tell us what you see on television and in your daily life. Is it worth dropping everything we accomplished in Portugal (home, car, money in the bank) and going on an adventure with two children under two?
 

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I would say don't move. If you can afford to shell out the money needed to get PR in Australia, you can live a very comfortable life in your home country- Portugal.

As far as I know, Portugal does not have any major issues like high unemployment, terrorism, food crisis, etc. It's as good a place as any.

I think Australia is still a good place to live in but not as good as say 10 to 15 years ago.

The cost of living is very high. But the wages here hasn't been increased in like 20 years.

International work experience is not valued here. They need local experience. Your field is IT - so it may be different. Do your own research.

You have two toddlers. Why would you want to put more pressure on yourself by moving to another country?

You will actually lose money if both you and your wife go to work. One of you needs to stay home to take care of the kids as daycare costs more than what you make in a day.

Australia has more than 20,000 people migrating into the country on an annual basis on 189 and 190 visas alone. The number will increase when count 457 visas and spouse visas. No matter how good a country is, if it has that many people coming into it, the standards of living will eventually decline.
 

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I would say don't move. If you can afford to shell out the money needed to get PR in Australia, you can live a very comfortable life in your home country- Portugal.

As far as I know, Portugal does not have any major issues like high unemployment, terrorism, food crisis, etc. It's as good a place as any.

I think Australia is still a good place to live in but not as good as say 10 to 15 years ago.

The cost of living is very high. But the wages here hasn't been increased in like 20 years.

International work experience is not valued here. They need local experience. Your field is IT - so it may be different. Do your own research.

You have two toddlers. Why would you want to put more pressure on yourself by moving to another country?

You will actually lose money if both you and your wife go to work. One of you needs to stay home to take care of the kids as daycare costs more than what you make in a day.

Australia has more than 20,000 people migrating into the country on an annual basis on 189 and 190 visas alone. The number will increase when count 457 visas and spouse visas. No matter how good a country is, if it has that many people coming into it, the standards of living will eventually decline.
I wonder how much you know about Portugal. Although I really like it, I'd only consider living there as a retiree.

In my limited experience, the level of services, and standard of living, is a bit lower than most of Western Europe. The country itself and the people are terrific, consistently - but I suspect that depends a little on how you behave to them, as in most countries! :) I was last there about 18 months ago.

Unemployment is about 9% in Portugal, youth unemployment about 24%. In Australia that is 5.5% and about 13%.

Schooling is generally of a high standard in Australia. Day care costs are high, but they are subsidised. At present, Child Care Rebate covers 50% of costs up to $7500pa and Child Care Benefit is paid depending on income, number of kids, hours of care. If the kids are too young for school you get about $215pw each.

Daycare places cost between about $100 and $150 per day, per child. Daycare costs are indeed one of the biggest single problems for young families.

I'll leave you to crunch the numbers. :)

However, the system will change from July next year. There will be just one new payment.

Assuming both parents work or study at least 8 hours a week, if you earn less than $65,000 you'll get an 85% subsidy, up to $170,000 it tapers down gradually to 50%, tapering down more after that.

The economy is still pretty flat, but growing slightly - even with a very big Migration Program (which Australia has had for some time) it has not been in an economic recession since 1991, and that is only matched in the Western world by The Netherlands. The best guess seems to be that growth will continue but at very low levels - but who'd trust an economist! :)

If you are comparing prices, Sydney and Melbourne are very expensive, but the wages are higher too. Check Numbeo for comparisons, for example: https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-livi...untry2=Australia&city1=Lisbon&city2=Melbourne

The average wage in Portugal is about $23,000. In Australia it's about $80,000. This is why you'll see on Numbeo that although prices are much higher in Australia, the actual purchasing power in Australia is still higher, meaning the standard of living is higher.

In terms of quality of life, this may be of some interest (you can select "by rank" on the bottom right): OECD Better Life Index

Personally, I'd be more concerned about the differences in culture, possibly the different pace in a major Australian city, the separation from family and friends - the distance from "home" and all that is familiar, and the stress of starting a new life. It may be very hard at the start, especially for a young mother with very young kids, until the family finds their way.

Very few people think moving to Australia was a bad move, but that doesn't necessarily make it easy. :)
 
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