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Hi everyone, i am from Singapore. i got a rather complex issue so i will put them in points so as to make it easier to read. I do not mean to sound curt, just want it to be easy to digest.

1) i have 3 areas of experiences and certifications. -- Occupational Safety & Health Adviser for 3 years(Diploma and Specialist Diploma), Parachute packer for 6 years(military army certifications), Veterinary nurse for 6 months(Diploma in molecular science, not vet nursing per se).

2) i have a same gender de facto partner for 5 years. She is a laboratory research executive for 3 years (Bachelor's). She wants to relocate to NZ too.

3) Which option should I fill in for my EOI for better chances, so to speak? Can we fill in our EOI each, but reflect in the application that we have a de facto partner (which is each other)?

4) We are prepared to expect ourselves not end up doing what we are qualified for. She is 28, I am 33. But what are our chances to even get a visa to enter NZ to search for jobs?

5) In terms of real jobs and not just what gets us by, are our chances of getting those jobs listed above any good? We understand she may need extra registration to work in laboratories and medical facilities; is that hard to get also?

6) thanks for reading. NZ seems to be welcoming Singaporeans via attractive adverts from 2010. We are ready to move, if NZ will have us.

7) we do not have extremely much financially, and would like to find our footing with as little money as possible (minimum trial and error with consultant agencies, can't do this via study visa etc).

***Last question added by mod from duplicate post in the main forum***

8) What is the likelihood of us getting an ITA or job search visa etc, after submitting our EOI into the pool, even without job offers and with about 120 to 125 points?
 

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Hi everyone, i am from Singapore. i got a rather complex issue so i will put them in points so as to make it easier to read. I do not mean to sound curt, just want it to be easy to digest.

1) i have 3 areas of experiences and certifications. -- Occupational Safety & Health Adviser for 3 years(Diploma and Specialist Diploma), Parachute packer for 6 years(military army certifications), Veterinary nurse for 6 months(Diploma in molecular science, not vet nursing per se).

2) i have a same gender de facto partner for 5 years. She is a laboratory research executive for 3 years (Bachelor's). She wants to relocate to NZ too.

3) Which option should I fill in for my EOI for better chances, so to speak? Can we fill in our EOI each, but reflect in the application that we have a de facto partner (which is each other)?

4) We are prepared to expect ourselves not end up doing what we are qualified for. She is 28, I am 33. But what are our chances to even get a visa to enter NZ to search for jobs?

5) In terms of real jobs and not just what gets us by, are our chances of getting those jobs listed above any good? We understand she may need extra registration to work in laboratories and medical facilities; is that hard to get also?

6) thanks for reading. NZ seems to be welcoming Singaporeans via attractive adverts from 2010. We are ready to move, if NZ will have us.

7) we do not have extremely much financially, and would like to find our footing with as little money as possible (minimum trial and error with consultant agencies, can't do this via study visa etc).
1. As far as I know, your latest occupation would be considered, and due to that occupation, the points for qualifications will be given which are relevant to that occupation only. I guess, you may have multiple occupations but only consider last few years what you were doing.

2. Pl refer to the definition of Partner here, according to Immigration New Zealand (INZ). You don't need to worry if you have valid proofs for your genuine and stable relationship. This section also covers informatino about De facto relationship. Also consider reading Partnership Requirements here.

3. You don't have to submit EOI for each of you. You need to decide first that who should be the principal applicant. You or your partner. However, in any case you don't need to submit EOI for each separately. You both together, would be the best to decide who should be the principal applicant.

4. NZ doesn't recommend this. You should be supposed to do what you are qualified and experienced for. And that's what is the main idea of encouraging Skilled Migration Category (SMC) in the first place. In case you land up there with all success (I hope and wish so) and still you are not able to get the job in your occupation, then it is upto you to take up any jobs legally available for you. But that should be the worst case scenario and that's not in fact the point of concern at this moment. Since you want to achieve the visa under SMC, you must focus on the facts available with you in the form of documents and proofs, to validate your profile and successfully obtain the residency to NZ.

As you mentioned, she's 28. In this case, applying for her as principal applicant gives you 5 bonus points of age. This is because 20-29 years of age bracket gets 30 bonus points, while 30-39 gets 25 bonus points. You can validate this fact here.

5. You can look for your occupations and its scope for jobs in NZ on www.careers.govt.nz website. You can find your occupation and it will show most information about it. Be it salaries, opportunities, occupational registrations and much more. It also shows statistical information on each occupation regarding historical data, current market etc. Regarding extra registration, I believe that nothing is to get in NZ. Its all about how much you have compliance to their rules and regulations. There's no biasedness in their outcomes.

6. NZ welcomes you if you are really ready to move.

7. Going with a consultant is good to have, but not must have. NZ specifies each aspect well defined in their official websites. If you have enough time to go through (it's not that longer) you can easily achieve what are you upto. Study visa is a longer route to NZ residency. If you want to spend more but learn also, it's good, but again, not mandatory. Nobody would really want to spend a few years of life in studying just to achieve the visa.
 

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Being a same sex couple is not an issue, as long as you can prove you are in a long-term and steady relationship. Do you have joint bank accounts, shared rental receipts, lots of photos together? etc etc.
If so, as the poster above has said, decide which of you should be the principal applicant (ie whoever can can get above 140 points).
Otherwise, as you are both under 35, you could both come under a working holiday visa, which I think allows you to live and work in NZ for 1 year. From there you can get a feel for the job front, although I don't think you are supposed to look for full time employment under the conditions of that visa.
 

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Hi everyone, i am from Singapore. i got a rather complex issue so i will put them in points so as to make it easier to read. I do not mean to sound curt, just want it to be easy to digest.

1) i have 3 areas of experiences and certifications. -- Occupational Safety & Health Adviser for 3 years(Diploma and Specialist Diploma), Parachute packer for 6 years(military army certifications), Veterinary nurse for 6 months(Diploma in molecular science, not vet nursing per se).

2) i have a same gender de facto partner for 5 years. She is a laboratory research executive for 3 years (Bachelor's). She wants to relocate to NZ too.

3) Which option should I fill in for my EOI for better chances, so to speak? Can we fill in our EOI each, but reflect in the application that we have a de facto partner (which is each other)?

4) We are prepared to expect ourselves not end up doing what we are qualified for. She is 28, I am 33. But what are our chances to even get a visa to enter NZ to search for jobs?

5) In terms of real jobs and not just what gets us by, are our chances of getting those jobs listed above any good? We understand she may need extra registration to work in laboratories and medical facilities; is that hard to get also?

6) thanks for reading. NZ seems to be welcoming Singaporeans via attractive adverts from 2010. We are ready to move, if NZ will have us.

7) we do not have extremely much financially, and would like to find our footing with as little money as possible (minimum trial and error with consultant agencies, can't do this via study visa etc).

***Last question added by mod from duplicate post in the main forum***

8) What is the likelihood of us getting an ITA or job search visa etc, after submitting our EOI into the pool, even without job offers and with about 120 to 125 points?
Hi and welcome to the forum,

I'm going to start backwards....

(8) Without a job offer and only 120 / 125 points you have absolutely no chance of the EOI being selected from the pool. You will need at least 140 points or a job offer.

(7) Immigration consultants are expensive and I'd only recommend a person using one if their case is particularly difficult - i.e. you have a known medical issue, past criminal issue or problems with qualifications and experience etc. If you feel the process should be plain sailing then there is no need to have a consultant working for you. It is all very well explained on the INZ website.
The process of migration to NZ (or any other country for that matter) isn't that expensive. In my opinion it should be more costly but that's another debate for another day :cool:
Whichever way you choose to come to NZ you have to be mindful of the costs involved which will be in the range of NZ $10k - $20k for the Resident Visa via the Skilled Migrant Category - EOI fees, ITA fees, Migrant Levy fees, fees associated with any qualification assessment, police checks, medicals, then actual costs to move here - flights, insurance, shipping personal belongings etc etc.
If you choose a more temporary route - e.g. a study visa, the costs will appear in smaller quantities but the length of time taken to get a resident visa will take longer and cost more in the long run no doubt.

(6) It's not just your neck of the woods they are trying to attract. It's anyone, so long as the individual is an advantage to NZ and assists in it's future prosperity.

(5) In terms of a visa that will allow you to work in a permanent job, you will only be able to come if you can secure a skilled job. Immigration are not interested in people coming here to work in jobs that just allow you to get by and survive as you aren't adding to the country's future. Only in terms of a study visa or a working holiday visa etc are you allowed to work in a non-skilled job just as a means to assist in supporting yourself whilst in NZ.

(4) You are unlikely to secure a skilled job or be offered a skilled job in an area that you are not qualified for.
In terms of the Resident Visa process, getting a job search visa is one of three possible outcomes to your application and not your decision. The job search visa can be awarded in lieu of the Resident Visa and is usually offered to people where Immigration believe the individual may have issues getting a job and/or settling here so they offer the opportunity for you to prove yourself with this visa first by allowing you 9 months to get a skilled job. If you do land a job then they will re-assess your resident visa application and should award it. If you don't find a job and don't settle then their fears are realized and you leave NZ with the Resident visa being declined.
The are only two other job search visa's that I know of....
One can be obtained at the end of a period of study (post study job search visa) and the other is the Silver Fern Job Search Visa which is a specific visa available every year online. This should open in November. There's only 300 of them available each year and they go in a matter of minutes.

(3) If you are intending to come to NZ together you only need one application, so one EOI. One of you is the principal applicant and the other is the secondary applicant or partner applicant. Make sure you have evidence that you have been living together for at least 12 months as you will need this if you do get ITA.

(2) Cool. Since partner has a Bachelor's degree and assuming that degree is exempt from assessment or has been assessed so that either way it is recognized in NZ, you may find you get higher points if partner is the principal applicant ? You can check this out on the points indicator. https://www.immigration.govt.nz/pointsindicator/

(1) You'll need to decide who will be the principal applicant and then check whether or not the person will need to have professional registration in NZ. Immigration insist that if you do need it you must be in the process of applying for it before they will consider any application. It is easy to contact the professional registration bodies directly if you do need to start the registration process. Usually these bodies will need details of qualifications, skills and experience and IELTS to prove their English Language Requirement then they will assess and report what you will need to do in order to become registered in NZ and also the cost.
 

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Hello one and all,

Just wanna give a big thank you to all who replied, and your kind words. We have been trying to read up more about getting accepted in NZ, and of cos, sending resumes to whoever we think might have a look at us.

We have signed up for a free migration seminar, so we are looking forward to more first hand experience, and see what we can learn and take away.

We will try to come out with the best permutation for our chances, and you guys are right, my partner will likely be the principal applicant.

Will keep you guys posted if anything! THANK YOU ONCE AGAIN FOR READING MY THREAD. Every piece of advice warms our hearts, that there is real help out there.

Thank you, and God bless!
 
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