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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My wife (Canadian) and I (EU citizen) will head to the EU/Schengen tomorrow (and from there on to France in about 3 weeks). I need to decide what financial or other documents to take with me.

We'll definitely take:

-marriage and birth certificates
-my employment letter from Canada
-proof of health insurance

My question is: for the Carte de Sejour application, what financial documents should I bring? Last 3 bank statements? Roughly how much money will we need proof for, given that we'll stay for 10 months? Is it acceptable to print online bank statements once I am in France (and leave paper originals here)?

I do have a bank account in France, but not too much is in it.

Related to this, my current employment letter does not state my salary. Will I need one that includes it?

Finally, somewhere I saw something mentioned of proof that my wife and I are living together, like lease or proof of joint bank account. Is this necessary? This could be difficult, since only my name is on our lease and we only recently started having a joint account.

Any help would be appreciated! Especially within the next 12 hours...
 

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Since you're going to be going for a carte de séjour for the spouse of an EU national, it's not nearly as critical. Main things are identity papers (i.e. birth certificates and passports/national i.d. card), proof that you are married, proof that you have a place to live and proof that both of you have health cover. You'll also need proof of your "statut" (i.e. what you're doing in France), but your employment letter should be fine, even without your salary indicated, as long as it shows what you're doing in France. (I.e., aren't you on a sabbatical?) And it isn't necessary that your wife's name be on the lease. (She is coming to "join" you after all.)

https://www.service-public.fr/particuliers/vosdroits/F19315 is the page from Service Public. Click on the Démarches tab for a list of the documents you need for a "first" card for a family member of an EU national. You don't actually need a carte de séjour for yourself, especially if you have a national i.d. from Austria.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you very much, Bev! Also for the link. That's great you think I don't need to bring more.

Yes, I'll be on sabbatical. I have a letter from my university stating for how long I have been employed and saying that I will be on paid leave and will return to my position after the year. It does not mention France or salary. To be safe better have them add both? That way it also proves I have enough resources to support my wife?

I do have an invitation letter from the university I'll visit in France. It's written by my collaborator... would it be better to get a letter from the department chair?
 

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Seriously, don't worry about proving your net worth or salary level. The employment letter is only to prove your "status" - i.e. that you are in France on sabbatical and duly employed and being paid by by your US university while you're here. They normally don't ask for more than that for a spouse of an EU national. Remember - as an EU national you have the upper hand over those who need visas. (You use any and all advantages you have.)
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you very much. In the meantime we had a smooth travel to the EU, using the EU passport line at the airport on arrival and getting a stamp for my wife.

Just to double check: so you think it's enough the letter from my university says I'm on paid leave (and in particular doesn't say that I will work in France)?
 

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We've had a number of professors on sabbatical through here - non-EU nationals - and apparently the standard for them is to get a visitor visa (which technically does not allow them to work). The fact that they are still working for their university back in the States makes it OK if they function as a "visiting professor" in France. I think it's because there is an end date to their stay in France. The key thing is, I guess, that the letter state that you're on leave from the university and will be functioning in whatever capacity during your stay in France. But it wouldn't hurt to indicate that you are expected to return to your "day job" back in the States at the end of your sabbatical.
Cheers,
Bev
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you, Bev! The current letter does state I will return to my normal duties after the year. However, based on your comments, I think I'll have them make it clearer that I'll be doing my research in France.
 
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