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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It seems that cooking apples (e.g Granny Smith etc) are not readily available in out local shops.
What French variety is the recommended for making a traditional apple pie or apple sauce?

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It seems that cooking apples (e.g Granny Smith etc) are not readily available in out local shops.
What French variety is the recommended for making a traditional apple pie or apple sauce?

Cheers
Boscop, they are a Belgian variety and very good as cookers if you want the apple to fall. Not good for Tarte tatin when you want them to hold their shape.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm surprised that you can't find Granny Smith apples. Have you tried asking your local fruit and veg supplier if he can get them for you?
Yes, got something of a blank look 😉
 

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About a month ago one of our local farms had a Pick Your Own weekend.
Gala for eating, Canada Gris and Golden for cooking. Never tried Canada before but leave them in their skins and bake for apple sauce and they are good, peel them and they start turning brown before they've hit the lemon juiced water, but at €0.60 a kg they are definitely a bargain.
 

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Hm, we get lots of Granny Smiths around here. Even got a Granny Smith apple tree at the local nursery. But not sure I'd use Granny Smiths for an apple pie. Maybe something a bit sweeter. Golden Delicious are very popular here and I see those Pink Lady apples in all the stores - evidently known for their sweetness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hm, we get lots of Granny Smiths around here. Even got a Granny Smith apple tree at the local nursery. But not sure I'd use Granny Smiths for an apple pie. Maybe something a bit sweeter. Golden Delicious are very popular here and I see those Pink Lady apples in all the stores - evidently known for their sweetness.
Probably not for an American apple pie, but Granny Smith is the best for traditional English style. Golden Delicious should have been labelled as an invasive species 😉
 

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It seems that cooking apples (e.g Granny Smith etc) are not readily available in out local shops.
It's been a difficult year for orchards with early blossoming in February/March followed by harsh frosts killing the flowers.
My neighbour has 4 hectares with 20 varieties of apples.
Grannies and Fuji were hard hit which may explain the shortage
but Golden, Canada grise/blanche, Jubilee, Pink Gold among others pulled through better.
 

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Probably not for an American apple pie, but Granny Smith is the best for traditional English style. Golden Delicious should have been labelled as an invasive species 😉
Surely the Bramlyapple is the quintessential apple for an English style apple pie, difficult to find now, so, in this house the Boscop makes do. I, personally, don’t rate the Granny Smith apple, I would use a reinette if I could not find boscop,not tried Canada grisl for cooking but will keep it in mind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Surely the Bramlyapple is the quintessential apple for an English style apple pie, difficult to find now, so, in this house the Boscop makes do. I, personally, don’t rate the Granny Smith apple, I would use a reinette if I could not find boscop,not tried Canada grisl for cooking but will keep it in mind.
I couldn't get Bramleys even when I lived in the UK but you are right, they are the best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Another culinary question.
We do not seem to be able find any corn on the cob in France, strange as the fields are full of it - or were earlier on. Do the French not eat it?
 

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Having grown apples commercially, here are a few suggestions. If a cullinary type is required for apple pies, these are English varieties that are excellent. Bramley Seedling ( the most excellent variety for pies, is very acid and does need some sweetening) Sweet Coppin ( another slightly acid variety, not as the name suggests and holds firm when cooked) Brown's Apple ( a slightly acid variety which has red skin but white flesh and cooks well in tarts)
Grannie Smith has become outclassed as it was used as a Dessert/Cullinary variety, not quite so acid as the varieties stated.
Cider varieties do make good pies and tarts, just need to find the right ones. In France there are oodles of varieites especially in the Normandy area.
Dessert varieties are not ideal for pie making.

I will investigate my exstensive records which include many French varieties and try to post more later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Having grown apples commercially, here are a few suggestions. If a cullinary type is required for apple pies, these are English varieties that are excellent. Bramley Seedling ( the most excellent variety for pies, is very acid and does need some sweetening) Sweet Coppin ( another slightly acid variety, not as the name suggests and holds firm when cooked) Brown's Apple ( a slightly acid variety which has red skin but white flesh and cooks well in tarts)
Grannie Smith has become outclassed as it was used as a Dessert/Cullinary variety, not quite so acid as the varieties stated.
Cider varieties do make good pies and tarts, just need to find the right ones. In France there are oodles of varieites especially in the Normandy area.
Dessert varieties are not ideal for pie making.

I will investigate my exstensive records which include many French varieties and try to post more later.
Thank you, that's very interesting. Look forward to hearing some more from you
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
David a lot are grown in Kent under contract to the major Pie/tart manufacturers. It is the only variety most multiples will use
I lived in the frozen wastes of Norfolk ;)
 

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It might be over but it doesn't seem to make it as far as the shops
No fresh corn on the cob in the stores here either. This area produces a huge amount of corn, but by now what did not sell quickly would have gone to the frozen food industry, which generally waits until the price of fresh corn begins to drop a little because it is no longer really fresh and producers and wholesalers cannot afford to store a product whose value is falling. I wouldn't buy 'fresh' now, simply because it isn't fresh.

The French do eat corn on the cob, but it is certainly not a big thing here.
 
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